132

I would like to lookup an enum from its string value (or possibly any other value). I've tried the following code but it doesn't allow static in initialisers. Is there a simple way?

public enum Verbosity {

    BRIEF, NORMAL, FULL;

    private static Map<String, Verbosity> stringMap = new HashMap<String, Verbosity>();

    private Verbosity() {
        stringMap.put(this.toString(), this);
    }

    public static Verbosity getVerbosity(String key) {
        return stringMap.get(key);
    }
};
  • IIRC, that gives an NPE because the static initialisation is done top down (i.e. the enum constants at the top are constructed before it gets down to the stringMap initialisation). The usual solution is to use a nested class. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 3 '09 at 21:36
  • Thank you everyone for such rapid response. (FWIW I didn't find the Sun Javadocs very useful for this problem). – peter.murray.rust Jul 3 '09 at 21:45
  • It's really a language issue than a library issue. However, I think the API docs are read more than the JLS (although perhaps not by language designers), so things like this should probably have more prominence in the java.lang docs. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 3 '09 at 22:37

11 Answers 11

206

Use the valueOf method which is automatically created for each Enum.

Verbosity.valueOf("BRIEF") == Verbosity.BRIEF

For arbitrary values start with:

public static Verbosity findByAbbr(String abbr){
    for(Verbosity v : values()){
        if( v.abbr().equals(abbr)){
            return v;
        }
    }
    return null;
}

Only move on later to Map implementation if your profiler tells you to.

I know it's iterating over all the values, but with only 3 enum values it's hardly worth any other effort, in fact unless you have a lot of values I wouldn't bother with a Map it'll be fast enough.

  • thanks - and I can use case conversion if I know the values are still distinct – peter.murray.rust Jul 5 '09 at 10:21
  • You can directy access the class member 'abbr' so instead of "v.abbr()" you can use "v.abbr.equals...". – Amio.io Apr 19 '15 at 12:08
  • 4
    Also, for arbitrary values (the second case) consider throwing an IllegalArgumentException instead of returning null (i.e. when no match is found) - this is how the JDK Enum.valueOf(..) does it, anyway. – Priidu Neemre May 21 '15 at 17:28
120

You're close. For arbitrary values, try something like the following:

public enum Day { 

    MONDAY("M"), TUESDAY("T"), WEDNESDAY("W"),
    THURSDAY("R"), FRIDAY("F"), SATURDAY("Sa"), SUNDAY("Su"), ;

    private final String abbreviation;

    // Reverse-lookup map for getting a day from an abbreviation
    private static final Map<String, Day> lookup = new HashMap<String, Day>();

    static {
        for (Day d : Day.values()) {
            lookup.put(d.getAbbreviation(), d);
        }
    }

    private Day(String abbreviation) {
        this.abbreviation = abbreviation;
    }

    public String getAbbreviation() {
        return abbreviation;
    }

    public static Day get(String abbreviation) {
        return lookup.get(abbreviation);
    }
}
  • 3
    instead of "EnumSet.allOf(Day.class)" you can use "Day.values()"... – Carlos Heuberger Jul 3 '09 at 21:37
  • Ah, so I can. Thanks. – Lyle Jul 3 '09 at 21:39
  • 3
    Due to classloader issues this method will not work reliable. I do not recommend it and I have seen it fail regularly because the lookup map is not ready before being accessed. You need to put the "lookup" outside of the enum or in another class so that it will load first. – Adam Gent Jul 18 '12 at 16:00
  • 5
    @Adam Gent: There's a link down below to the JLS where this exact construct is posed as an example. It says that static initialization occurs from top to bottom: docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-8.html#d5e12267 – Selena Oct 15 '14 at 18:22
  • 3
    Yes modern java like java 8 has fixed the memory model. That being said hot swap agents like jrebel still get messed up if you embed the initialization because of circular references. – Adam Gent Oct 16 '14 at 15:49
15

with Java 8 you can achieve with this way:

public static Verbosity findByAbbr(final String abbr){
    return Arrays.stream(values()).filter(value -> value.abbr().equals(abbr)).findFirst().orElse(null);
}
  • I would throw an exception rather than returning null. But it is also depending on the use case – alexander Apr 10 at 14:19
13

@Lyle's answer is rather dangerous and I have seen it not work particularly if you make the enum a static inner class. Instead I have used something like this which will load the BootstrapSingleton maps before the enums.

Edit this should not be a problem any more with modern JVMs (JVM 1.6 or greater) but I do think there are still issues with JRebel but I haven't had a chance to retest it.

Load me first:

   public final class BootstrapSingleton {

        // Reverse-lookup map for getting a day from an abbreviation
        public static final Map<String, Day> lookup = new HashMap<String, Day>();
   }

Now load it in the enum constructor:

   public enum Day { 
        MONDAY("M"), TUESDAY("T"), WEDNESDAY("W"),
        THURSDAY("R"), FRIDAY("F"), SATURDAY("Sa"), SUNDAY("Su"), ;

        private final String abbreviation;

        private Day(String abbreviation) {
            this.abbreviation = abbreviation;
            BootstrapSingleton.lookup.put(abbreviation, this);
        }

        public String getAbbreviation() {
            return abbreviation;
        }

        public static Day get(String abbreviation) {
            return lookup.get(abbreviation);
        }
    }

If you have an inner enum you can just define the Map above the enum definition and that (in theory) should get loaded before.

  • 2
    Need to define "dangerous" and why an inner class implementation matters. It is more of a top-to-bottom static definition issue but there is working code in another related answer with link back to this question that uses a static Map on the Enum instance itself with a "get" method from user-defined value to Enum type. stackoverflow.com/questions/604424/lookup-enum-by-string-value – Darrell Teague Jun 15 '16 at 19:30
  • 1
    @DarrellTeague the original issue was due to old JVMs (pre 1.6) or other JVMs (IBMs) or hotcode swappers (JRebel). The issue should not happen in modern JVMs so I may just delete my answer. – Adam Gent Jun 15 '16 at 20:24
  • Good to note that indeed it is possible due to custom compiler implementations and runtime optimizations... the ordering could be resequenced, resulting in an error. However, this would appear to violate the spec. – Darrell Teague Jun 17 '16 at 16:33
6

And you can't use valueOf()?

Edit: Btw, there is nothing stopping you from using static { } in an enum.

  • Or the synthetic valueOf on the enum class, so you don't need to specify the enum class Class. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 3 '09 at 21:34
  • Of course, it just didn't have a javadoc entry so it was hard to link to. – Fredrik Jul 3 '09 at 22:03
  • 1
    You can use valueOf() but the name must match identically to that set in the enum declaration. Either of the two lookup methods above can be modified to use .equalsIgnoringCase() and have little more robustness to error. – user1239282 Jun 22 '12 at 2:15
  • @leonardo True. If it adds robustness or just fault-tolerance is debatable. In most cases I would say it is the latter and in that case it is better to handle it elsewhere and still use Enum's valueOf(). – Fredrik Jun 24 '12 at 8:39
5

In the Java Language Specification 7 there is an a example! that reflects your question on initialization of the map with self-references.

  • 1
    Excellent to point out the reference, which is also what is used in Joshua Bloch's Effective Java ... – Darrell Teague Jun 15 '16 at 19:34
3

In case it helps others, the option I prefer, which is not listed here, uses Guava's Maps functionality:

public enum Vebosity {
    BRIEF("BRIEF"),
    NORMAL("NORMAL"),
    FULL("FULL");

    private String value;
    private Verbosity(final String value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public String getValue() {
        return this.value;
    }

    private static ImmutableMap<String, Verbosity> reverseLookup = 
            Maps.uniqueIndex(Arrays.asList(Verbosity.values()), Verbosity::getValue);

    public static Verbosity fromString(final String id) {
        return reverseLookup.getOrDefault(id, NORMAL);
    }
}

With the default you can use null, you can throw IllegalArgumentException or your fromString could return an Optional, whatever behavior you prefer.

1

Perhaps, take a look at this. Its working for me. The purpose of this is to lookup 'RED' with '/red_color'. Declaring a static map and loading the enums into it only once would bring some performance benefits if the enums are many.

public class Mapper {

public enum Maps {

    COLOR_RED("/red_color", "RED");

    private final String code;
    private final String description;
    private static Map<String, String> mMap;

    private Maps(String code, String description) {
        this.code = code;
        this.description = description;
    }

    public String getCode() {
        return name();
    }

    public String getDescription() {
        return description;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name();
    }

    public static String getColorName(String uri) {
        if (mMap == null) {
            initializeMapping();
        }
        if (mMap.containsKey(uri)) {
            return mMap.get(uri);
        }
        return null;
    }

    private static void initializeMapping() {
        mMap = new HashMap<String, String>();
        for (Maps s : Maps.values()) {
            mMap.put(s.code, s.description);
        }
    }
}
}

Please put in your opinons.

0

You can define your Enum as following code :

public enum Verbosity 
{
   BRIEF, NORMAL, FULL, ACTION_NOT_VALID;
   private int value;

   public int getValue()
   {
     return this.value;
   } 

   public static final Verbosity getVerbosityByValue(int value)
   {
     for(Verbosity verbosity : Verbosity.values())
     {
        if(verbosity.getValue() == value)
            return verbosity ;
     }

     return ACTION_NOT_VALID;
   }

   @Override
   public String toString()
   {
      return ((Integer)this.getValue()).toString();
   }
};

See following link for more clarification

0

since java 8 you can initialize the map in a single line and without static block

private static Map<String, Verbosity> stringMap = Arrays.stream(values())
                 .collect(Collectors.toMap(Enum::toString, Function.identity()));
-2

You can use the Enum::valueOf() function as suggested by Gareth Davis & Brad Mace above, but make sure you handle the IllegalArgumentException that would be thrown if the string used is not present in the enum.

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