12

In the source for JDK 1.6, the Collections class' swap method is written like this:

public static void swap(List<?> list, int i, int j) {
    final List l = list;
    l.set(i, l.set(j, l.get(i)));
}

What reason is there for creating a final copy of the passed list? Why don't they simply modify the passed list directly? In this case, you also get the raw type warning.

18

There is no copy of the list, there is only a copy of the reference to the list. The final keyword is not important. However, it is important that a raw type is used. If the parameter would be used instead, the compiler would report an error:

public static void swap(List<?> list, int i, int j) {
    // ERROR: The method set(int, capture#3-of ?) in the type List<capture#3-of ?>
    // is not applicable for the arguments (int, capture#4-of ?)
    list.set(i, list.set(j, list.get(i)));
}

This means, that they are using the intermediate variable to circumvent the shortcomings of generics, and to get rid of the error message.

The interesting question is: Why don't they use a generic method? The following code works:

public static <T> void swap(List<T> list, int i, int j) {
    list.set(i, list.set(j, list.get(i)));
}

The answer is, that this method produces warnings in old code invoking the method with raw types:

List list = ...;
// WARNING: Type safety: Unchecked invocation swap2(List, int, int)
// of the generic method swap2(List<T>, int, int) of type Swap
Collections.swap(list, 0, 1);
  • So they use the final reference to the list to avoid using generics? – Sotirios Delimanolis May 28 '12 at 17:52
  • 1
    Indeed, they are using the intermediate variable to circumvent the shortcomings of generics, and to get rid of the error message. – nosid May 28 '12 at 18:08
  • 3
    The API shouldn't be polluted with the implementation detail of a method with a generic parameter where a wildcard would suffice (and be cleaner and easier to understand, assuming a basic knowledge of Java). Now, you could use the generic method as a implementation method and have the public method call that (a common idiom), however, I suspect the extra bytecode may occasionally trip up HotSpot inlining (or someone was concerned about that even if it doesn't). – Tom Hawtin - tackline May 28 '12 at 18:11
  • 2
    @SotiriosDelimanolis No, the reference being final has nothing to do with it. It's just generally good practice to have final vars and in some cases helps the JIT compiler to make more efficient code. – Marko Topolnik May 28 '12 at 18:11

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