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For an XML document that looks like this,

<Products>
    <productTypes>
        <productType name="BigOranges">
            <product>
                <name>BigOrange1</name>
                <quatity>25</quatity>
            </product>
            <product>
                <name>BigOrange2</name>
                <quatity>55</quatity>
            </product>
        </productType>
        <productType name="BigApples">
            <product>
                <name>BigApples1</name>
                <quatity>25</quatity>
            </product>
            <product>
                <name>BigApples2</name>
                <quatity>55</quatity>
            </product>
        </productType>
    </productTypes>
</Products>

I tried to auto-generate the XSD file to see an example and this is what was generated.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
    <xs:simpleType name="T_quatity">
        <xs:restriction base="xs:byte">
            <xs:enumeration value="25"/>
            <xs:enumeration value="55"/>
        </xs:restriction>
    </xs:simpleType>
    <xs:simpleType name="T_name">
        <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
            <xs:enumeration value="BigApples1"/>
            <xs:enumeration value="BigApples2"/>
            <xs:enumeration value="BigOrange1"/>
            <xs:enumeration value="BigOrange2"/>
        </xs:restriction>
    </xs:simpleType>
    <xs:simpleType name="AT_1">
        <xs:restriction base="xs:string">
            <xs:enumeration value="BigApples"/>
            <xs:enumeration value="BigOranges"/>
        </xs:restriction>
    </xs:simpleType>
    <xs:complexType name="T_productTypes">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element ref="productType" maxOccurs="unbounded"/>
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>
    <xs:complexType name="T_productType">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element ref="product" maxOccurs="unbounded"/>
        </xs:sequence>
        <xs:attribute ref="name" use="required"/>
    </xs:complexType>
    <xs:complexType name="T_product">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element ref="name"/>
            <xs:element ref="quatity"/>
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>
    <xs:complexType name="T_Products">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:element ref="productTypes"/>
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>
    <xs:attribute name="name" type="AT_1"/>
    <xs:element name="quatity" type="T_quatity"/>
    <xs:element name="productTypes" type="T_productTypes"/>
    <xs:element name="productType" type="T_productType"/>
    <xs:element name="product" type="T_product"/>
    <xs:element name="name" type="T_name"/>
    <xs:element name="Products" type="T_Products"/>
</xs:schema>

Looking at the above, i can see that what is happening is that they types are defined and these are then used later when the elements are defined. What i don't understand though is that the elements are defined one after the other and do not follow the structure of the XML message.

If this schema will be used to validate the XML document, how will the structure of the XML file be validated? For example using the above schema, how does it know that the productTypes element is an inner tag for the productType tag?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

You got your illustration of the question a bit wrong... it should've been how does it know that the productTypes element is an inner tag for the productTypeProducts tag

I think that what's confusing you is the order in which the global elements are shown in the XSD file, and it has to do with the authoring style of the generated XSD, style typically referred to as "The Garden of Eden".

It should be noted that there is no relationship between the way these global definitions show up in the XSD, and a compliant XML instance.

As an example, if you're familiar with an UML class diagram, it is irrelevant the same way the position of the class within a visual UML class diagram is to the actual use of the class in the real world.

As a sidebar, I can see now, from your confusion, that learning XSD in The Garden of Eden ;) could prove a bad starting point if one is trying to follow the XML structure.

Below is another generated XSD that works for the same XML; I would think you may find this more intuitive (btw, this authoring style is referred to as "The Russian Doll" due to its deeply nested structures).

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!--XML Schema generated by QTAssistant/XML Schema Refactoring (XSR) Module (http://www.paschidev.com)-->
<xsd:schema attributeFormDefault="unqualified" elementFormDefault="qualified" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <xsd:element name="Products">
    <xsd:complexType>
      <xsd:sequence>
        <xsd:element name="productTypes">
          <xsd:complexType>
            <xsd:sequence>
              <xsd:element maxOccurs="unbounded" name="productType">
                <xsd:complexType>
                  <xsd:sequence>
                    <xsd:element maxOccurs="unbounded" name="product">
                      <xsd:complexType>
                        <xsd:sequence>
                          <xsd:element name="name" type="xsd:string" />
                          <xsd:element name="quatity" type="xsd:unsignedByte" />
                        </xsd:sequence>
                      </xsd:complexType>
                    </xsd:element>
                  </xsd:sequence>
                  <xsd:attribute name="name" type="xsd:string" use="required" />
                </xsd:complexType>
              </xsd:element>
            </xsd:sequence>
          </xsd:complexType>
        </xsd:element>
      </xsd:sequence>
    </xsd:complexType>
  </xsd:element>
</xsd:schema>

I think that the above also emphasizes and clarifies @Romil 's answer in your case (he was referring to T_Products).

As to how validation works, it is not that easy to explain. You could think of it as a state machine where transitions between states are controlled by the constraints you put in the XSD (min/max occurs, sequence vs. choice vs. all). The XML reader goes through the XML, and tries to move from state to state; when it reaches a point from where there's no way out, it may be an error, or successful validation, depends...

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Yes the above format makes more sense to me than the "Garden of Eden" approach. Which of the two is the most commonly used approach and does one have any disadvantage over the other? – ziggy May 31 '12 at 10:43
    
It would be too much to explain in a post... Try this link. In real life, the Russian Doll is rather confined to learning (at least I haven't seen it in any production environment). To add to the confusion, there are two more styles, Venetian Blind and Salami Slice; actually, The Garden of Eden is a combination of the Venetian and the Salami. If anything, I've mostly seen the Venetian and the Garden. For a comparative analysis, please refer to external links. – Petru Gardea May 31 '12 at 11:04
    
Ok thanks will try and investigate a bit more. – ziggy May 31 '12 at 11:07

xs:complexType is used to show which object will be nested in this parent object. xs:sequence is showing the order of child objects in the parent object.

xs:simpleType means that is atomic object.

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