My code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Foo
{
public:
    int bar;

    Foo()
    {
        bar = 1;
        cout << "Foo() called" << endl;
    }

    Foo(int b)
    {
        bar = 0;
        Foo();
        bar += b;
        cout << "Foo(int) called" << endl;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Foo foo(5);
    cout << "foo.bar is " << foo.bar << endl;
}

The output:

Foo() called
Foo(int) called
foo.bar is 5

Why isn't the foo.bar value 6? Foo() is called but doesn't set bar to 1. Why?

  • 4
    Foo(); creates an unnamed temporary object and immediately destroys it. What is it that you expected to happen? – ildjarn May 25 '12 at 20:08
up vote 12 down vote accepted

In the following constructor, the line with Foo() does not delegate to the previous constructor. Instead, it creates a new temporary object of type Foo, unrelated to *this.

Foo(int b)
{
    bar = 0;
    Foo(); // NOTE: new temporary instead of delegation
    bar += b;
    cout << "Foo(int) called" << endl;
}

Constructor delegation works as follows:

Foo(int b)
    : Foo()
{
    bar += b;
    cout << "Foo(int) called" << endl;
}

However, this is only possible with C++11.

you can't use constructor like ordinary functions. in your code calling Foo() creates a new object in the stack.

Because you have this line in the constructor:

bar = 0;

You are trying to call the other constructor with Foo() call in the second constructor, but it just creates a temp Foo instance.

You're not supposed to call a constructor from another constructor

See

Can I call a constructor from another constructor (do constructor chaining) in C++?

Unless you're running C++11

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.