21

I have a question that might seem fairly simple (of course if you know the answer).

A certain function I have calls another function but I want to continue execution from the caller even though the callee has thrown an exception. Let me give you an example:

something function1()
{
    try
    {
        //some code
        int idNumber = function2();
        //other code that need to execute even if function2 fails
        return something;
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {//... perhaps something here}
}

EDIT: function1 also has a return statement so nothing can in fact crash on the way

In function2 I need to do stuff but I only need to log if anything fails, example:

int function2()
{
    try
    {
        //dostuff
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        //Log stuff to db
    }
}

ok, now my question is, what should I do if I wanted to continue execution in function1 even if function 2 throws an error?

Sometimes I mix up if I should do throw; or throw e; or throw nothing at all (leave catch block empty)

1
  • 3
    Nothing. As you have handled exceptions in function2, provided you don't rethrow inside function2's catch(...)
    – Indy9000
    May 30 '12 at 16:16
26

Leaving the catch block empty should do the trick. This is almost always a bad idea, though. On one hand, there's a performance penalty, and on the other (and this is more important), you always want to know when there's an error.

I would guess that the "callee" function failing, in your case, is actually not necessarily an "error," so to speak. That is, it is expected for it to fail sometimes. If this is the case, there is almost always a better way to handle it than using exceptions.

There are, if you'll pardon the pun, exceptions to the "rule", though. For example, if function2 were to call a web service whose results aren't really necessary for your page, this kind of pattern might be ok. Although, in almost 100% of cases, you should at least be logging it somewhere. In this scenario I'd log it in a finally block and report whether or not the service returned. Remember that data like that which may not be valuable to you now can become valuable later!

Last edit (probably):

In a comment I suggested you put the try/catch inside function2. Just thought I would elaborate. Function2 would look like this:

public Something? function2()
{
    try
    {
        //all of your function goes here
        return anActualObjectOfTypeSomething;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        //logging goes here
        return null;
    }
}

That way, since you use a nullable return type, returning null doesn't hurt you.

9
  • Yes, I was starting to lean toward something else, I wanted to stackoverflow first. But now that you mention it I guess I might have to rethink my code :) May 30 '12 at 16:25
  • possibly so! there are exceptions to the rule though-- read my last edit May 30 '12 at 16:33
  • That´s a good advice, I should log these things no matter what. Any collected information can of course be good with time :) The problem is that function1() also needs to return að statement, therefore I might take your advice and rethink my code. May 30 '12 at 16:44
  • Well, as far as rethinking your code, I would suggest migrating your try/catch to inside function 2. That way, it'll return something either way and continue execution. May 30 '12 at 16:48
  • Also, if this was the answer that helped out most, remember to mark it as such :) May 30 '12 at 16:48
10

Why cant you use the finally block?

Like

try {

} catch (Exception e) {

  // THIS WILL EXECUTE IF THERE IS AN EXCEPTION IS THROWN IN THE TRY BLOCK

} finally { 

 // THIS WILL EXECUTE IRRESPECTIVE OF WHETHER AN EXCEPTION IS THROWN WITHIN THE TRY CATCH OR NOT

}

EDIT after question amended:

You can do:

int? returnFromFunction2 = null;
    try {
        returnFromFunction2 = function2();
        return returnFromFunction2.value;
        } catch (Exception e) {

          // THIS WILL EXECUTE IF THERE IS AN EXCEPTION IS THROWN IN THE TRY BLOCK

        } finally { 

        if (returnFromFunction2.HasValue) { // do something with value }

         // THIS WILL EXECUTE IRRESPECTIVE OF WHETHER AN EXCEPTION IS THROWN WITHIN THE TRY CATCH OR NOT

        }
6
  • Well because function1() also needs to return other stuff. Let me edit my post to demonstrate :) May 30 '12 at 16:21
  • I see what you did there, that´s acutally clever. The problem I face is that function1() also has to return a statement, therefore I have to continue after catch from function2(), since finally blocks can´t include return statements :) May 30 '12 at 16:39
  • you can calculate the return statement in the finally block and return it after. Stuff after the finally block will also execute.
    – Yannis
    May 30 '12 at 16:40
  • That´s true. My other code in function1() along with the return statement could of course be run afture the finally block. But will the catch block in function1() not stop all executions (excluding the finally block)? The thing is, if I will not alter my code entirely, the return statment in function1() can not be interrupted even though function2() will throw an exception. May 30 '12 at 16:47
  • the finally statement will execute no matter what. Execution stops when an unhandled exception is thrown. You are handling exception in the try-catch block(s). Even when function2 throws an exception you are still handling that and then return from function1 as you would normally.
    – Yannis
    May 30 '12 at 16:49
6

Or you can encapsulate the looping logic itself in a try catch e.g.

for(int i = function2(); i < 100 /*where 100 is the end or another function call to get the end*/; i = function2()){

    try{
     //ToDo
    }
    catch { continue; }    

}

Or...

try{ 
    for(int i = function2(); ; ;) {
        try { i = function2(); return; } 
        finally { /*decide to break or not :P*/continue; } }
} catch { /*failed on first try*/ } finally{ /*afterwardz*/ }
9
  • How does this answer the question? May 30 '12 at 16:17
  • I´m trying to figure out what 100 stands for. Do you mean that 100 is the way out of the loop (or whatever I put instead for 100 to jump out)? May 30 '12 at 16:32
  • But why use a loop? There is no mention in the question that function2 needs to be repetitively invoked May 30 '12 at 16:34
  • I assumed it was returning a index relevant to a supposed later action... I just assumed... And 100 would be what you don't want to go past... this was just an alternate... no need for hostility! I up voted the current answer I just wanted to state for the record!
    – Jay
    May 30 '12 at 16:42
  • 1
    Thank you both for your inputs, remember we are all friends here ;) I actually see now what you mean with this for-loop, very clever. Actually what function2() is doing for me is trying to create stuff, if it throws an exception I will basically not care, I just want to log it. (therefore just keep on executin). I might need to rethink some of my code to continue :) May 30 '12 at 16:50
1

just do this

    try
    {
        //some code
     try
     {
          int idNumber = function2();

     }
     finally
     {
       do stuff here....
     }
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {//... perhaps something here}

For all intents and purposes the finally block will always execute. Now there are a couple of exceptions where it won't actually execute: task killing the program, and there is a fast fail security exception which kills the application instantly. Other than that, an exception will be thrown in function 2, the finally block will execute the needed code and then catch the exception in the outer catch block.

7
  • won't this just fail on function2() and skip //other code that needs to execute? May 30 '12 at 16:17
  • fanally block whould execute after executing try and catch blocks May 30 '12 at 16:19
  • hmm.... my thoughts exactly. But the finally block should cover the rest though. For all purposes I need to continue though function2() fails... May 30 '12 at 16:19
  • yeah, your edit fixed what i was talking about. I think it was just a typo May 30 '12 at 16:22
  • Also, only because its a pet peeve of mine, its "all intents and purposes" :) May 30 '12 at 16:23
0

Do you mean you want to execute code in function1 regardless of whether function2 threw an exception or not? Have you looked at the finally-block? http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zwc8s4fz.aspx

1
  • Yes, i´ve edited my post, I need to have function1() also return another statement so I can not wrap a return statement within a finally block (sorry for not stating that earlier) May 30 '12 at 16:24
0

In your second function remove the e variable in the catch block then add throw.

This will carry over the generated exception the the final function and output it.

Its very common when you dont want your business logic code to throw exception but your UI.

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