39

It look like set tabstop=4 in VIM, but I don't know how to set it in bash

for example:

echo -e "1234567890\t321\n1\t2\n123\t1"

current output:

1234567890      321
1       2
123     1

I want output like this:

1234567890  321
1   2
123 1

It can be shown in anywhere, just like cat somefile or php -r 'echo "\t123";'

How can I set tab width in bash?

1
  • It seems as if you can't change it (that's the answers I found). You could do spaces instead, but I guess you know that :p
    – keyser
    May 28, 2012 at 10:06

6 Answers 6

78

That's not a property of your shell (or php or cat). It's your terminal that manages the output.

Use the tabs command to change the behavior:

$ tabs 4

$ echo -e "a\tb"      
a   b
$ tabs 12

$ echo -e "a\tb" 
a           b

(tabs is specified in POSIX, and output above is "faked": it's still a tab character between the two letters.)

4
  • 5
    A note: =tabs= is specified in Unix (POSIX with XSI option), not POSIX. Systems that conform to POSIX but not to Unix are not required to implement a =tabs= command. Sep 11, 2012 at 15:11
  • 6
    Addition: Pager "less" is not affected, so use "less -x4"; For "git diff" use "git config --global core.pager 'less -x4'"
    – Mikl
    Jul 10, 2014 at 17:52
  • it doesn't effect vi editor on macOS terminal ssh Linux
    – Necktwi
    Feb 4, 2018 at 8:29
  • @neckTwi: vi has its own settings
    – Mat
    Feb 4, 2018 at 8:35
1

You can set either regular or irregular intervals using the tabs utility. It will work whether you're doing your own output, using cat to output a file that already includes tabs or using the output of a program you don't control.

However, if you're controlling your output it's preferable to use printf instead of echo and format strings instead of tabs.

$ printf '%-12s%8.4f %-8s%6.2f\n' 'Some text' 23.456 'abc def' 11.22
Some text    23.4560 abc def  11.22
$ format='%*s%*.*f %*s%*.*f\n'
$ printf "$format" -12 'Some text' 8 4 23.456 -8 'abc def' 6 2 11.22
Some text    23.4560 abc def  11.22

Unless you want someone else to be able to control the output of your program using the tabs utility.

1

You can use setterm to set this

setterm -regtabs 4

I put it in my .bash_profile but its not bash related specifically

2
  • setterm: terminal screen-256color does not support --regtabs
    – Jack Wasey
    Aug 29, 2019 at 10:31
  • 1
    I got a similar result too: setterm: terminal xterm does not support --regtabs
    – spaceman
    Feb 12, 2020 at 20:45
1

tabs 4 results in the following tabstop positions. Which isn't quite what you asked for.

tab stop positions 4,8,12,16,20,24,28,32,36,40,44,48,52,56,60,64,68,72,76,80
         1         2         3         4         5         6         7         8
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *

You asked for this..

tab stop positions 5,9,13,17,21,25,29,33,37,41,45,49,53,57,61,65,69,73,77,80
         1         2         3         4         5         6         7         8
12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890
    *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *  *

Specifying tabs with a single number creates an implicit list that starts from 0.
To create an explicit list such as what you asked for. Provide a comma or space separated list of tab stop positions.
Like so: tabs 5,9,13,17,21,25,29,33,37,41,45,49,53,57,61,65,69,73,77

See man tabs and tabs -v for more details.

0

This works for me.

~/.bash_profile

# Set the tab stops
if [ -f ~/.bash_tab_stops ]; then
    . ~/.bash_tab_stops
fi

~/.bash_tab_stops

tab_width=4
terminal_width=$( stty size | awk '{print $2}' )

set_tab_stops() {
    local tab_width=$1 terminal_width=$2 tab_stops=''
    for (( i=1+$tab_width; $i<$terminal_width; i+=$tab_width )); do
        tab_stops+=$i','
    done
    tabs $tab_stops
}

set_tab_stops $tab_width $terminal_width

GNU bash, version 4.2.46(2)-release (x86_64-redhat-linux-gnu)
PuTTY Release 0.73 Build platform: 64-bit x86 Windows
Linux VPS 3.10.0-1127.18.2.el7.centos.plus.x86_64

0

If you want an offset for the first tab (e.g. for git diff) you can use shell expansion to get stepped numbers:

tabs {5..300..4}

In the above, 5 is the first tab's width, the second number is your terminal width, the last is your regular tab width.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.