242

I want to print out the contents of a vector in C++, here is what I have:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <cmath>
#include <vector>
#include <sstream>
#include <cstdio>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    ifstream file("maze.txt");
    if (file) {
        vector<char> vec(istreambuf_iterator<char>(file), (istreambuf_iterator<char>()));
        vector<char> path;
        int x = 17;
        char entrance = vec.at(16);
        char firstsquare = vec.at(x);
        if (entrance == 'S') { 
            path.push_back(entrance); 
        }
        for (x = 17; isalpha(firstsquare); x++) {
            path.push_back(firstsquare);
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < path.size(); i++) {
            cout << path[i] << " ";
        }
        cout << endl;
        return 0;
    }
}

How do I print the contents of the vector to the screen?

  • 1
    why is it "not working"? – Default May 25 '12 at 7:16

17 Answers 17

336

Purely to answer your question, you can use an iterator:

std::vector<char> path;
// ...
for (std::vector<char>::const_iterator i = path.begin(); i != path.end(); ++i)
    std::cout << *i << ' ';

If you want to modify the vector's contents in the for loop, then use iterator rather than const_iterator.

But there's lots more that can be said about this. If you just want an answer you can use, then you can stop here; otherwise, read on.

auto (C++11)/typedef

This is not another solution, but a supplement to the above iterator solution. If you are using the C++11 standard (or later), then you can use the auto keyword to help the readability:

for (auto i = path.begin(); i != path.end(); ++i)
    std::cout << *i << ' ';

But the type of i will be non-const (i.e., the compiler will use std::vector<char>::iterator as the type of i).

In this case, you might as well just use a typedef (not restricted to C++11, and very useful to use anyway):

typedef std::vector<char> Path;
Path path;
// ...
for (Path::const_iterator i = path.begin(); i != path.end(); ++i)
    std::cout << *i << ' ';

counter

You can, of course, use a integer type to record your position in the for loop:

for(int i=0; i<path.size(); ++i)
  std::cout << path[i] << ' ';

If you are going to do this, it's better to use the container's member types, if they are available and appropriate. std::vector has a member type called size_type for this job: it is the type returned by the size method.

// Path typedef'd to std::vector<char>
for( Path::size_type i=0; i<path.size(); ++i)
  std::cout << path[i] << ' ';

Why not just use this over the iterator solution? For simple cases you might as well, but the point is that the iterator class is an object designed to do this job for more complicated objects where this solution is not going to be ideal.

range-based for loop (C++11)

See Jefffrey's solution. In C++11 (and later) you can use the new range-based for loop, which looks like this:

for (auto i: path)
  std::cout << i << ' ';

Since path is a vector of items (explicitly std::vector<char>), the object i is of type of the item of the vector (i.e., explicitly, it is of type char). The object i has a value that is a copy of the actual item in the path object. Thus, all changes to i in the loop are not preserved in path itself. Additionally, if you would like to enforce the fact that you don't want to be able to change the copied value of i in the loop, you can force the type of i to be const char like this:

for (const auto i: path)
  std::cout << i << ' ';

If you would like to modify the items in path, you can use a reference:

for (auto& i: path)
  std::cout << i << ' ';

and even if you don't want to modify path, if the copying of objects is expensive you should use a const reference instead of copying by value:

for (const auto& i: path)
  std::cout << i << ' ';

std::copy

See Joshua's answer. You can use the STL algorithm std::copy to copy the vector contents onto the output stream. This is an elegant solution if you are comfortable with it (and besides, it is very useful, not just in this case of printing the contents of a vector).

std::for_each

See Max's solution. Using std::for_each is overkill for this simple scenario, but it is a very useful solution if you wanted to do more than just printing to screen: using std::for_each allows you to do any (sensible) operation on the vector contents.

overload ostream::operator<<

See Chris's answer, this is more a complement to the other answers since you will still need to implement one of the solutions above in the overloading. In his example he used a counter in a for loop. For example, this is how you could quickly use Joshua's solution:

template <typename T>
std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& out, const std::vector<T>& v) {
  if ( !v.empty() ) {
    out << '[';
    std::copy (v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<T>(out, ", "));
    out << "\b\b]";
  }
  return out;
}

Usage of any of the other solutions should be straightforward.

conclusion

Any of the solutions presented here will work. It's up to you and the code on which one is the "best". Anything more detailed than this is probably best left for another question where the pros/cons can be properly evaluated; but as always user preference will always play a part: none of the solutions presented are wrong, but some will look nicer to each individual coder.

addendum

This is an expanded solution of an earlier one I posted. Since that post kept getting attention, I decided to expand on it and refer to the other excellent solutions that were posted here. My original post had a remark that mentioned that if you were intending on modifying your vector inside a for loop then there are two methods provided by std::vector to access elements: std::vector::operator[] which does not do bounds checking, and std::vector::at which does perform bounds checking. In other words, at will throw if you try to access an element outside the vector and operator[] wouldn't. I only added this comment, originally, for the sake of mentioning something that it might be useful to know of if anyone already didn't. And I see no difference now. Hence this addendum.

  • If you're looping from 0 through vector::size() and the vector is not modified within the loop there is no need to use at() and incur the extra bounds checking overhead. That said, I would go with an iterator as you suggest. – Ed S. Jul 4 '12 at 21:39
  • 1
    @Ed: yeah, there's no point in using at if nothing in the loop modifies the vector, but I thought I'd mention it just in case the vector is modified in the loop (unrecommended as that might be) and because it never gets a mention and it might be useful to, at least, know of it. – Zorawar Jul 24 '12 at 20:53
  • The range-based for loop could be rewritten to use references, which may be important in case of large sub-objects, as follows: for (auto const &i: path) std::cout << i << ' '; – underscore_d Jul 15 '15 at 12:02
  • @underscore_d: thanks. I've cleaned up that section and I hope it's both more complete and a little clearer now. – Zorawar Jul 18 '15 at 16:29
  • "overload operator<<" is not a good solution; at least one operand of overloaded operator should be a class defined by your program, because of argument-dependent lookup – M.M Feb 1 '17 at 22:07
202

A much easier way to do this is with the standard copy algorithm:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm> // for copy
#include <iterator> // for ostream_iterator
#include <vector>

int main() {
    /* Set up vector to hold chars a-z */
    std::vector<char> path;
    for (int ch = 'a'; ch <= 'z'; ++ch)
        path.push_back(ch);

    /* Print path vector to console */
    std::copy(path.begin(), path.end(), std::ostream_iterator<char>(std::cout, " "));

    return 0;
}

The ostream_iterator is what's called an iterator adaptor. It is templatized over the type to print out to the stream (in this case, char). cout (aka console output) is the stream we want to write to, and the space character (" ") is what we want printed between each element stored in the vector.

This standard algorithm is powerful and so are many others. The power and flexibility the standard library gives you are what make it so great. Just imagine: you can print a vector to the console with just one line of code. You don't have to deal with special cases with the separator character. You don't need to worry about for-loops. The standard library does it all for you.

  • 3
    what if my vector was of type vector<pair<int, struct node>>. How do i use the above method to print this vector? – mtk Oct 23 '15 at 16:18
  • 6
    The delimiter string is written after every element, not between, i.e., also after the last. That may require dealing with special cases if you only want it between, i.e., as a separator. – Quigi Dec 28 '15 at 14:58
  • 2
    @mtk you can declare an operator<< function for your specific pair<>. – ShoeLace Jun 30 '17 at 3:38
  • Added an answer showing a similar approach but taking into accout @Quigi:s comment above, regarding the extra trailing separator. – dfri Jul 30 '17 at 13:37
  • @ShoeLace Is there no other way? – thegreatcoder Feb 24 at 6:46
64

In C++11 you can now use a range-based for loop:

for (auto const& c : path)
    std::cout << c << ' ';
  • This works great only if the size of the vector is not changed in the body of the range for loop. – Brian Dec 22 '14 at 6:59
  • 6
    @BrianP. Yup. Printing the elements of a container does not modify the range of the container. – Shoe Dec 22 '14 at 7:30
  • What's preferable here – c as a value copy or as a const reference to avoid the copying the element? – kleinfreund May 17 '15 at 11:01
  • @kleinfreund It depends on the content of the vector. For example for a vector of chars, chances are that passing by constant reference is actually more costly than by value. But here we are talking of super micro optimizations. – Shoe May 17 '15 at 11:05
37

I think the best way to do this is to just overload operator<< by adding this function to your program:

#include <vector>
using std::vector;
#include <iostream>
using std::ostream;

template<typename T>
ostream& operator<< (ostream& out, const vector<T>& v) {
    out << "{";
    size_t last = v.size() - 1;
    for(size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i) {
        out << v[i];
        if (i != last) 
            out << ", ";
    }
    out << "}";
    return out;
}

Then you can use the << operator on any possible vector, assuming its elements also have ostream& operator<< defined:

vector<string>  s = {"first", "second", "third"};
vector<bool>    b = {true, false, true, false, false};
vector<int>     i = {1, 2, 3, 4};
cout << s << endl;
cout << b << endl;
cout << i << endl;

Outputs:

{first, second, third}
{1, 0, 1, 0, 0}
{1, 2, 3, 4}
  • 2
    Storing v.size() - 1 as an int is a possible loss of precision. I fixed this in an accepted peer reviewed edit (stackoverflow.com/revisions/23397700/5), but it was thereafter edited again restoring the possible loss of precision. I guess it doesn't matter too much in practice since vectors aren't usually that big. – JDiMatteo Oct 9 '14 at 15:39
  • Not storing it as a variable decreases the readability of the code, which is a part of your edit I disagreed with. I've changed the type of last to size_t. – Chris Redford Oct 9 '14 at 17:27
  • size_t last = v.size() - 1; looks redundant, you can use if (i) out << ", "; condition before out << v[i]; link – Vladimir Gamalyan Jul 30 '16 at 8:16
  • 2
    This operator is not found by ADL, since it is not in the namespace of any of its arguments. So it will be hidden by any other namespace's operator<<. Example – M.M Feb 1 '17 at 22:19
20

How about for_each + lambda expression:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
...
std::vector<char> vec;
...
std::for_each(
              vec.cbegin(),
              vec.cend(),
              [] (const char c) {std::cout << c << " ";} 
              );
...

Of course, a range-based for is the most elegant solution for this concrete task, but this one gives many other possibilities as well.

Explanation

The for_each algorithm takes an input range and a callable object, calling this object on every element of the range. An input range is defined by two iterators. A callable object can be a function, a pointer to function, an object of a class which overloads () operator or as in this case, a lambda expression. The parameter for this expression matches the type of the elements from vector.

The beauty of this implementation is the power you get from lambda expressions - you can use this approach for a lot more things than just printing the vector.

10

Just copy the container to the console.

std::vector<int> v{1,2,3,4};
std::copy(v.begin(),v.end(),std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " " ));

Should output :

1 2 3 4
8

The problem is probably in the previous loop: (x = 17; isalpha(firstsquare); x++). This loop will run not at all (if firstsquare is non-alpha) or will run forever (if it is alpha). The reason is that firstsquare doesn't change as x is incremented.

6

Using std::copy but without extra trailing separator

An alternative/modified approach using std::copy (as originally used in @JoshuaKravtiz answer) but without including an additional trailing separator after the last element:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>

template <typename T>
void print_contents(const std::vector<T>& v, const char * const separator = " ")
{
    if(!v.empty())
    {
        std::copy(v.begin(),
                  --v.end(),
                  std::ostream_iterator<T>(std::cout, separator));
        std::cout << v.back() << "\n";
    }
}

// example usage
int main() {
    std::vector<int> v{1, 2, 3, 4};
    print_contents(v);      // '1 2 3 4'
    print_contents(v, ":"); // '1:2:3:4'
    v = {};
    print_contents(v);      // ... no std::cout
    v = {1};
    print_contents(v);      // '1'
    return 0;
}

Example usage applied to container of a custom POD type:

// includes and 'print_contents(...)' as above ...

class Foo
{
    int i;
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Foo& obj);
public:
    Foo(const int i) : i(i) {}
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const Foo& obj)
{
    return out << "foo_" << obj.i; 
}

int main() {
    std::vector<Foo> v{1, 2, 3, 4};
    print_contents(v);      // 'foo_1 foo_2 foo_3 foo_4'
    print_contents(v, ":"); // 'foo_1:foo_2:foo_3:foo_4'
    v = {};
    print_contents(v);      // ... no std::cout
    v = {1};
    print_contents(v);      // 'foo_1'
    return 0;
}
6

In C++11, a range-based for loop might be a good solution:

vector<char> items = {'a','b','c'};
for (char n : items)
    cout << n << ' ';

Output:

a b c 
3

I see two problems. As pointed out in for (x = 17; isalpha(firstsquare); x++) there's either an infinite loop or never executed at all, and also in if (entrance == 'S') if the entrance character is different than 'S' then nothing in pushed to the path vector, making it empty and thus printing nothing on screen. You can test the latter checking for path.empty() or printing path.size().

Either way, wouldn't it be better to use a string instead of a vector? You can access the string contents like an array as well, seek characters, extract substrings and print the string easily (without a loop).

Doing it all with strings might be the way to have it written in a less convoluted way and easier to spot the problem.

3

overload operator<<:

template<typename OutStream, typename T>
OutStream& operator<< (OutStream& out, const vector<T>& v)
{
    for (auto const& tmp : v)
        out << tmp << " ";
    out << endl;
    return out;
}

Usage:

vector <int> test {1,2,3};
wcout << test; // or any output stream
3

This answer is based on the answer from Zorawar, but i couldn't leave a comment there.

You can make the auto (C++11)/typedef version const by using cbegin and cend instead

for (auto i = path.cbegin(); i != path.cend(); ++i)
    std::cout << *i << ' ';
1

In C++11``

for (auto i = path.begin(); i != path.end(); ++i)
std::cout << *i << ' ';

for(int i=0; i<path.size(); ++i)
std::cout << path[i] << ' ';
  • This answer does not give any additional information compared to the already existing answers. – Yashas Nov 24 '17 at 15:13
  • Didn't saw the above answers :p .......should I remove the answer ? – Akash Kandpal Nov 24 '17 at 15:54
0
#include<bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector <pair<string,int> > v;
    int n;
    cin>>n;
int i;
    for( i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        int  end;
        string str;
        cin>>str;
        cin>>end;
        v.push_back(make_pair(str,end));
    }



for (int j=0;j<n;j++)
{
    cout<<v[j].first<< " "<<v[j].second<<endl;
}``
}
0

This worked for me:

    for (auto& i : name)
    {
    int r = 0;
    for (int j = 0; j < name[r].size();j++) 
    {
    std::cout << i[j];
    }
    r++;
    std::cout << std::endl;
    }
0

For those that are interested: I wrote a generalized solution that takes the best of both worlds, is more generalized to any type of range and puts quotes around non-arithmetic types (desired for string-like types). Additionally, this approach should not have any ADL issues and also avoid 'surprises' (since it's added explicitly on a case-by-case basis):

template <typename T>
inline constexpr bool is_string_type_v = std::is_convertible_v<const T&, std::string_view>;

template<class T>
struct range_out {
  range_out(T& range) : r_(range) {
  }
  T& r_;
  static_assert(!::is_string_type_v<T>, "strings and string-like types should use operator << directly");
};

template <typename T>
std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& out, range_out<T>& range) {
  constexpr bool is_string_like = is_string_type_v<T::value_type>;
  constexpr std::string_view sep{ is_string_like ? "', '" : ", " };

  if (!range.r_.empty()) {
    out << (is_string_like ? "['" : "[");
    out << *range.r_.begin();
    for (auto it = range.r_.begin() + 1; it != range.r_.end(); ++it) {
      out << sep << *it;
    }
    out << (is_string_like ? "']" : "]");
  }
  else {
    out << "[]";
  }

  return out;
}

Now it's fairly easy to use on any range:

std::cout << range_out{ my_vector };

The string-like check leaves room for improvement. I do also have static_assert check in my solution to avoid std::basic_string<>, but I left it out here for simplicity.

-1

You can write your own function:

void printVec(vector<char> vec){
    for(int i = 0; i < vec.size(); i++){
        cout << vec[i] << " ";
    }
    cout << endl;
}

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