174

In numpy / scipy, is there an efficient way to get frequency counts for unique values in an array?

Something along these lines:

x = array( [1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1] )
y = freq_count( x )
print y

>> [[1, 5], [2,3], [5,1], [25,1]]

( For you, R users out there, I'm basically looking for the table() function )

14 Answers 14

124

Take a look at np.bincount:

http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.bincount.html

import numpy as np
x = np.array([1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1])
y = np.bincount(x)
ii = np.nonzero(y)[0]

And then:

zip(ii,y[ii]) 
# [(1, 5), (2, 3), (5, 1), (25, 1)]

or:

np.vstack((ii,y[ii])).T
# array([[ 1,  5],
         [ 2,  3],
         [ 5,  1],
         [25,  1]])

or however you want to combine the counts and the unique values.

  • 30
    Hi, This wouldn't work if elements of x have a dtype other than int. – Manoj Feb 24 '14 at 8:20
  • 5
    It won't work if they're anything other than non negative ints, and it will be very space inefficient if the ints are spaced out. – Erik Jun 9 '14 at 6:46
  • With numpy version 1.10 I found that, for counting integer, it is about 6 times faster than np.unique. Also, note that it does count negative ints too, if right parameters are given. – Jihun Jan 6 '16 at 15:43
379

As of Numpy 1.9, the easiest and fastest method is to simply use numpy.unique, which now has a return_counts keyword argument:

import numpy as np

x = np.array([1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1])
unique, counts = np.unique(x, return_counts=True)

print np.asarray((unique, counts)).T

Which gives:

 [[ 1  5]
  [ 2  3]
  [ 5  1]
  [25  1]]

A quick comparison with scipy.stats.itemfreq:

In [4]: x = np.random.random_integers(0,100,1e6)

In [5]: %timeit unique, counts = np.unique(x, return_counts=True)
10 loops, best of 3: 31.5 ms per loop

In [6]: %timeit scipy.stats.itemfreq(x)
10 loops, best of 3: 170 ms per loop
  • 15
    Thanks for updating! This is now, IMO, the correct answer. – Erve1879 Sep 25 '14 at 12:43
  • Double +1 -- this is the problem I'm trying to solve too. – Jason S Sep 25 '14 at 20:48
  • 1
    BAM! this is why we update...when we find answers like these. So long numpy 1.8. How can we get this to the top of the list? – user1269942 Oct 29 '14 at 21:08
  • 3
    @NumesSanguis What version of numpy are you using? Prior to v1.9, the return_counts keyword argument didn't exist, which might explain the exception. In that case, the docs suggest that np.unique(x, True) is equivalent to np.unique(x, return_index=True), which doesn't return counts. – jme Dec 2 '14 at 15:05
  • 1
    In older numpy versions the typical idiom to get the same thing was unique, idx = np.unique(x, return_inverse=True); counts = np.bincount(idx). When this feature was added (see here) some informal testing had the use of return_counts clocking over 5x faster. – Jaime Jan 28 '15 at 1:56
109

Update: The method mentioned in the original answer is deprecated, we should use the new way instead:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = [1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1]
>>> np.array(np.unique(x, return_counts=True)).T
    array([[ 1,  5],
           [ 2,  3],
           [ 5,  1],
           [25,  1]])

Original answer:

you can use scipy.stats.itemfreq

>>> from scipy.stats import itemfreq
>>> x = [1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1]
>>> itemfreq(x)
/usr/local/bin/python:1: DeprecationWarning: `itemfreq` is deprecated! `itemfreq` is deprecated and will be removed in a future version. Use instead `np.unique(..., return_counts=True)`
array([[  1.,   5.],
       [  2.,   3.],
       [  5.,   1.],
       [ 25.,   1.]])
  • 1
    Seems like the most pythonic approach by far. Also, I encountered issues with "object too deep for desired array" issues with np.bincount on 100k x 100k matrices. – metasequoia Mar 12 '14 at 21:02
  • 1
    I rather suggest the original question poser to change the accpted answer from the first one to this one, to increase its visiblity – wiswit Jul 8 '14 at 15:37
  • It's slow for versions before 0.14, though. – Jason S Sep 25 '14 at 20:47
  • take note that if the array is full of strings, both elements in each of the items returned are strings too. – user1269942 Jun 23 '15 at 4:48
  • Short and Sweet. – stochastic_zeitgeist Dec 15 '16 at 16:10
29

I was also interested in this, so I did a little performance comparison (using perfplot, a pet project of mine). Result:

 y = np.bincount(a)
 ii = np.nonzero(y)[0]
 out = np.vstack((ii, y[ii])).T

is by far the fastest. (Note the log-scaling.)

enter image description here


Code to generate the plot:

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import perfplot
from scipy.stats import itemfreq


def bincount(a):
    y = np.bincount(a)
    ii = np.nonzero(y)[0]
    return np.vstack((ii, y[ii])).T


def unique(a):
    unique, counts = np.unique(a, return_counts=True)
    return np.asarray((unique, counts)).T


def unique_count(a):
    unique, inverse = np.unique(a, return_inverse=True)
    count = np.zeros(len(unique), np.int)
    np.add.at(count, inverse, 1)
    return np.vstack((unique, count)).T


def pandas_value_counts(a):
    out = pd.value_counts(pd.Series(a))
    out.sort_index(inplace=True)
    out = np.stack([out.keys().values, out.values]).T
    return out


perfplot.show(
    setup=lambda n: np.random.randint(0, 1000, n),
    kernels=[bincount, unique, itemfreq, unique_count, pandas_value_counts],
    n_range=[2**k for k in range(26)],
    logx=True,
    logy=True,
    xlabel='len(a)'
    )
  • Thanks for posting the code to generate the plot. Didn't know about perfplot before now. Looks handy. – ruffsl Mar 7 '18 at 22:57
  • I was able to run your code by adding the option equality_check=array_sorteq in perfplot.show(). What was causing an error ( in Python 2) was pd.value_counts (even with sort=False). – user2314737 Jun 17 '18 at 17:38
21

Using pandas module:

>>> import pandas as pd
>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.array([1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1])
>>> pd.value_counts(pd.Series(x))
1     5
2     3
25    1
5     1

dtype: int64

  • 3
    pd.Series() is not necessary. Otherwise, good example. Numpy as well. Pandas can take a simple list as input. – Yohan Obadia Apr 23 '17 at 8:06
  • @YohanObadia - depending on the size f the array, first converting it to a series has made the final operation faster for me. I would guess at the mark of around 50,000 values. – n1k31t4 Oct 30 '18 at 11:50
17

This is by far the most general and performant solution; surprised it hasn't been posted yet.

import numpy as np

def unique_count(a):
    unique, inverse = np.unique(a, return_inverse=True)
    count = np.zeros(len(unique), np.int)
    np.add.at(count, inverse, 1)
    return np.vstack(( unique, count)).T

print unique_count(np.random.randint(-10,10,100))

Unlike the currently accepted answer, it works on any datatype that is sortable (not just positive ints), and it has optimal performance; the only significant expense is in the sorting done by np.unique.

  • does not work: AttributeError: 'numpy.ufunc' object has no attribute 'at' – P.R. Feb 27 '14 at 16:29
  • You need numpy 1.8 – Eelco Hoogendoorn Feb 28 '14 at 10:12
  • alright then I am outdated, sorry – P.R. Feb 28 '14 at 15:42
  • A simpler method would be to call np.bincount(inverse) – ali_m Oct 26 '15 at 13:55
14

numpy.bincount is the probably the best choice. If your array contains anything besides small dense integers it might be useful to wrap it something like this:

def count_unique(keys):
    uniq_keys = np.unique(keys)
    bins = uniq_keys.searchsorted(keys)
    return uniq_keys, np.bincount(bins)

For example:

>>> x = array([1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1])
>>> count_unique(x)
(array([ 1,  2,  5, 25]), array([5, 3, 1, 1]))
7

Even though it has already been answered, I suggest a different approach that makes use of numpy.histogram. Such function given a sequence it returns the frequency of its elements grouped in bins.

Beware though: it works in this example because numbers are integers. If they where real numbers, then this solution would not apply as nicely.

>>> from numpy import histogram
>>> y = histogram (x, bins=x.max()-1)
>>> y
(array([5, 3, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
       1]),
 array([  1.,   2.,   3.,   4.,   5.,   6.,   7.,   8.,   9.,  10.,  11.,
        12.,  13.,  14.,  15.,  16.,  17.,  18.,  19.,  20.,  21.,  22.,
        23.,  24.,  25.]))
4

Old question, but I'd like to provide my own solution which turn out to be the fastest, use normal list instead of np.array as input (or transfer to list firstly), based on my bench test.

Check it out if you encounter it as well.

def count(a):
    results = {}
    for x in a:
        if x not in results:
            results[x] = 1
        else:
            results[x] += 1
    return results

For example,

>>>timeit count([1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1]) would return:

100000 loops, best of 3: 2.26 µs per loop

>>>timeit count(np.array([1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1]))

100000 loops, best of 3: 8.8 µs per loop

>>>timeit count(np.array([1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1]).tolist())

100000 loops, best of 3: 5.85 µs per loop

While the accepted answer would be slower, and the scipy.stats.itemfreq solution is even worse.


A more indepth testing did not confirm the formulated expectation.

from zmq import Stopwatch
aZmqSTOPWATCH = Stopwatch()

aDataSETasARRAY = ( 100 * abs( np.random.randn( 150000 ) ) ).astype( np.int )
aDataSETasLIST  = aDataSETasARRAY.tolist()

import numba
@numba.jit
def numba_bincount( anObject ):
    np.bincount(    anObject )
    return

aZmqSTOPWATCH.start();np.bincount(    aDataSETasARRAY );aZmqSTOPWATCH.stop()
14328L

aZmqSTOPWATCH.start();numba_bincount( aDataSETasARRAY );aZmqSTOPWATCH.stop()
592L

aZmqSTOPWATCH.start();count(          aDataSETasLIST  );aZmqSTOPWATCH.stop()
148609L

Ref. comments below on cache and other in-RAM side-effects that influence a small dataset massively repetitive testing results.

  • This answer is really good, as it shows numpy is not necessarily the way to go. – Mahdi Apr 21 '15 at 8:21
  • @Rain Lee interesting. Have you cross-validated the list-hypothesis also on some non-cache-able dataset size? Lets assume a 150.000 random items in either representation and measured a bit more accurate on a single run as by an example of aZmqStopwatch.start();count(aRepresentation);aZmqStopwatch.stop() ? – user3666197 Aug 4 '15 at 19:17
  • Did some testing and yes, there are huge differences in real dataset performance. Testing requires a bit more insight into python internal mechanics than running just a brute-force scaled loops and quote non realistic in-vitro nanoseconds. As tested - a np.bincount() can be made to handle 150.000 array within less than 600 [us] while the above def-ed count() on a pre-converted list representation thereof took more than 122.000 [us] – user3666197 Aug 4 '15 at 19:40
  • Yeah, my rule-of-thumb is numpy for anything that can handle small amounts of latency but has the potential to be very large, lists for smaller data sets where latency critical, and of course real benchmarking FTW :) – David Sep 8 '15 at 19:28
4
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
x = np.array( [1,1,1,2,2,2,5,25,1,1] )
print(dict(pd.Series(x).value_counts()))

This gives you: {1: 5, 2: 3, 5: 1, 25: 1}

  • 1
    collections.Counter(x) also give the same result. I believe the OP wants a output that resembles R table function. Keeping the Series may be more useful. – pylang May 18 '17 at 8:12
2

To count unique non-integers - similar to Eelco Hoogendoorn's answer but considerably faster (factor of 5 on my machine), I used weave.inline to combine numpy.unique with a bit of c-code;

import numpy as np
from scipy import weave

def count_unique(datain):
  """
  Similar to numpy.unique function for returning unique members of
  data, but also returns their counts
  """
  data = np.sort(datain)
  uniq = np.unique(data)
  nums = np.zeros(uniq.shape, dtype='int')

  code="""
  int i,count,j;
  j=0;
  count=0;
  for(i=1; i<Ndata[0]; i++){
      count++;
      if(data(i) > data(i-1)){
          nums(j) = count;
          count = 0;
          j++;
      }
  }
  // Handle last value
  nums(j) = count+1;
  """
  weave.inline(code,
      ['data', 'nums'],
      extra_compile_args=['-O2'],
      type_converters=weave.converters.blitz)
  return uniq, nums

Profile info

> %timeit count_unique(data)
> 10000 loops, best of 3: 55.1 µs per loop

Eelco's pure numpy version:

> %timeit unique_count(data)
> 1000 loops, best of 3: 284 µs per loop

Note

There's redundancy here (unique performs a sort also), meaning that the code could probably be further optimized by putting the unique functionality inside the c-code loop.

1

some thing like this should do it:

#create 100 random numbers
arr = numpy.random.random_integers(0,50,100)

#create a dictionary of the unique values
d = dict([(i,0) for i in numpy.unique(arr)])
for number in arr:
    d[j]+=1   #increment when that value is found

Also, this previous post on Efficiently counting unique elements seems pretty similar to your question, unless I'm missing something.

  • The linked question is kinda similar, but it looks like he's working with more complicated data types. – Abe May 24 '12 at 16:44
0

import pandas as pd

import numpy as np

pd.Series(name_of_array).value_counts()

-2

from collections import Counter Counter(x)

  • 1
    please edit it to be shown as code and also give some explanation. – InAFlash Jul 17 '18 at 17:45

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