35

Is there a way to digitally sign a x509 certificate or any document using openssl?

42

Yes, the dgst and rsautl component of OpenSSL can be used to compute a signature given an RSA key pair.

Signing:

openssl dgst -sha256 data.txt > hash
openssl rsautl -sign -inkey privatekey.pem -keyform PEM -in hash >signature

Verifying just the signature:

openssl rsautl -verify -inkey publickey.pem -pubin -keyform PEM -in signature

Update: Capturing Reto's comments from below because this is an important nuance. Presumably if you are going to the trouble to verify, you want to know the signature was produced on the plaintext to which it is attached:

This might sound obvious for some but: Be aware, rsault verify just decrypts the file signature. The output of this call is guaranteed to be produced by the owner of the private key, but beside that nothing else is being checked. So to actually verify the consistency of data.txt you have to regenerate the digest and then compare it against the output of openssl rsautl -verify.

Verifying that the owner of the private key does vouch for data.txt:

openssl dgst -sha256 -verify publickey.pem -signature signature data.txt

For this operation, openssl requires the public key, the signature, and the message.

  • 4
    This will leave a hex/ascii form of the hash in the file "hash", if you wanted a binary version of the hash to be signed, you need to use "-binary" on the openssl dgst command line. – davenpcj Apr 16 '13 at 0:50
  • 6
    My version of openssl also required -pubin for verify to work. – AKX Aug 21 '13 at 8:17
  • 17
    This might sound obvious for some but: Be aware, rsault verify just decrypts the file signature. The output of this call is guaranteed to be produced by the owner of the private key, but beside that nothing else is being checked. So to actually verify the consistency of data.txt you have to regenerate the digest and then compare it against the ouptut of openssl rsautl -verify. – reto Aug 21 '13 at 12:54
  • When security tools give a syntactically correct answer while doing something counter-intuitive it tends to lead to systems that fail silently and bad outcomes. I figured the comment from @reto needed more visibility so I copied it to the answer. – T.Rob Aug 7 '15 at 14:39
  • 1
    Unfortunately an artifact of Stack Overflow makes that somewhat unlikely to happen. Since this answer is the accepted one, it'll continue to be more visible than yours. I did at least vote yours up. – T.Rob Aug 7 '15 at 14:49
54

Alternative way to sign/verify a single, inspired by Anders Lindahl's answer.

to sign

openssl dgst -sha256 -sign snakeoil.key -out some-file.sha256 some-file 

to verify

# dgst -verify requires the public key
openssl x509 -in snakeoil.crt -pubkey -noout > snakeoil.pub

openssl dgst -sha256  -verify  snakeoil.pub -signature some-file.sha256 some-file

# in case of success: prints "Verified OK"
# in case of failure: prints "Verification Failure", return code 1

# or compact (requires a modern shell)
openssl dgst -sha256  \
    -verify  <(openssl x509 -in snakeoil.crt -pubkey -noout) \
    -signature some-file.sha256 some-file
  • This helped - I had the crt file, but didn't know how to go about verifying without the .pub file. Now I know ;-) – nemesisfixx Jul 16 '14 at 7:52
  • 1
    To clarify, some-file.sha256 is actually the signature (e.g. signature.txt), and some-file is actually the message to be signed (e.g. message.txt). So in both operations, some-file is an input file. In the -sign operation, signature.txt is an output file, and in the -verify operation, signature.txt is an input file. I would edit it, but I'll let you do that if you wish. – toddmo May 14 '18 at 0:23
  • @reto Is some-file.sha256 is a binary file? is this normal? Since after doing so I got a content of a file that looks like this @ugڻ��^{�{�9T�*�xAO"kd{�����d������͊��(����k�,A'c;�&�g��[b��e�i:��hh0���^���:�Y@��e�$��A������-�?�'� After executing the given command: openssl dgst -sha256 -sign snakeoil.key -out some-file.sha256 some-file – Roel Mar 26 at 15:13
  • 1
    @Roel It is normal and expected. – smileycreations15 2 days ago
5

To digitally sign document in openssl it will work

For this first your certificate should be trusted it would be look like this

-----BEGIN TRUSTED CERTIFICATE-----
MIIDbjCCAlYCCQCOyunl25ProDANBgkqhkiG9w0BAQUFADB5MQswCQYDVQQGEwJJ
...
-----END TRUSTED CERTIFICATE-----

Then use following command

smime -sign -signer certificate.pem -inkey private.key -in test.txt \
    -out test1.txt -from ashish -to singhal

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