2

I am curious how recursion works in jvm. Follow the examples. First calculating factorial of given number.

public class Factorial {

public int factorial(int n) {
    System.out.println("Factorial: " + n);
    if ( n < 2) {
        return 1;
    } 

    return n * factorial(n - 1);
}

Executing following test

    @Test
public void test_factorial() {
    Factorial fact = new Factorial();
    System.out.println(fact.factorial(3));
}

displays

3
2
1

And it seems obvious, method calls are put in the stack, execution reaches n == 1 and it goes back. Now, I have tried to calculate fibonacci numbers.

public int fibo(String name, int n) {
    System.out.println("fibo: " + name +  " " + n);
    if (n < 2 ) {
        return n;
    }
    return fibo ("left", n - 1) + fibo ("right", n - 2);
}

Executing test

@Test
public void test_fibonacci() {
    Fibo fibo = new Fibo();

    assertEquals(8, fibo.fibo("start",6));

}

print what follows

fibo: start 6
fibo: left 5
fibo: left 4
fibo: left 3
fibo: left 2
fibo: left 1
fibo: right 0
fibo: right 1
fibo: right 2
fibo: left 1
fibo: right 0
fibo: right 3
fibo: left 2
fibo: left 1
fibo: right 0
fibo: right 1
fibo: right 4
fibo: left 3
fibo: left 2
fibo: left 1
fibo: right 0
fibo: right 1
fibo: right 2
fibo: left 1
fibo: right 0

My question is what is the rule of calling method and putting it in the stack in this example?

  • In the real world, avoid Fibonacci-style recursive programs, because they result in an exponential amount of method calls. – Paul Vargas May 26 '12 at 19:21
  • Draw yourself a tree of the function calls and that should make the behavior quite clear. To summarize: A function is called after all its parameters have been executed, parameters of a function are executed from left to right. – Voo May 26 '12 at 19:25
3

Statements are evaluated left-to-right in Java. Here's a simple breakdown of your Fibonacci function on a smaller input:

fib.fibo("start",3)

gets called, printing "start: 3". It tries to evaluate

(1) fibo("left", 2) + fibo("right", 1)

Since evaluation is LTR, this means that

(2) fibo("left", 2)

gets evaluated first. We make a new stack frame and statement (1) is waiting around for its return. Calling (2) prints "left: 2" and tries to evaluate

(3) fibo("left", 1) + fibo("right", 0)

Again, LTR evaluation means we evaluate

(4) fibo("left", 1)

first. Again, new stack frame, (3) awaits the response of (4). Calling (4) prints "left: 1" and returns 1. Stack frame pops, and (3) now continues its evaluation, calling

(5) fibo("right", 0)

This prints "right: 0" and returns 0. (2) is now able to complete its evaluation and return 1+0 = 1. Statement (1) finally has finished evaluating fibo("left", 2) and can continue on to evaluate fibo("right",1) in the same way as above.

I hope this helps some to clarify!

  • So the methods calls will not be symmetric (like 'alaster' proposed). In sense that most 'left' calls will be called often? (I do not know does this question make sense :) ) – David Warsow May 26 '12 at 20:21
  • No, every call to fibo will either return 1 or call fibo twice--once for the left and once for the right. Even in alaster's example tree you can see that the same number of left and right calls are made (3 each). – David Harkness May 26 '12 at 20:25
1

what's the problem? you change left to right and right to left while running this code(left1 has right2 inside):

             start
    left1           right1 
left2  right2    left3  right3 

you call left1 first, then left2. Then return to left1, but not printing it and then you call right2. Then return two times and you are in start again. After that you call right1 and it will be analogically.

So you have: start - left1 - left2 - right2 - right1 - left3 - right3

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.