Possible Duplicate:
How do I expand a tuple into variadic template function's arguments?
“unpacking” a tuple to call a matching function pointer

In C++11 templates, is there a way to use a tuple as the individual args of a (possibly template) function?

Example:
Let's say I have this function:

void foo(int a, int b)  
{  
}

And I have the tuple auto bar = std::make_tuple(1, 2).

Can I use that to call foo(1, 2) in a templaty way?

I don't mean simply foo(std::get<0>(bar), std::get<1>(bar)) since I want to do this in a template that doesn't know the number of args.

More complete example:

template<typename Func, typename... Args>  
void caller(Func func, Args... args)  
{  
    auto argtuple = std::make_tuple(args...);  
    do_stuff_with_tuple(argtuple);  
    func(insert_magic_here(argtuple));  // <-- this is the hard part  
}

I should note that I'd prefer to not create one template that works for one arg, another that works for two, etc…

marked as duplicate by Daniel Earwicker, Joe Gauterin, Steve Jessop, KillianDS, ildjarn May 26 '12 at 15:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 3
    Sure. You want something like template <typename F, typename Tuple, int N...> call(F f, Tuple const & t) { f(std::get<N>(t)...); }. Now just fill in the blanks :-) – Kerrek SB May 26 '12 at 12:15
  • Do you mean skipping variadic templates and creating multiple caller() templates instead? – Thomas May 26 '12 at 12:17
  • @Thomas: You'll have to make a little dispatching harness that builds up the integer pack N..., and partially specializing when N == std::tuple_size<Tuple>::value, you want to call the original function in the way I suggested. – Kerrek SB May 26 '12 at 12:21
  • (It should have been int ...N, of course.) – Kerrek SB May 26 '12 at 12:59
up vote 58 down vote accepted

Try something like this:

// implementation details, users never invoke these directly
namespace detail
{
    template <typename F, typename Tuple, bool Done, int Total, int... N>
    struct call_impl
    {
        static void call(F f, Tuple && t)
        {
            call_impl<F, Tuple, Total == 1 + sizeof...(N), Total, N..., sizeof...(N)>::call(f, std::forward<Tuple>(t));
        }
    };

    template <typename F, typename Tuple, int Total, int... N>
    struct call_impl<F, Tuple, true, Total, N...>
    {
        static void call(F f, Tuple && t)
        {
            f(std::get<N>(std::forward<Tuple>(t))...);
        }
    };
}

// user invokes this
template <typename F, typename Tuple>
void call(F f, Tuple && t)
{
    typedef typename std::decay<Tuple>::type ttype;
    detail::call_impl<F, Tuple, 0 == std::tuple_size<ttype>::value, std::tuple_size<ttype>::value>::call(f, std::forward<Tuple>(t));
}

Example:

#include <cstdio>
int main()
{
    auto t = std::make_tuple("%d, %d, %d\n", 1,2,3);
    call(std::printf, t);
}

With some extra magic and using std::result_of, you can probably also make the entire thing return the correct return value.

  • 7
    This is fine as an exercise in template masturbation but do you really want to have to write call_impl<F, Tuple, 0 == std::tuple_size<ttype>::value, std::tuple_size<ttype>::value>::call(f, std::forward<Tuple>(t)) anywhere you want to expand a tuple? – Jonathan Wakely May 26 '12 at 15:34
  • 9
    @JonathanWakely : call_impl is an implementation detail -- users never call it directly, global call is all that users interface with. Is the example that unclear? – ildjarn May 26 '12 at 15:45
  • Ah no, I just hadn't looked properly, I thought call was a replacement for the OP's caller and so the unwieldy use of call_impl happened in the user's code. – Jonathan Wakely May 26 '12 at 15:54
  • 5
    That's the best way of unpacking std::tuple I've found on stackoverflow yet and it has half of the upvotes of much worse solutions... – cubuspl42 Dec 3 '12 at 13:43
  • 1
    Just a suggestion, you might wanna throw an auto in there for call so you can use the return value of a function as well, BTW other than that really like the solution – aaronman Sep 30 '13 at 22:14

Create an "index tuple" (a tuple of compile-time integers) then forward to another function that deduces the indices as a parameter pack and uses them in a pack expansion to call std::get on the tuple:

#include <redi/index_tuple.h>

template<typename Func, typename Tuple, unsigned... I>  
  void caller_impl(Func func, Tuple&& t, redi::index_tuple<I...>)  
  {  
    func(std::get<I>(t)...);
  }

template<typename Func, typename... Args>  
  void caller(Func func, Args... args)  
  {  
    auto argtuple = std::make_tuple(args...);  
    do_stuff_with_tuple(argtuple);
    typedef redi::to_index_tuple<Args...> indices;
    caller_impl(func, argtuple, indices());
  }

My implementation of index_tuple is at https://gitlab.com/redistd/redistd/blob/master/include/redi/index_tuple.h but it relies on template aliases so if your compiler doesn't support that you'd need to modify it to use C++03-style "template typedefs" and replace the last two lines of caller with

    typedef typename redi::make_index_tuple<sizeof...(Args)>::type indices;
    caller_impl(func, argtuple, indices());

A similar utility was standardised as std::index_sequence in C++14 (see index_seq.h for a standalone C++11 implementation).

  • can you please explain the type::template syntax ? – ubik Nov 3 '15 at 12:17
  • @JonathanWakely Very nice. Maybe I'm missing an obvious trick, but is there any way to apply a tuple like this when the function in question is a constructor... or is that asking for a little bit too much magic? :D – underscore_d Jan 17 '16 at 13:54
  • Hmm, think I've gotten it working by having the _impl function equivalent templated on T_ReturnedObject and getting it to call that object's ctor with all the stuff unpacked. I guess that was the "obvious trick" I mentioned! – underscore_d Jan 17 '16 at 14:57
  • @underscore_d, yes, that's the obvious way to do it. – Jonathan Wakely Jan 17 '16 at 18:59

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.