6

As I understand, backlog determines the size of the connection queue. Any extra requests greater this size at that time will be dropped off(is this statment right??).

Now I have very simple program server.c

socket()
bind()
listen(..., 5)
while(1)
{
  accept()
  read()
  write()
  sleep(3)
  close()
}

Now, I start 8 clients at a time to connect to this server. Surprisingly, the server serves all the 8 clients but instead it should queue only 5 clients & remaining 3 clients requests should be refused. Another interesting point is even if I put this backlog value as 0, the result is still same. Then I tried commenting listen() call, with this all 8 clients connections get refused.

Can somebody provide any inputs on this.

  • You should put read, write and close in a concurrent environment. In your code, when the next connection is accepted it seems the previous one has already been closed. Put the code in a thread and make sure each connection last sufficient long ensuring the situation 8 clients requesting your server simultaneously really occur. – Summer_More_More_Tea May 25 '12 at 6:47
  • i was testing backlog sometime back and didn't get anywhere. hope to see answers now. – tuxuday May 25 '12 at 6:48
  • OP, can you post your sample code. so that people can copy/paste and test it. – tuxuday May 25 '12 at 6:49
  • @ Summer_More_More_Tea The previous connection couldn't be closed immediately as a sleep of 3 seconds is present. Here all the 8 requests comes before 3 secs, so requests are already exceeding pending queue(5). – user1409528 May 25 '12 at 7:23
  • Possible duplicate of listen() ignores the backlog argument? – ks1322 Oct 10 '16 at 10:41
3

The backlog argument is a hint about the size of the queue. So you can't count on it to do what you are asking.

listen()

This answer seems to cover it.

And more information, a quote from the listen(2) man page on my Ubuntu system:

The backlog argument defines the maximum length to which the queue of pending connections for sockfd may grow. If a connection request arrives when the queue is full, the client may receive an error with an indication of ECONNREFUSED or, if the underlying protocol supports retransmission, the request may be ignored so that a later reattempt at connection succeeds.

Note that it says "may" everywhere.

  • In my system SOMAXCONN is set to 128. So what would be the behaviour if I start more than 128 clients at a time. – user1409528 May 25 '12 at 6:46
  • Yes, the specification says that values up to 128 shall be supported, but there is no obligation to actually limit the outstanding connections. And I'm assuming this specification is similar to what you are using. – Francis Upton IV May 25 '12 at 6:48
  • See the revision of my answer. – Francis Upton IV May 25 '12 at 6:50
0

I have done man listen on my system & get the following description:

DESCRIPTION

listen() marks the socket referred to by sockfd as a passive socket, that is, as a socket that will be used to accept incoming connection requests using accept(2). The sockfd argument is a file descriptor that refers to a socket of type SOCK_STREAM or SOCK_SEQPACKET. The backlog argument defines the maximum length to which the queue of pending connections for sockfd may grow. If a connection request arrives when the queue is full, the client may receive an error with an indication of ECONNREFUSED or, if the underlying protocol supports retransmission, the request may be ignored so that a later reattempt at connection succeeds.

  • Again, note the use of the word "may". There is no requirement to respect the backlog. – Francis Upton IV May 25 '12 at 7:03
  • If a connection request arrives when the queue is full, the client may receive an error with an indication of ECONNREFUSED or, if the underlying protocol supports retransmission, the request may be ignored so that a later reattempt at connection succeeds. Ok, you mean it can refuse the connections but in my case, it's just reattempting the connections later. right?? – user1409528 May 25 '12 at 7:08
  • Well what's probably happening in your case is that it's queuing the connection. The point is, you can't depend on it to refuse nor queue the connection, because that's not what the specification of listen() requires. And even if it works a certain way in some implementation, it's subject to change in any future update, so you should not depend on it. – Francis Upton IV May 25 '12 at 7:11
  • Thanks Francis for prompt reply – user1409528 May 25 '12 at 7:24
0

Server.c

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/un.h>
#include <unistd.h>
int main()
{
    int server_sockfd, client_sockfd;
    int server_len, client_len;
    struct sockaddr_un server_address;
    struct sockaddr_un client_address;

    unlink(“server_socket”);
    server_sockfd = socket(AF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

    server_address.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
    strcpy(server_address.sun_path, “server_socket”);
    server_len = sizeof(server_address);
    bind(server_sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&server_address, server_len);

    listen(server_sockfd, 5);
    while(1) 
    {
        char ch;
        printf(“server waiting\n”);

        client_len = sizeof(client_address);
        client_sockfd = accept(server_sockfd,(struct sockaddr *)&client_address, &client_len);

        read(client_sockfd, &ch, 1);
        ch++;
        write(client_sockfd, &ch, 1);
sleep(3);
        close(client_sockfd);
    }
}

Client.c

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/un.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
    int sockfd;
    int len;
    struct sockaddr_un address;
    int result;
    char ch = ‘A’;

    sockfd = socket(AF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, 0);

    address.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
    strcpy(address.sun_path, “server_socket”);
    len = sizeof(address);

    result = connect(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&address, len);
    if(result == -1) 
    {
        perror(“oops: client1”);
        exit(1);
    }

    write(sockfd, &ch, 1);
    read(sockfd, &ch, 1);
    printf(“char from server = %c\n”, ch);
    close(sockfd);
    exit(0);
}

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