585

How do I convert int[] into List<Integer> in Java?

Of course, I'm interested in any other answer than doing it in a loop, item by item. But if there's no other answer, I'll pick that one as the best to show the fact that this functionality is not part of Java.

3
  • We can make use of IntStream.Of(array).collect(Collectors.toList) Commented May 15, 2020 at 11:01
  • 1
    @SarojKumarSahoo There is no one-argument collect in IntStream. Commented Oct 12, 2020 at 0:25
  • 1
    There is no build-in way to do it. You must do it manually, declare an ArrayList and add each value in the int Array to ArrayList. What a miss!
    – Zhou Haibo
    Commented Mar 24, 2021 at 8:37

21 Answers 21

578

Streams

  1. In Java 8+ you can make a stream of your int array. Call either Arrays.stream or IntStream.of.
  2. Call IntStream#boxed to use boxing conversion from int primitive to Integer objects.
  3. Collect into a list using Stream.collect( Collectors.toList() ). Or more simply in Java 16+, call Stream#toList().

Example:

int[] ints = {1,2,3};
List<Integer> list = Arrays.stream(ints).boxed().collect(Collectors.toList());

In Java 16 and later:

List<Integer> list = Arrays.stream(ints).boxed().toList();
10
  • 28
    Equivalent to: Arrays.stream(ints).boxed().collect(Collectors.toList());
    – njfrost
    Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 17:12
  • 4
    @njfrost You're right and IntStream.of just calls Arrays.stream so I've improved the answer following your suggestion Commented Oct 4, 2017 at 8:00
  • 2
    For some reason this doesn't seem to be returning the expected result type on Android Studio(works on eclipse) It says, expected List<Integer> found List<Object>. Commented Aug 7, 2018 at 19:13
  • 2
    It looks clean and concise but when I used this as opposed to the basic solution provided by @willcodejavaforfood on leetcode the program performance degraded in terms of memory as well as runtime Commented Mar 31, 2020 at 3:31
  • 1
    @chitreshsirohi that is because lambda functions used inside streams result in Java to make some anonymous classes. Commented Jun 2, 2020 at 3:44
351

There is no shortcut for converting from int[] to List<Integer> as Arrays.asList does not deal with boxing and will just create a List<int[]> which is not what you want. You have to make a utility method.

int[] ints = {1, 2, 3};
List<Integer> intList = new ArrayList<Integer>(ints.length);
for (int i : ints)
{
    intList.add(i);
}
14
  • 34
    It is best to initialise the list with the size of the array Commented Jul 2, 2009 at 11:54
  • 114
    for (int i : ints) intList.add(i); Commented Jul 2, 2009 at 12:19
  • 18
    @willcodejavaforfood - David means that this is better: new ArrayList<Integer>(ints.length); Commented Jul 2, 2009 at 12:25
  • 12
    @willcodejavaforfood: declaring the size of the ArrayList when it is being constructed will prevent it having to internally resize after a certain amount is added. Not sure if the benefit is small, but there's definitely a benefit. Commented Jan 24, 2010 at 20:22
  • 13
    new ArrayList<Integer>() {{ for (int i : ints) add(i); }}
    – user4910279
    Commented Jul 2, 2015 at 1:55
194

Also from guava libraries... com.google.common.primitives.Ints:

List<Integer> Ints.asList(int...)
4
  • 13
    This one should be the right answer. See the second sentence of the question: "Of course, I'm interested in any other answer than doing it in a loop, item by item."
    – josketres
    Commented Apr 22, 2014 at 12:22
  • 3
    There are a few subtleties here. The returned list uses the provided array as backing store, so you should not mutate the array. The list also doesn't guarantee identity of the contained Integer objects. That is, the result of list.get(0) == list.get(0) is not specified.
    – pburka
    Commented Apr 22, 2015 at 15:45
  • 1
    Beware of the method reference count on Android when adding libraries. Good find though.
    – milosmns
    Commented Oct 3, 2016 at 13:39
  • In Android I had to add implementation 'com.google.firebase:firebase-crashlytics-buildtools:2.9.0' to build.gradle for this to work. Commented Jun 5, 2022 at 10:02
117

Arrays.asList will not work as some of the other answers expect.

This code will not create a list of 10 integers. It will print 1, not 10:

int arr[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 };
List lst = Arrays.asList(arr);
System.out.println(lst.size());

This will create a list of integers:

List<Integer> lst = Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10);

If you already have the array of ints, there is not quick way to convert, you're better off with the loop.

On the other hand, if your array has Objects, not primitives in it, Arrays.asList will work:

String str[] = { "Homer", "Marge", "Bart", "Lisa", "Maggie" };
List<String> lst = Arrays.asList(str);
3
  • 10
    Do note, that that list is immutable
    – Danielson
    Commented Sep 21, 2018 at 16:22
  • 5
    Arrays.asList(arr) in the above comment will generate a list of type List<int[]> which is incompatible with List<Integer>. If one were to try to assign the output to a variable like so ``` List<Integer> l = Arrays.asList(arr); ``` you'd get the following error | Error: | incompatible types: inference variable T has incompatible bounds | equality constraints: java.lang.Integer | lower bounds: int[] | List<Integer> l = Arrays.asList(a); | ^--------------^ Commented Jan 9, 2021 at 15:46
  • 1
    this is wrong! it generates List<int[]>
    – d2k2
    Commented Jan 12, 2023 at 12:02
56

I'll add another answer with a different method; no loop but an anonymous class that will utilize the autoboxing features:

public List<Integer> asList(final int[] is)
{
    return new AbstractList<Integer>() {
            public Integer get(int i) { return is[i]; }
            public int size() { return is.length; }
    };
}
4
  • 1
    +1 this is shorter than mine but mine works for all primitives types
    – dfa
    Commented Jul 2, 2009 at 12:31
  • 7
    While quicker and using less memory than creating an ArrayList, the trade off is List.add() and List.remove() don't work. Commented Jul 2, 2009 at 13:03
  • 3
    I quite like this solution for large arrays with sparse access patterns but for frequently accessed elements it would result in many unnecessary instantiations of Integer (e.g. if you accessed the same element 100 times). Also you would need to define Iterator and wrap the return value in Collections.unmodifiableList.
    – Adamski
    Commented Jul 2, 2009 at 13:44
  • @Christoffer thanks. I have added the set method and now I can even sort the array...
    – freedev
    Commented Jul 28, 2014 at 12:17
47

The smallest piece of code would be:

public List<Integer> myWork(int[] array) {
    return Arrays.asList(ArrayUtils.toObject(array));
}

where ArrayUtils comes from commons-lang :)

2
  • 12
    Just note ArrayUtils it's a relative big library for an Android app
    – msysmilu
    Commented Nov 24, 2015 at 13:30
  • 1
    The opposite operation is described here: stackoverflow.com/a/960507/1333157 ArrayUtils.toPrimitive(...) is the key.
    – ZeroOne
    Commented May 29, 2019 at 10:25
37

In Java 8 with stream:

int[] ints = {1, 2, 3};
List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
Collections.addAll(list, Arrays.stream(ints).boxed().toArray(Integer[]::new));

or with Collectors

List<Integer> list =  Arrays.stream(ints).boxed().collect(Collectors.toList());
1
  • 4
    Why not simply use a collector?
    – assylias
    Commented May 18, 2014 at 12:23
24

In Java 8 :

int[] arr = {1,2,3};
IntStream.of(arr).boxed().collect(Collectors.toList());
23

If you are using java 8, we can use the stream API to convert it into a list.

List<Integer> list = Arrays.stream(arr)     // IntStream 
                                .boxed()        // Stream<Integer>
                                .collect(Collectors.toList());

You can also use the IntStream to convert as well.

List<Integer> list = IntStream.of(arr) // return Intstream
                                    .boxed()        // Stream<Integer>
                                    .collect(Collectors.toList());

There are other external library like guava and apache commons also available convert it.

cheers.

13

It's also worth checking out this bug report, which was closed with reason "Not a defect" and the following text:

"Autoboxing of entire arrays is not specified behavior, for good reason. It can be prohibitively expensive for large arrays."

10
int[] arr = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };

List<Integer> list = Arrays.stream(arr)     // IntStream
                            .boxed()        // Stream<Integer>
                            .collect(Collectors.toList());

see this

8

give a try to this class:

class PrimitiveWrapper<T> extends AbstractList<T> {

    private final T[] data;

    private PrimitiveWrapper(T[] data) {
        this.data = data; // you can clone this array for preventing aliasing
    }

    public static <T> List<T> ofIntegers(int... data) {
        return new PrimitiveWrapper(toBoxedArray(Integer.class, data));
    }

    public static <T> List<T> ofCharacters(char... data) {
        return new PrimitiveWrapper(toBoxedArray(Character.class, data));
    }

    public static <T> List<T> ofDoubles(double... data) {
        return new PrimitiveWrapper(toBoxedArray(Double.class, data));
    }  

    // ditto for byte, float, boolean, long

    private static <T> T[] toBoxedArray(Class<T> boxClass, Object components) {
        final int length = Array.getLength(components);
        Object res = Array.newInstance(boxClass, length);

        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
            Array.set(res, i, Array.get(components, i));
        }

        return (T[]) res;
    }

    @Override
    public T get(int index) {
        return data[index];
    }

    @Override
    public int size() {
        return data.length;
    }
}

testcase:

List<Integer> ints = PrimitiveWrapper.ofIntegers(10, 20);
List<Double> doubles = PrimitiveWrapper.ofDoubles(10, 20);
// etc
6

The best shot:

    /**
     * Integer modifiable fixed length list of an int array or many int's.
     *
     * @author Daniel De Leon.
     */
    public class IntegerListWrap extends AbstractList<Integer> {
    
        int[] data;
    
        public IntegerListWrap(int... data) {
            this.data = data;
        }
    
        @Override
        public Integer get(int index) {
            return data[index];
        }
    
        @Override
        public Integer set(int index, Integer element) {
            int r = data[index];
            data[index] = element;
            return r;
        }
    
        @Override
        public int size() {
            return data.length;
        }
    }
  • Support get and set.
  • No memory data duplication.
  • No wasting time in loops.

Examples:

int[] intArray = new int[]{1, 2, 3};
List<Integer> integerListWrap = new IntegerListWrap(intArray);
List<Integer> integerListWrap1 = new IntegerListWrap(1, 2, 3);
1
  • I like it the most. But I'd still use guava to have straight-forward solution :)
    – dantuch
    Commented Aug 19, 2012 at 23:27
4

Here is another possibility, again with Java 8 Streams:

void intArrayToListOfIntegers(int[] arr, List<Integer> list) {
    IntStream.range(0, arr.length).forEach(i -> list.add(arr[i]));
}
4

What about this:

int[] a = {1,2,3};
Integer[] b = ArrayUtils.toObject(a);
List<Integer> c = Arrays.asList(b);
2

If you're open to using a third party library, this will work in Eclipse Collections:

int[] a = {1, 2, 3};
List<Integer> integers = IntLists.mutable.with(a).collect(i -> i);
Assert.assertEquals(Lists.mutable.with(1, 2, 3), integers);

Note: I am a committer for Eclipse Collections.

2
   /* Integer[] to List<Integer> */



        Integer[] intArr = { 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100 };
        List<Integer> arrList = new ArrayList<>();
        arrList.addAll(Arrays.asList(intArr));
        System.out.println(arrList);


/* Integer[] to Collection<Integer> */


    Integer[] intArr = { 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100 };
    Collection<Integer> c = Arrays.asList(intArr);
2

Here is a solution:

int[] array = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 };

Integer[] iArray = Arrays.stream(array).boxed().toArray(Integer[]::new);
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(iArray));

List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<>();
Collections.addAll(list, iArray);
System.out.println(list);

Output:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
2

You could use IntStream of and boxed it to Integer after that sorted using reverseOrder comparator.

List<Integer> listItems = IntStream.of(arrayItems)
                .boxed()
                .sorted(Collections.reverseOrder())
                .collect(Collectors.toList());

This approach has the advantage of being more flexible, as you can use different collectors to create different types of lists (e.g., an ArrayList, a LinkedList, etc.).

1

Here is a generic way to convert array to ArrayList

<T> ArrayList<T> toArrayList(Object o, Class<T> type){
    ArrayList<T> objects = new ArrayList<>();
    for (int i = 0; i < Array.getLength(o); i++) {
        //noinspection unchecked
        objects.add((T) Array.get(o, i));
    }
    return objects;
}

Usage

ArrayList<Integer> list = toArrayList(new int[]{1,2,3}, Integer.class);
0
Arrays.stream(ints).forEach(list::add);
1
  • @TomerShetah the statement is self explanatory. I expect reader to have a minimal understanding of Java Stream API. Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 23:34

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