11

Sorry this is such a long question.

Ive been doing lots of research lately into multi-threading as I slowly implement it into a personal project. However, probably due to an abundance of slightly incorrect examples, the use of synchronized blocks and volatility in certain situations is still a bit unclear to me.

My core question is this: Are changes to references and primitives automatically volatile (that is, performed on the main memory and not a cache) when a thread is inside a synchronized block, or does the read also have to be synchronized for it to work properly?

  1. If so What is the purpose of synchronizing a simple getter method? (see example 1 ) Also, are ALL changes sent to main memory as long as the thread has synchronized on anything? eg if it is sent off to do loads of work all over the place inside a very high level sync will every single change then made be to main memory, and nothing ever to cache, until its unlocked again?
  2. If not Does the change have to be explicitly inside a synchronized block, or can java actually pick up on, for example, uses of the Lock object? (see example 3)
  3. If either Does the synchronized object need to be related to the reference/primitive being changed in any way (eg the immediate object that contains it)? Can I write by syncing on one object and read with another if its otherwise safe? (see example 2)

(please note for the following examples that I know that synchronized methods and synchronized(this) are frowned upon and why, but discussion about that is beyond the scope of my question)

Example 1:

class Counter{
  int count = 0;

  public synchronized void increment(){
    count++;
  }

  public int getCount(){
    return count;
  }
}

In this example, increment() needs to be synchronized since ++ is not an atomic operation. As such, two threads incremending at the same time may result in a overall increase of 1 to the count. The count primitive needs to be atomic (eg not long/double/reference), and it is so thats fine.

Does getCount() need to be synchronized here and why exactly? The explanation I have heard the most is that I will have no guarantee whether the count returned will be the pre- or post-increment. However, this seems like the explanation for something slightly different, thats found itself in the wrong place. I mean if I were to synchronize getCount(), then I still see no guarantee - its now down to not knowing the locking order, insead of not knowing whether the actual read happens to be before/after the actual write.

Example 2:

Is the following example threadsafe, if you assume that through trickery not shown here that none of these methods will never be called at the same time? Will count increment in an expected way if its done so using a random method each time, and then be read properly, or does the lock have to be the same object? (btw I fully realise how rediculous this example is but Im more interested in theory than practice)

class Counter{
  private final Object lock1 = new Object();
  private final Object lock2 = new Object();
  private final Object lock3 = new Object();
  int count = 0;

  public void increment1(){
    synchronized(lock1){
      count++;
    }
  }

  public void increment2(){
    synchronized(lock2){
      count++;
    }
  }

  public int getCount(){
    synchronized(lock3){
      return count;
    }
  }

}

Example 3:

Is the happens-before relationship simply a java concept, or is it an actual thing built into the JVM? Even though I can guarantee a conceptual happens-before relationship for this next example, is java smart enough to pick it up if its a built in thing? I am assuming it is not, but is this example actually threadsafe? If its threadsafe, what about if getCount() did no locking?

class Counter{
  private final Lock lock = new Lock();
  int count = 0;

  public void increment(){
    lock.lock();
    count++;
    lock.unlock();
  }

  public int getCount(){
    lock.lock();
    int count = this.count;
    lock.unlock();
    return count;
  }
}
8

Yes, the read has to be synchronized as well. This page says:

The results of a write by one thread are guaranteed to be visible to a read by another thread only if the write operation happens-before the read operation.

[...]

An unlock (synchronized block or method exit) of a monitor happens-before every subsequent lock (synchronized block or method entry) of that same monitor

The same page says:

Actions prior to "releasing" synchronizer methods such as Lock.unlock, Semaphore.release, and CountDownLatch.countDown happen-before actions subsequent to a successful "acquiring" method such as Lock.lock

So locks offer the same visibility guarantees as synchronized blocks.

Whether you use synchronized blocks or locks, the visibility is only guaranteed if the reader thread uses the same monitor or lock as the writer thread.

  • Your Example 1 is incorrect: the getter must be synchronized as well if you want to see the latest value of the count.

  • Your example 2 is incorrect because it uses different locks to guard the same count.

  • Your example 3 is OK. If the getter did not lock, you could see an older value of the count. The happens-before is something that is guaranteed by the JVM. The JVM has to respect the rules specified, by flushing caches to the main memory for example.

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  • I think what I am getting from this is that if a thread A synchronizes an object, and then thread B synchronizes the same object - at that point, thread B will have all of the "memory view" thread A has, and that the variables changed during the lock has no relationship to it at all? Will the thread A cache retroactively sync up with thread B's when this happens, or is it one way? – Numeron May 28 '12 at 8:10
  • It is one way. When B enters its synchronized block, it's sure to see all the changes that happened in A before A released the monitor. B won't necessarily see all the changes that happened in A after A released the monitor. – JB Nizet May 28 '12 at 8:15
  • Thanks, that clicks a lot of things into place for me. – Numeron May 28 '12 at 8:17
6

Try to view it in terms of two distinct, simple operations:

  1. Locking (mutual exclusion),
  2. Memory barrier (cache sync, instruction reordering barrier).

Entering a synchronized block entails both locking and memory barrier; leaving the synchronized block entails unlocking + memory barrier; reading/writing a volatile field entails memory barrier only. Thinking in these terms I think you can clarify for yourself all the question above.

As for Example 1, the reading thread will not have any kind of memory barrier. It's not just between seeing the value before/after read, it's about never observing any change to the var after a thread is started.

Example 2. is the most interesting issue you raise. You are indeed given no guarantees by the JLS in this case. In practice you won't be given any ordering guarantees (it's as if the locking aspect wasn't there at all), but you'll still have the benefit of the memory barriers so you will observe changes, unlike the first example. Basically, this is exactly the same as removing synchronized and tagging the int as volatile (apart from the runtime costs of acquiring locks).

Regarding Example 3, by "just a Java thing" I feel you have generics with erasure in mind, something that only the static code checking is aware of. This is not like that -- both locks and memory barriers are pure runtime artifacts. In fact, the compiler can't reason about them at all.

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  • I disagree with you on example 2: you don't have any visibility guarantee because the reader doesn't synchronize on the same monitor than the writer. See my answer. – JB Nizet May 28 '12 at 8:07
  • @JBNizet The JLS doesn't give you any guarantee (I said as much in the answer), however I don't see how in practice you could build a system that would behave any different from what I've stated. It would have to be specifically designed to malfunction. – Marko Topolnik May 28 '12 at 8:09
  • I have no idea, because I don't know anything about hardware, processor caches, etc. But I would guess that Sun/Oracle engineers do, and that if they insisted on "that same monitor", there was a good reason. If it was completely impossible, they could have provided better visibility guarantees. But they haven't. – JB Nizet May 28 '12 at 8:12
  • @JBNizet I disagree with that assessment of Sun's engineers. The JLS is carefully written so as to minimally burden the implementor, still providing useful guarantees. They had zero reason to cover what I'm talking about with a hard guarantee since relying on such behavior would be an evil misuse of thread coordination primitives. However, it just so happens that, while satisfying the mandated guarantees, you'll get this behavior as a side-effect. – Marko Topolnik May 28 '12 at 8:20

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