46

I am trying to implement to search for a value in Python dictionary for specific key values (using regular expression as a key).

Example:

I have a Python dictionary which has values like:

{'account_0':123445,'seller_account':454545,'seller_account_0':454676, 'seller_account_number':3433343}

I need to search for values whose key has 'seller_account'? I wrote a sample program but would like to know if something can be done better. Main reason is I am not sure of regular expression and miss out something (like how do I set re for key starting with 'seller_account'):

#!usr/bin/python
import re
my_dict={'account_0':123445,'seller_account':454545,'seller_account_0':454676, 'seller_account_number':3433343}

reObj = re.compile('seller_account')

for key in my_dict.keys():
        if(reObj.match(key)):
                print key, my_dict[key]

~ home> python regular.py

seller_account_number 3433343
seller_account_0 454676
seller_account 454545
2
  • If you have to search frequently for such parts of keys, there's probably something wrong with your data structure.
    – eumiro
    May 29, 2012 at 9:03
  • 7
    Whenever I run across comments like eumiro's, I get the impression someone imagines a perfect, holistic world in which the OP has complete control over all aspects of her work. Do you really think that @Programmer has control of the data structure being received? Unless it was a school project, I highly doubt it. Jul 14, 2020 at 14:51

5 Answers 5

53

If you only need to check keys that are starting with "seller_account", you don't need regex, just use startswith()

my_dict={'account_0':123445,'seller_account':454545,'seller_account_0':454676, 'seller_account_number':3433343}

for key, value in my_dict.iteritems():   # iter on both keys and values
        if key.startswith('seller_account'):
                print key, value

or in a one_liner way :

result = [(key, value) for key, value in my_dict.iteritems() if key.startswith("seller_account")]

NB: for a python 3.X use, replace iteritems() by items() and don't forget to add () for print.

4
  • 3
    To make result being a dictionary again, you can use dict() or (in Python 2.7) {...} instead of the list comprehension [...]. May 29, 2012 at 9:27
  • 5
    Just in Python3 you have to use items() instead of iteritems()
    – Arash
    Oct 2, 2019 at 12:45
  • 1
    But then you are losing the efficiency of a dictionary, aren't you? Access is not O(1) any more since you have to do a for loop over the dictionary elements.
    – user5054
    Apr 15, 2021 at 21:32
  • 1
    Your manually searching every key anyway, so that efficiency isn't really doing much for us
    – Shayne
    Apr 25, 2021 at 8:03
11

You can solve this with dpath.

http://github.com/akesterson/dpath-python

dpath lets you search dictionaries with a glob syntax on the keys, and to filter the values. What you want is trivial:

$ easy_install dpath
>>> dpath.util.search(MY_DICT, 'seller_account*')

... That will return you a big merged dictionary of all the keys matching that glob. If you just want the paths and values:

$ easy_install dpath
>>> for (path, value) in dpath.util.search(MY_DICT, 'seller_account*', yielded=True):
>>> ... # do something with the path and value
2
  • 5
    Andrew, I'd be careful with posting without disclosure. All of your answers are about dpath. You obviously seem fond (or part of) dpath; if you are, I'd like to remind you that it is mandatory to disclose your affiliation.
    – Jesse
    May 12, 2013 at 14:37
  • 17
    Judging from the github url, it seems that Andrew is the main author of dpath. I don't see anything wrong with it, given that it's MIT licensed software.
    – dalloliogm
    Feb 24, 2015 at 17:05
8
def search(dictionary, substr):
    result = []
    for key in dictionary:
        if substr in key:
            result.append((key, dictionary[key]))   
    return result

>>> my_dict={'account_0':123445,'seller_account':454545,'seller_account_0':454676, 'seller_account_number':3433343}
>>> search(my_dict, 'seller_account')
[('seller_account_number', 3433343), ('seller_account_0', 454676), ('seller_account', 454545)]
1
  • 1
    You can make the search a bit more generic by making it case insensitive, for example by casting the search term and keys to lower case: if substr.lower() in key.lower() Aug 14, 2014 at 11:21
4

You can use a combination of "re" and "filter". for example, if you want to search which methods have the word "stat" in their method name in the os module you can use the code below.

import re 
import os
r = re.compile(".*stat.*")
list(filter(r.match, os.__dict__.keys()))

result is:

['stat', 'lstat', 'fstat', 'fstatvfs', 'statvfs', 'stat_result', 'statvfs_result']

I think the performance issue in the original question is the key_value search after the keys have been found with the "re" module. if a portion of the key is interchangeable we can't use "startswith". so "re" is a good choice. plus I use a filter to get a list of all matched keys and make a list of them so we can return all values with simple [DICT[k] for k in LIST].

3
  • May I ask what your answer has to do with the original question which was about searching dictionaries? Mar 5, 2021 at 23:04
  • 1
    I think the performance issue in the original question is the key_value search after the keys have been founded with "re" module.if a portion of the key is interchangeable we can't use "startswith" so "re" is a good choice. plus I use filter to get a list of all matched keys and make a list of them so we can return all values with simple [DICT[k] for k in LIST]. Mar 6, 2021 at 11:31
  • @EhsanAhmadi you should add your comment to the answer to make it more precise
    – Clintm
    Dec 28, 2021 at 18:57
0

like how do I set re for key starting with 'seller_account'

reObj = re.compile('seller_account')

should be:

reObj = re.compile('seller_account.*')

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