93

I want to make sure I'm not inserting a duplicate row into my table (e.g. only primary key different). All my fields allow NULLS as I've decided null to mean "all values". Because of nulls, the following statement in my stored procedure can't work:

IF EXISTS(SELECT * FROM MY_TABLE WHERE 
    MY_FIELD1 = @IN_MY_FIELD1  AND
    MY_FIELD2 = @IN_MY_FIELD2  AND
    MY_FIELD3 = @IN_MY_FIELD3  AND 
    MY_FIELD4 = @IN_MY_FIELD4  AND
    MY_FIELD5 = @IN_MY_FIELD5  AND
    MY_FIELD6 = @IN_MY_FIELD6)
    BEGIN
        goto on_duplicate
    END

since NULL = NULL is not true.

How can I check for the duplicates without having an IF IS NULL statement for every column?

2

15 Answers 15

105

Along the same lines as @Eric's answer, but without using a 'NULL' symbol.

(Field1 = Field2) OR (ISNULL(Field1, Field2) IS NULL)

This will be true only if both values are non-NULL, and equal each other, or both values are NULL

3
  • 11
    This is definitely the tightest for Equality testing (A = B OR ISNULL(A, B) IS NULL without the unnecessary parens), but it's not safe to invert due to the way UNKNOWN fails to invert. The shortest Inequality test I've seen is @WileCau's. Commented May 15, 2014 at 5:01
  • This will have problem with indexes
    – Royi Namir
    Commented Oct 3, 2017 at 10:31
  • Yes, but this will return NULL if one or both values are NULL. We want something that returns false if one or both values are null.
    – Pxtl
    Commented Sep 26, 2019 at 19:17
59

Use INTERSECT operator.

It's NULL-sensitive and efficient if you have a composite index on all your fields:

IF      EXISTS
        (
        SELECT  MY_FIELD1, MY_FIELD2, MY_FIELD3, MY_FIELD4, MY_FIELD5, MY_FIELD6
        FROM    MY_TABLE
        INTERSECT
        SELECT  @IN_MY_FIELD1, @IN_MY_FIELD2, @IN_MY_FIELD3, @IN_MY_FIELD4, @IN_MY_FIELD5, @IN_MY_FIELD6
        )
BEGIN
        goto on_duplicate
END

Note that if you create a UNIQUE index on your fields, your life will be much simpler.

2
  • 1
    Note INTERSECT is only available from SQLServer 2005 onwards. Some of us are few years behind :) Commented Jul 2, 2009 at 16:43
  • 2
    When this approach was used as a partial join predicate for a single field it performed much slower than the equivalent "(a=b or (a is null and b is null))". Fields a and b happened to be sql_variants, perhaps that was why.
    – crokusek
    Commented Jan 1, 2015 at 1:58
49

I needed a similar comparison when doing a MERGE:

WHEN MATCHED AND (Target.Field1 <> Source.Field1 OR ...)

The additional checks are to avoid updating rows where all the columns are already the same. For my purposes I wanted NULL <> anyValue to be True, and NULL <> NULL to be False.

The solution evolved as follows:

First attempt:

WHEN MATCHED AND
(
    (
        -- Neither is null, values are not equal
        Target.Field1 IS NOT NULL
            AND Source.Field1 IS NOT NULL
            AND Target.Field1 <> Source.Field1
    )
    OR
    (
        -- Target is null but source is not
        Target.Field1 IS NULL
            AND Source.Field1 IS NOT NULL
    )
    OR
    (
        -- Source is null but target is not
        Target.Field1 IS NOT NULL
            AND Source.Field1 IS NULL
    )

    -- OR ... Repeat for other columns
)

Second attempt:

WHEN MATCHED AND
(
    -- Neither is null, values are not equal
    NOT (Target.Field1 IS NULL OR Source.Field1 IS NULL)
        AND Target.Field1 <> Source.Field1

    -- Source xor target is null
    OR (Target.Field1 IS NULL OR Source.Field1 IS NULL)
        AND NOT (Target.Field1 IS NULL AND Source.Field1 IS NULL)

    -- OR ... Repeat for other columns
)

Third attempt (inspired by @THEn's answer):

WHEN MATCHED AND
(

    ISNULL(
        NULLIF(Target.Field1, Source.Field1),
        NULLIF(Source.Field1, Target.Field1)
    ) IS NOT NULL

    -- OR ... Repeat for other columns
)

The same ISNULL/NULLIF logic can be used to test equality and inequality:

  • Equality: ISNULL(NULLIF(A, B), NULLIF(B, A)) IS NULL
  • Inequaltiy: ISNULL(NULLIF(A, B), NULLIF(B, A)) IS NOT NULL

Here is an SQL-Fiddle demonstrating how it works http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/471d60/1

5
  • 1
    I was attempting to solve this before Googling and managed to come up with NULLIF(A, B) IS NULL AND NULLIF(B, A) IS NULL (for Equality) and NOT'ing the whole mess with parens for inequality. Yours is 3 characters shorter for Equality and 4 characters shorter for Inequality, but I think mine is slightly easier to understand (although that's definitely relative in this case). Commented May 15, 2014 at 4:50
  • 1
    This is pretty unreadable so it's better to compare ISNULLed with impossible values if you can, but sometimes that's not a solution (i.e. when comparing NULLable bit columns). Sure would be nice if there was a built-in solution, but I think there's some ideological motivation to keep that kind of thing out of T-SQL to prevent people from using NULLs in the "wrong" way.
    – Tmdean
    Commented Jul 21, 2015 at 13:20
  • 1
    I think INTERSECT and EXCEPT provides nice methods to do equality/inequality searches as NULLs are handled as values... Commented Aug 4, 2015 at 11:24
  • 2
    Wonderful answer, but to me it demonstrates how 3-value logic is a completely inexcusable abomination for real-world usage, at least without a bunch more operators than exist in any SQL dialect.
    – Pxtl
    Commented Sep 26, 2019 at 19:20
  • 1
    @Pxtl ISO SQL has the IS DISTINCT FROM and IS NOT DISTINCT FROM operators ( modern-sql.com/feature/is-distinct-from ) - but it's waaay too verbose, and SQL Server still doesn't support it yet. I really like MySQL's use of <=> for IS DISTINCT FROM - though it doesn't have a succint IS NOT DISTINCT FROM syntax though.
    – Dai
    Commented Jun 1, 2020 at 2:31
35

Use ISNULL:

ISNULL(MY_FIELD1, 'NULL') = ISNULL(@IN_MY_FIELD1, 'NULL')

You can change 'NULL' to something like 'All Values' if it makes more sense to do so.

It should be noted that with two arguments, ISNULL works the same as COALESCE, which you could use if you have a few values to test (i.e.-COALESCE(@IN_MY_FIELD1, @OtherVal, 'NULL')). COALESCE also returns after the first non-null, which means it's (marginally) faster if you expect MY_FIELD1 to be blank. However, I find ISNULL much more readable, so that's why I used it, here.

6
  • 14
    What if the value of the field is 'NULL' ? Commented Jul 2, 2009 at 15:46
  • 2
    Use an alternative value which cannot occur, such as 'x' for a number field, or a too long string for a string field.
    – l0b0
    Commented Jul 2, 2009 at 15:48
  • 3
    @l0b0 Using a too long string will not work, as ISNULL will truncate the replacement value to match the size of the checked value.
    – Aaroninus
    Commented Jul 7, 2015 at 13:50
  • 1
    this will fail for integer (cannot convert varchar to int)
    – Muflix
    Commented Sep 14, 2018 at 12:47
  • 2
    This could cause problems for Jennifer Null: gizmodo.com/… Commented Nov 7, 2018 at 15:06
21
IF EXISTS(SELECT * FROM MY_TABLE WHERE 
            (MY_FIELD1 = @IN_MY_FIELD1 
                     or (MY_FIELD1 IS NULL and @IN_MY_FIELD1 is NULL))  AND
            (MY_FIELD2 = @IN_MY_FIELD2 
                     or (MY_FIELD2 IS NULL and @IN_MY_FIELD2 is NULL))  AND
            (MY_FIELD3 = @IN_MY_FIELD3 
                     or (MY_FIELD3 IS NULL and @IN_MY_FIELD3 is NULL))  AND
            (MY_FIELD4 = @IN_MY_FIELD4 
                     or (MY_FIELD4 IS NULL and @IN_MY_FIELD4 is NULL))  AND
            (MY_FIELD5 = @IN_MY_FIELD5 
                     or (MY_FIELD5 IS NULL and @IN_MY_FIELD5 is NULL))  AND
            (MY_FIELD6 = @IN_MY_FIELD6
                     or (MY_FIELD6 IS NULL and @IN_MY_FIELD6 is NULL)))
            BEGIN
                    goto on_duplicate
            END

Wordy As compared to the IFNULL/COALESCE solution. But will work without having to think about what value will not appear in the data that can be used as the stand in for NULL.

11

You could coalesce each value, but it's a bit wince-inducing:

    IF EXISTS(SELECT * FROM MY_TABLE WHERE 
    coalesce(MY_FIELD1,'MF1') = coalesce(@IN_MY_FIELD1,'MF1')  AND
    ...
    BEGIN
            goto on_duplicate
    END

You'd also need to ensure that the coalesced value is not an otherwise valid value on the column in question. For example, if it was possible that the value of MY_FIELD1 could be 'MF1' then this would cause a lot of spurious hits.

11

Equals comparison:

((f1 IS NULL AND f2 IS NULL) OR (f1 IS NOT NULL AND f2 IS NOT NULL AND f1 = f2))

Not Equal To comparison: Just negate the Equals comparison above.

NOT ((f1 IS NULL AND f2 IS NULL) OR (f1 IS NOT NULL AND f2 IS NOT NULL AND f1 = f2))

Is it verbose? Yes, it is. However it's efficient since it doesn't call any function. The idea is to use short circuit in predicates to make sure the equal operator (=) is used only with non-null values, otherwise null would propagate up in the expression tree.

1
  • 1
    As verbose as this is, it's the best answer. Many other answers return NULL instead of FALSE, and so will to be TRUE if negated.
    – Pxtl
    Commented Sep 26, 2019 at 19:18
7

What if you want to do a comparison for values that ARE NOT equal? Just using a "NOT" in front of the previously mentioned comparisons does not work. The best I could come up with is:

(Field1 <> Field2) OR (NULLIF(Field1, Field2) IS NOT NULL) OR (NULLIF(Field2, Field1) IS NOT NULL)
1
  • This approach doesn't work if both arguments are null. ` DECLARE @F1 AS BIT = NULL; DECLARE @F2 AS BIT = NULL; SELECT IIF((@F1 <> @F2) OR (NULLIF(@F1, @F2) IS NOT NULL) OR (NULLIF(@F2, @F1) IS NOT NULL), N'Yes', N'No') AS [Not Equal ?]; `
    – CalvinDale
    Commented Jun 26, 2022 at 17:19
6

You create a primary key on your fields and let the engine enforce the uniqueness. Doing IF EXISTS logic is incorrect anyway as is flawed with race conditions.

1
  • 1
    Or a unique constraint, since he's indicated that there's already a primary key
    – bdukes
    Commented Jul 2, 2009 at 15:59
2

You could use SET ANSI_NULLS in order to specify the behavior of the Equals (=) and Not Equal To (<>) comparison operators when they are used with null values.

1
  • 2
    NOTE: SET ANSI_NULLS ON affects a comparison only if one of the operands of the comparison is either a variable that is NULL or a literal NULL. If both sides of the comparison are columns or compound expressions, the setting does not affect the comparison. Source: learn.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/statements/… Commented Jul 15, 2022 at 11:03
1

Above, @drowa shows a verbose approach that I agree with. It's good because it avoids the 3-value logic problem. Many of the other approaches provided here will fail in subtle and unexpected ways when negated because they're treating null as equivalent to false which it is not.

However, I have a workflow that I find makes it convenient-ish, here's a regex. Given code of the form

(leftSide <=> rightSide)

regex find this:

\(([a-zA-Z0-9_.@]+)\s*<=>\s*([a-zA-Z0-9_.@]+)\)

and replace with this:

(/*$1 <=> $2*/ ($1 IS NULL AND $2 IS NULL) OR ($1 IS NOT NULL AND $2 IS NOT NULL AND $1 = $2))

So I write the (leftSide <=> rightSide) code and apply the above regex transformation to get the expanded form. It'd be nicer if MSSQL offered some kind of macro expansion so I wouldn't have to do it manually, but it doesn't.

@Drowa's answer quoted for reference:

Equals comparison:

((f1 IS NULL AND f2 IS NULL) OR (f1 IS NOT NULL AND f2 IS NOT NULL AND f1 = f2))

Not Equal To comparison: Just negate the Equals comparison above.

NOT ((f1 IS NULL AND f2 IS NULL) OR (f1 IS NOT NULL AND f2 IS NOT NULL AND f1 = f2))

Is it verbose? Yes, it is. However it's efficient since it doesn't call any function. The idea is to use short circuit in predicates to make sure the equal operator (=) is used only with non-null values, otherwise null would propagate up in the expression tree.

1

From SQL Server 2022 the "null safe" version of

WHERE 
    MY_FIELD1 = @IN_MY_FIELD1  AND
    MY_FIELD2 = @IN_MY_FIELD2  AND
    MY_FIELD3 = @IN_MY_FIELD3  AND 
    MY_FIELD4 = @IN_MY_FIELD4  AND
    MY_FIELD5 = @IN_MY_FIELD5  AND
    MY_FIELD6 = @IN_MY_FIELD6

would be

WHERE 
    MY_FIELD1 IS NOT DISTINCT FROM @IN_MY_FIELD1  AND
    MY_FIELD2 IS NOT DISTINCT FROM @IN_MY_FIELD2  AND
    MY_FIELD3 IS NOT DISTINCT FROM @IN_MY_FIELD3  AND 
    MY_FIELD4 IS NOT DISTINCT FROM @IN_MY_FIELD4  AND
    MY_FIELD5 IS NOT DISTINCT FROM @IN_MY_FIELD5  AND
    MY_FIELD6 IS NOT DISTINCT FROM @IN_MY_FIELD6

IS [NOT] DISTINCT FROM (Transact-SQL)

0

You will have to use IS NULL or ISNULL. There really isn't a away around it.

0
NULLIF(TARGET.relation_id, SOURCE.app_relation_id) IS NULL Simple solution
1
  • 4
    This does not work if the first value is null but the second value is not.
    – Aaroninus
    Commented Jul 7, 2015 at 14:09
-2

Did you check NULLIF? http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177562.aspx

1
  • 1
    This does not work in OP's case. Both: nullif(cast(null as varchar(max)), 'X') and nullif(cast(null as varchar(max)), null) return null
    – Warren
    Commented Jan 21, 2015 at 19:16

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