120

I have a list A, and a function f which takes an item of A and returns a list. I can use a list comprehension to convert everything in A like [f(a) for a in A], but this returns a list of lists. Suppose my input is [a1,a2,a3], resulting in [[b11,b12],[b21,b22],[b31,b32]].

How can I get the flattened list [b11,b12,b21,b22,b31,b32] instead? In other words, in Python, how can I get what is traditionally called flatmap in functional programming languages, or SelectMany in .NET?

(In the actual code, A is a list of directories, and f is os.listdir. I want to build a flat list of subdirectories.)


See also: How do I make a flat list out of a list of lists? for the more general problem of flattening a list of lists after it's been created.

0

18 Answers 18

168

You can have nested iterations in a single list comprehension:

[filename for path in dirs for filename in os.listdir(path)]

which is equivalent (at least functionally) to:

filenames = []
for path in dirs:
    for filename in os.listdir(path):
        filenames.append(filename)
13
  • 98
    Although clever, that is hard to understand and not very readable. Oct 20, 2014 at 23:01
  • 3
    Doesn't really answer the question as asked. This is rather a workaround for not encountering the problem in the first place. What if you already have a list of lists. For example, what if your list of lists is a result of the multiprocessing module's map function? Perhaps the itertools solution or the reduce solution is best.
    – Dave31415
    Jan 22, 2015 at 3:43
  • 36
    Dave31415: [ item for list in listoflists for item in list ]
    – rampion
    Feb 6, 2015 at 19:53
  • 20
    'readability' is a subjective judgment. I find this solution quite readable.
    – Reb.Cabin
    May 22, 2015 at 23:13
  • 25
    I thought it was readable too, until I saw the order of the terms... :(
    – c z
    May 10, 2017 at 15:14
96
>>> from functools import reduce  # not needed on Python 2
>>> list_of_lists = [[1, 2],[3, 4, 5], [6]]
>>> reduce(list.__add__, list_of_lists)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

The itertools solution is more efficient, but this feels very pythonic.

1
  • 5
    For a list of 1,000 sublists, this is 100 times slower that the itertools way and the difference only gets worse as your list grows.
    – user3064538
    May 7, 2022 at 7:54
73

You can find a good answer in the itertools recipes:

import itertools

def flatten(list_of_lists):
    return list(itertools.chain.from_iterable(list_of_lists))
1
40

The question proposed flatmap. Some implementations are proposed but they may unnecessary creating intermediate lists. Here is one implementation that's based on iterators.

def flatmap(func, *iterable):
    return itertools.chain.from_iterable(map(func, *iterable))

In [148]: list(flatmap(os.listdir, ['c:/mfg','c:/Intel']))
Out[148]: ['SPEC.pdf', 'W7ADD64EN006.cdr', 'W7ADD64EN006.pdf', 'ExtremeGraphics', 'Logs']

In Python 2.x, use itertools.map in place of map.

24

You could just do the straightforward:

subs = []
for d in dirs:
    subs.extend(os.listdir(d))
1
  • Yep, this is fine (though not quite as good as @Ants') so I'm giving it a +1 to honor its simplicity! Jul 3, 2009 at 1:31
16

You can concatenate lists using the normal addition operator:

>>> [1, 2] + [3, 4]
[1, 2, 3, 4]

The built-in function sum will add the numbers in a sequence and can optionally start from a specific value:

>>> sum(xrange(10), 100)
145

Combine the above to flatten a list of lists:

>>> sum([[1, 2], [3, 4]], [])
[1, 2, 3, 4]

You can now define your flatmap:

>>> def flatmap(f, seq):
...   return sum([f(s) for s in seq], [])
... 
>>> flatmap(range, [1,2,3])
[0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 2]

Edit: I just saw the critique in the comments for another answer and I guess it is correct that Python will needlessly build and garbage collect lots of smaller lists with this solution. So the best thing that can be said about it is that it is very simple and concise if you're used to functional programming :-)

0
10
subs = []
map(subs.extend, (os.listdir(d) for d in dirs))

(but Ants's answer is better; +1 for him)

2
  • Using reduce (or sum, which saves you many characters and an import;-) for this is just wrong -- you keep uselessly tossing away old lists to make a new one for each d. @Ants has the right answer (smart of @Steve to accept it!). Jul 3, 2009 at 1:28
  • You can't say in general that this is a bad solution. It depends on whether performance is even an issue. Simple is better unless there is a reason to optimize. That's why the reduce method could be best for many problems. For example you have a slow function that produces a list of a few hundred objects. You want to speed it up by using multiprocessing 'map' function. So you create 4 processes and use reduce to flat map them. In this case the reduce function is fine and very readable. That said, it's good that you point out why this can be suboptimal. But it is not always suboptimal.
    – Dave31415
    Jan 22, 2015 at 3:48
10
import itertools
x=[['b11','b12'],['b21','b22'],['b31']]
y=list(itertools.chain(*x))
print y

itertools will work from python2.3 and greater

5

You could try itertools.chain(), like this:

import itertools
import os
dirs = ["c:\\usr", "c:\\temp"]
subs = list(itertools.chain(*[os.listdir(d) for d in dirs]))
print subs

itertools.chain() returns an iterator, hence the passing to list().

4

This is the most simple way to do it:

def flatMap(array):
  return reduce(lambda a,b: a+b, array) 

The 'a+b' refers to concatenation of two lists

1

You can use pyxtension:

from pyxtension.streams import stream
stream([ [1,2,3], [4,5], [], [6] ]).flatMap() == range(7)
4
  • Can this directly replace a list comprehension like [f(a) for a in A] (where f returns a list)? Or does it only flatten a list of lists after the fact? Sep 10, 2022 at 8:39
  • @KarlKnechtel -it actually do both: it can replace the list comprehension with applying a function f in this way: stream([ [1,2,3], [4,5], [], [6] ]).flatMap( f ) AND it returns a flatten list after that, with f applied over the elements of the flattened list
    – asu
    Sep 12, 2022 at 17:44
  • As far as I can tell, the question is specifically about replacing a list comprehension, since otherwise it would be a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/952914. Mind editing to show a more appropriate example? Sep 13, 2022 at 11:26
  • @KarlKnechtel Yes, you are right - I indeed missed the spec that f returns a list. Can't edit the answer, so will post a new answer here: No - it can't directly replace that list comprehension, as [f(a) for a in A] (where f returns a list)? is simply a mapping, which would be equivalent to stream(A).map( f ), while stream(A).flatMap( f ) would be equivalent of stream(A).map( f ).flatMap() - I hope this is slightly more clear.
    – asu
    Sep 14, 2022 at 16:44
0

Google brought me next solution:

def flatten(l):
   if isinstance(l,list):
      return sum(map(flatten,l))
   else:
      return l
2
  • 2
    Would be a little better if it handled generator expressions too, and would be a lot better if you explained how to use it...
    – ephemient
    Jul 3, 2009 at 4:45
  • This answer belongs on stackoverflow.com/questions/2158395 instead, but it would likely be a duplicate there. Sep 10, 2022 at 8:39
0

I was looking for flatmap and found this question first. flatmap is basically a generalization of what the original question asks for. If you are looking for a concise way of defining flatmap for summable collections such as lists you can use

sum(map(f,xs),[])

It's only a little longer than just writing

flatmap(f,xs)

but also potentially less clear at first.

The sanest solution would be to have flatmap as a basic function inside the programming language but as long as it is not, you can still define it using a better or more concrete name:

# `function` must turn the element type of `xs` into a summable type.
# `function` must be defined for arguments constructed without parameters.
def aggregate(function, xs):
    return sum( map(function, xs), type(function( type(xs)() ))() )

# or only for lists
aggregate_list = lambda f,xs: sum(map(f,xs),[])

Strings are not summable unfortunately, it won't work for them.
You can do

assert( aggregate_list( lambda x: x * [x], [2,3,4] ) == [2,2,3,3,3,4,4,4,4] )

but you can't do

def get_index_in_alphabet(character):
    return (ord(character) & ~0x20) - ord('A')

assert(aggregate( lambda x: get_index_in_alphabet(x) * x, "abcd") == "bccddd")

For strings, you need to use

aggregate_string = lambda f,s: "".join(map(f,s))  # looks almost like sum(map(f,s),"")

assert( aggregate_string( lambda x: get_index_in_alphabet(x) * x, "abcd" ) == "bccddd" )

It's obviously a mess, requiring different function names and even syntax for different types. Hopefully, Python's type system will be improved in the future.

0

You can also use the flatten function using numpy:

import numpy as np

matrix = [[i+k for i in range(10)] for k in range(10)]
matrix_flat = np.array(arr).flatten()

numpy documentation flatten

0

Why not flatten and flat_map functions appliable to any iterable using generators?

def flatten(iters):
    for it in iters:
        for elem in it:
            yield elem

def flat_map(fn, it):
    return flatten(map(fn, it))

Usage is very simple:

for e in flat_map(range, [1, 2, 3]):
    print(e, end=" ")
# Output: 0 0 1 0 1 2

As an interesting trivia, you can write flatten in a recursive manner aswell. Analysis left to the interested reader!

def flatten(it):
    try:
        yield from next(it)
        yield from flatten(it)
    except StopIteration:
        pass
0

Recursion can effectively flatten any nested list structure. Below is an example code snippet:

lst = [1,2,4, [3,2,5,6], [1,5,6,[9,20,23,45]]]

def flatten_list(l):
  flat_data = []
  for i in l:
    if type(i) != list:    # or you can use:  if isinstance(i, list):
      flat_data.append(i)
    else:
      flat_data.extend(flatten_list(i))
  return flat_data

print(flatten_list(lst))

In this code, the flatten_list function recursively traverses the nested list, appending non-list elements to the flat_data list. When encountering nested lists, it calls itself recursively until all elements are flattened. This approach ensures that any level of nesting within the list is handled effectively, resulting in a single flattened list as the output.

0

Recursion can effectively flatten any nested list structure. Below is an example code snippet:

lst = [1,2,4, [3,2,5,6], [1,5,6,[9,20,23,45]]]

def flatten_list(l):
  flat_data = []
  for i in l:
    if type(i) != list:    # or you can use:  if isinstance(i, list):
      flat_data.append(i)
    else:
      flat_data.extend(flatten_list(i))
  return flat_data

print(flatten_list(lst))

In this code, the flatten_list function recursively traverses the nested list, appending non-list elements to the flat_data list. When encountering nested lists, it calls itself recursively until all elements are flattened.

-2
If listA=[list1,list2,list3]
flattened_list=reduce(lambda x,y:x+y,listA)

This will do.

1
  • This is a very inefficient solution if the sublists are large. The + operator between two lists is O(n+m) Apr 27, 2017 at 23:42

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