26

So I have a plist structured string, that get dynamically (not from the file system). How would I convert this string to a NSDictionary.

I've tried converting it NSData and then to a NSDictionary with NSPropertyListSerialization, but it returns "[NSCFString objectAtIndex:]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x100539f40" when I attempt to access the NSDictionary, showing that my Dictionary was not successfully created.

Example of the NSString (that is the plist data):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> 
<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" "http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd"> 
<plist version="1.0"> 
<dict> 
 <key>Key1</key> 
 <dict> 
  <key>Test1</key> 
  <false/> 
  <key>Key2</key> 
  <string>Value2</string> 
  <key>Key3</key> 
  <string>value3</string> 
 </dict> 
</dict> 
</plist> 

Thanks!

72

See Serializing a Property List

NSData* plistData = [source dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
NSString *error;
NSPropertyListFormat format;
NSDictionary* plist = [NSPropertyListSerialization propertyListWithData:plistData mutabilityOption:NSPropertyListImmutable format:&format errorDescription:&error];
NSLog( @"plist is %@", plist );
if(!plist){
    NSLog(@"Error: %@",error);
    [error release];
}
  • 4
    +1 Your solution seems nicely polished — using immutable for creating an NSDictionary and remembering to release the error if there is one are worth bonus points. :-) – Quinn Taylor Jul 2 '09 at 4:45
  • I almost called that an over-release. Um, wow. That API totally violates the memory management rules by requiring the caller to release that error string. – Peter Hosey Jul 2 '09 at 5:17
  • According to the Release Notes, it changed to not have that violation in Leopard. Worth looking out for. There's a bug report about it: openradar.appspot.com/5563963 – Peter Hosey Jul 2 '09 at 7:20
  • My understanding is that the documentation is correct and the release notes are (now) wrong, as Apple decided to leave the leak in for compatibility reasons. – Michael Tsai Jul 2 '09 at 14:34
  • 18
    This method is now deprecated and you should use propertyListWithData:options:format:error: instead. – Rafael Bugajewski Apr 5 '11 at 18:29
12

Try this:

NSData * data = [yourString dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];

NSString *errorDesc = nil;
NSPropertyListFormat format;
NSDictionary * dict = (NSDictionary*)[NSPropertyListSerialization
                                      propertyListFromData:data
                                      mutabilityOption:NSPropertyListMutableContainersAndLeaves
                                      format:&format
                                      errorDescription:&errorDesc];
  • Except for the memory leak, but heck it happens (: – Jacob Sep 24 '09 at 9:45
  • NSDictionary * dict = (NSDictionary*)[NSPropertyListSerialization ...... You need to check the file you are trying to read as you may be returning an NSArray instead of NSDictionary. – Komposr Sep 26 '13 at 2:05
1

I've tried converting it NSData and then to a NSDictionary with NSPropertyListSerialization, but it returns "[NSCFString objectAtIndex:]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x100539f40" when I attempt to access the NSDictionary, showing that my Dictionary was not successfully created.

No, it shows no such thing. What it shows is that you tried to treat a string as an array. You'd need to determine where in the plist you were trying to get an array and why there was a string where you expected an array—i.e., whether you created the plist incorrectly (putting a string into it where you meant to put an array) or are examining it incorrectly (the presence of a string is correct; your subsequent expectation of an array is wrong).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.