472

The Include() method works quite well for Lists on objects. But what if I need to go two levels deep? For example, the method below will return ApplicationServers with the included properties shown here. However, ApplicationsWithOverrideGroup is another container that holds other complex objects. Can I do an Include() on that property as well? Or how can I get that property to fully load?

As it stands now, this method:

public IEnumerable<ApplicationServer> GetAll()
{
    return this.Database.ApplicationServers
        .Include(x => x.ApplicationsWithOverrideGroup)                
        .Include(x => x.ApplicationWithGroupToForceInstallList)
        .Include(x => x.CustomVariableGroups)                
        .ToList();
}

Will populate only the Enabled property (below) and not the Application or CustomVariableGroup properties (below). How do I make this happen?

public class ApplicationWithOverrideVariableGroup : EntityBase
{
    public bool Enabled { get; set; }
    public Application Application { get; set; }
    public CustomVariableGroup CustomVariableGroup { get; set; }
}
2
  • Hi, Why I get a exception Expression must be a member expression when I try this: To include a collection and then a collection one level down: query.Include(e => e.Level1Collection.Select(l1 => l1.Level2Collection)).
    – Joe.wang
    Jan 2, 2013 at 9:31
  • 1
    @BobHorn, I have the same issue.. In my case, the nesting goes deep down multiple layers, i managed to do a include you pointed out. In the SQL which got generated, i could see all columns are returning with different alias name as c1,c2 something like that. My question is , how i can form a nested DTO collection out of all my includes:(.. May be you can take the above example itself, in that we are returning all the columns without any custom DTO (which itself is collection of DTO's)
    – TechQuery
    Nov 20, 2015 at 21:32

10 Answers 10

896

For EF 6

using System.Data.Entity;

query.Include(x => x.Collection.Select(y => y.Property))

Make sure to add using System.Data.Entity; to get the version of Include that takes in a lambda.


For EF Core

Use the new method ThenInclude

using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;

query.Include(x => x.Collection)
     .ThenInclude(x => x.Property);
14
  • 1
    I can't do Include() on ApplicationsWithOverrideGroup. It doesn't show up in intellisense.
    – Bob Horn
    May 30, 2012 at 19:42
  • 1
    Ahhhh, but that link you provided seems to provide the answer. Let me try this: To include a collection and then a collection one level down: query.Include(e => e.Level1Collection.Select(l1 => l1.Level2Collection)).
    – Bob Horn
    May 30, 2012 at 19:46
  • 71
    Remember to include System.Data.Entity in the usings. Otherwise Intellisense will only give you the Include(string path) version of the method. Jul 28, 2013 at 3:15
  • 7
    @Adeem you need to call Include for each property: Db.States.Include(state => state.Cities.Select(city => city.Customers).Include(state => state.Cities.Select(city => city.Vendors)
    – Diego
    Feb 24, 2016 at 15:13
  • 1
    You can do Db.States.Include(s => s.Cities).ThenInclude(c => c.Customers). The trick is that Intellisense won't give you a drop-down on the second include properties, but just forge ahead and type it anyway. It will build and work! It's a bug in intellisense only. NOTE - for EF Core only. Jul 11, 2018 at 4:37
86

If I understand you correctly you are asking about including nested properties. If so :

.Include(x => x.ApplicationsWithOverrideGroup.NestedProp)

or

.Include("ApplicationsWithOverrideGroup.NestedProp")  

or

.Include($"{nameof(ApplicationsWithOverrideGroup)}.{nameof(NestedProp)}")  
5
  • 7
    Thanks, I can try that. I was hoping to be able to keep things strongly typed and avoid string literals. But if that's how it has to be done...
    – Bob Horn
    May 30, 2012 at 19:42
  • 1
    You were close. I may not have been clear that ApplicationsWithOverrideGroup was a list. Thanks for helping!
    – Bob Horn
    May 30, 2012 at 19:51
  • @Judo, I have the same issue.. In my case, the nesting goes deep down multiple layers, i managed to do a include you pointed out. In the SQL which got generated, i could see all columns are returning with different alias name as c1,c2 something like that. My question is , how i can form a nested DTO collection out of all my includes:(.. May be you can take the above example itself, in that we are returning all the columns without any custom DTO (which itself is collection of DTO's)
    – TechQuery
    Nov 20, 2015 at 21:32
  • 3
    Remember to include System.Data.Entity in the usings. Otherwise Intellisense will only give you the Include(string path) version of the method.
    – AlexMelw
    May 29, 2018 at 10:32
  • 1
    Hello, if for EF core this does indeed work .Include(x => x.ApplicationsWithOverrideGroup.NestedProp) If so what is the point in using Include / ThenInclude as they both work and produce the same SQL. Am i missing something? Dec 20, 2020 at 15:30
75

EF Core: Using "ThenInclude" to load mutiple levels: For example:

var blogs = context.Blogs
    .Include(blog => blog.Posts)
        .ThenInclude(post => post.Author)
        .ThenInclude(author => author.Photo)
    .ToList();
4
  • 58
    Looks like this is EF Core only Jul 25, 2016 at 20:59
  • 27
    FYI: VS2017 the intellisense wasn't working for .ThenInclude. Just type it in how you think it should be and the error highlighting should go away. Apr 22, 2017 at 20:29
  • 4
    I want to emphasize @JohnWrensby 's comment, the Intellisense can sometimes take especially long to handle these ThenInclude , this can be quite confusing for new users. I also had cases where the simple Include lambda expression was not handled properly, until you just type it and compile it, ignoring the "errors" shown in VS.
    – Pac0
    Jun 28, 2017 at 8:46
  • @Pac0 you saved my day. struggling to see the child items and could not.
    – Bendram
    Dec 9, 2019 at 19:47
50

The EFCore examples on MSDN show that you can do some quite complex things with Include and ThenInclude.

This is a good example of how complex you can get (this is all one chained statement!):

viewModel.Instructors = await _context.Instructors

      .Include(i => i.OfficeAssignment)

      .Include(i => i.CourseAssignments)
        .ThenInclude(i => i.Course)
            .ThenInclude(i => i.Enrollments)
                .ThenInclude(i => i.Student)

      .Include(i => i.CourseAssignments)
        .ThenInclude(i => i.Course)
            .ThenInclude(i => i.Department)

      .AsNoTracking()
      .OrderBy(i => i.LastName)
      .ToListAsync();

You can have multiple Include calls - even after ThenInclude and it kind of 'resets' you back to the level of the top level entity (Instructors).

You can even repeat the same 'first level' collection (CourseAssignments) multiple times followed by separate ThenIncludes commands to get to different child entities.

Note your actual query must be tagged onto the end of the Include or ThenIncludes chain. The following does NOT work:

var query = _context.Instructors.AsQueryable();
query.Include(i => i.OfficeAssignment);

var first10Instructors = query.Take(10).ToArray();

Would strongly recommend you set up logging and make sure your queries aren't out of control if you're including more than one or two things. It's important to see how it actually works - and you'll notice each separate 'include' is typically a new query to avoid massive joins returning redundant data.

AsNoTracking can greatly speed things up if you're not intending on actually editing the entities and resaving.


EFCore 5 made some changes to the way queries for multiple sets of entities are sent to the server. There are new options for Split Queries which can make certain queries of this type far more efficient with fewer joins, but make sure to understand the limitations - and enable logging to avoid performance surprises later.

3
  • 1
    Is there a way to get both the Enrollment and the Departments without your repeated .Includes for CourseAssignment and Course? (So far, it seems like the Api can go deeper with .ThenInclude, or back to the top level with .Include, but there is nothing to stay at the same level?) Feb 8, 2018 at 23:02
  • If you want lazy-loading stay tuned for EF Core 2.1 blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/dotnet/2018/02/02/… but if you just want to load more at the same level I think this is by design. I'm not sure what you're thinking - it doesn't require much extra to do this and it greatly reduces what comes back from the database. An entity may just have one or two 'same-level' things but it may also have 50 for a large project, being explicit makes your app much faster. Feb 8, 2018 at 23:06
  • This was a good explanation of the concept of the Include "resetting" the level back to the initial level again. Helped me wrap my head around the heirarchy of the includ system. Cheers! Nov 6, 2019 at 14:50
34

I made a little helper for Entity Framework 6 (.Net Core style), to include sub-entities in a nice way.

It is on NuGet now : Install-Package ThenInclude.EF6

using System.Data.Entity;

var thenInclude = context.One.Include(x => x.Twoes)
    .ThenInclude(x=> x.Threes)
    .ThenInclude(x=> x.Fours)
    .ThenInclude(x=> x.Fives)
    .ThenInclude(x => x.Sixes)
    .Include(x=> x.Other)
    .ToList();

The package is available on GitHub.

4
  • hi, i have an exception at runtime, cannot cast IncludableQueryable<observablecollection> to IncludableQueryable<genericcollection> Mar 29, 2018 at 18:00
  • i am using db first and i have modified the tt file to get ObservableCollections for all my entities, any help is welcome . Mar 29, 2018 at 18:01
  • 2
    @lenny32 anything to be aware of with this extension? Jun 12, 2018 at 4:10
  • Note that this is not required if the property you're navigating to is one-to-one with the DbSet you navigated from, and you can chain DbSet<One>().Include(x => x.Two.Three.Four.Five.Six) with the only drawback being you're computing a cartesian product and potentially increasing bandwidth. May 20, 2020 at 0:02
27

I also had to use multiple includes and at 3rd level I needed multiple properties

(from e in context.JobCategorySet
                      where e.Id == id &&
                            e.AgencyId == agencyId
                      select e)
                      .Include(x => x.JobCategorySkillDetails)
                      .Include(x => x.Shifts.Select(r => r.Rate).Select(rt => rt.DurationType))
                      .Include(x => x.Shifts.Select(r => r.Rate).Select(rt => rt.RuleType))
                      .Include(x => x.Shifts.Select(r => r.Rate).Select(rt => rt.RateType))
                      .FirstOrDefaultAsync();

This may help someone :)

2
  • 1
    can this be done without repeating .Include(x => x.Shifts.Select(r => r.Rate).Select(rt => rt......
    – Multinerd
    Jan 10, 2018 at 20:58
  • well it depends, how deep you wanna go
    – dnxit
    Jan 11, 2018 at 7:34
8

Let me state it clearly that you can use the string overload to include nested levels regardless of the multiplicities of the corresponding relationships, if you don't mind using string literals:

query.Include("Collection.Property")
2
  • 1
    This method was helpful for me to figure out how this can be coded in VB , as i cant find anywhere after hours of googling.
    – shab
    May 5, 2019 at 20:59
  • This works great for me, I use this a lot!!! It even works combined with .SelectMany statements : query.SelectMany(x=>x.foos).Include("bar").Include("bar.docs")...
    – Ephie
    May 27, 2020 at 13:32
0

I'm going to add my solution to my particular problem. I had two collections at the same level I needed to include. The final solution looked like this.

var recipe = _bartendoContext.Recipes
    .Include(r => r.Ingredients)
    .ThenInclude(r => r.Ingredient)
    .Include(r => r.Ingredients)
    .ThenInclude(r => r.MeasurementQuantity)
    .FirstOrDefault(r => r.Id == recipeId);
if (recipe?.Ingredients == null) return 0m;
var abv = recipe.Ingredients.Sum(ingredient => ingredient.Ingredient.AlcoholByVolume * ingredient.MeasurementQuantity.Quantity);
return abv;

This is calculating the percent alcohol by volume of a given drink recipe. As you can see I just included the ingredients collection twice then included the ingredient and quantity onto that.

0

I figured out a simplest way. You don't need to install package ThenInclude.EF or you don't need to use ThenInclude for all nested navigation properties. Just do like as shown below, EF will take care rest for you. example:

var thenInclude = context.One.Include(x => x.Twoes.Threes.Fours.Fives.Sixes)
.Include(x=> x.Other)
.ToList();
1
  • 2
    No. You can't do that with collections. It only works if all properties are references. Your naming suggests the opposite. Feb 25, 2021 at 20:45
0

I have an Index page that displays MbsNavigation.Name that is a Firmware object loaded as foreign key. The Firmware object is big, so it takes few minutes to load Index page via an Internet.

BatterySystem = await _context.BatterySystems.Include(b => b.MbsNavigation)

This is a solution to load Firmware.Name only:

BatterySystem = await _context.BatterySystems
.Include(b => b.MbsNavigation)
.Select(b => new BatterySystem() 
{
    Name = b.Name,
    MbsNavigation = new Firmware() { Name = b.MbsNavigation.Name },
})
.ToListAsync();

Now the Index loads immediately.

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