77

My MySQL database needs two users: appuser and support.
One of the application developers insists that I create four accounts for these users:

appuser@'%'
appuser@'localhost'
support@'%'
support@'localhost'

For the life of me I can't figure out why he thinks we need this. Wouldn't using the wildcard as the host take care of the 'localhost'?

Any ideas?

(Using MySQL 5.5 here)

92

localhost is special in MySQL, it means a connection over a UNIX socket (or named pipes on Windows, I believe) as opposed to a TCP/IP socket. Using % as the host does not include localhost, hence the need to explicitly specify it.

  • In what version? In MySQL 5.5.35, "%" matches localhost too. – depquid Feb 3 '14 at 21:54
  • 4
    Not only does "localhost" connect via the local socket, 127.0.0.1 (which doesn't use the socket) won't match % but localhost instead, too. Saw that with a haproxy installation today. – Phillipp Jul 31 '14 at 18:15
31

As @nos pointed out in the comments of the currently accepted answer to this question, the accepted answer is incorrect.

Yes, there IS a difference between using % and localhost for the user account host when connecting via a socket connect instead of a standard TCP/IP connect.

A host value of % does not include localhost for sockets and thus must be specified if you want to connect using that method.

8

Let's just test.

Connect as superuser, and then:

SHOW VARIABLES LIKE "%version%"; 
+-------------------------+------------------------------+ 
| Variable_name           | Value                        | 
+-------------------------+------------------------------+ 
| version                 | 10.0.23-MariaDB-0+deb8u1-log | 

and then

USE mysql;

Setup

Create a user foo with password bar for testing:

CREATE USER foo@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'bar'; FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Connect

To connect to the Unix Domain Socket (i.e. the I/O pipe that is named by the filesystem entry /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock or some such), run this on the command line (use the --protocol option to make doubly sure)

mysql -pbar -ufoo
mysql -pbar -ufoo --protocol=SOCKET

One expects that the above matches "user comes from localhost" but certainly not "user comes from 127.0.0.1".

To connect to the server from "127.0.0.1" instead, run this on the command line

mysql -pbar -ufoo --bind-address=127.0.0.1 --protocol=TCP

If you leave out --protocol=TCP, the mysql command will still try to use the Unix domain socket. You can also say:

mysql -pbar -ufoo --bind-address=127.0.0.1 --host=127.0.0.1

The two connection attempts in one line:

export MYSQL_PWD=bar; \
mysql -ufoo --protocol=SOCKET --execute="SELECT 1"; \
mysql -ufoo --bind-address=127.0.0.1 --host=127.0.0.1 --execute="SELECT 1"

(the password is set in the environment so that it is passed to the mysql process)

Verification In Case Of Doubt

To really check whether the connection goes via a TCP/IP socket or a Unix Domain socket

  1. get the PID of the mysql client process by examining the output of ps faux
  2. run lsof -n -p<yourpid>.

You will see something like:

mysql [PID] quux 3u IPv4 [code] 0t0 TCP 127.0.0.1:[port]->127.0.0.1:mysql (ESTABLISHED)

or

mysql [PID] quux 3u unix [code] 0t0 [code] socket

So:

Case 0: Host = '10.10.10.10' (null test)

update user set host='10.10.10.10' where user='foo'; flush privileges;
  • Connect using socket: FAILURE
  • Connect from 127.0.0.1: FAILURE

Case 1: Host = '%'

update user set host='%' where user='foo'; flush privileges;
  • Connect using socket: OK
  • Connect from 127.0.0.1: OK

Case 2: Host = 'localhost'

update user set host='localhost' where user='foo';flush privileges;

Behaviour varies and this apparently depends on skip-name-resolve. If set, causes lines with localhost to be ignored according to the log. The following can be seen in the error log: "'user' entry 'root@localhost' ignored in --skip-name-resolve mode.". This means no connecting through the Unix Domain Socket. But this is empirically not the case. localhost now means ONLY the Unix Domain Socket, and no longer matched 127.0.0.1.

skip-name-resolve is off:

  • Connect using socket: OK
  • Connect from 127.0.0.1: OK

skip-name-resolve is on:

  • Connect using socket: OK
  • Connect from 127.0.0.1: FAILURE

Case 3: Host = '127.0.0.1'

update user set host='127.0.0.1' where user='foo';flush privileges;
  • Connect using socket: FAILURE
  • Connect from 127.0.0.1: OK

Case 4: Host = ''

update user set host='' where user='foo';flush privileges;
  • Connect using socket: OK
  • Connect from 127.0.0.1: OK

(According to MySQL 5.7: 6.2.4 Access Control, Stage 1: Connection Verification, The empty string '' also means “any host” but sorts after '%'. )

Case 5: Host = '192.168.0.1' (extra test)

('192.168.0.1' is one of my machine's IP addresses, change appropriately in your case)

update user set host='192.168.0.1' where user='foo';flush privileges;
  • Connect using socket: FAILURE
  • Connect from 127.0.0.1: FAILURE

but

  • Connect using mysql -pbar -ufoo -h192.168.0.1: OK (!)

The latter because this is actually TCP connection coming from 192.168.0.1, as revealed by lsof:

TCP 192.168.0.1:37059->192.168.0.1:mysql (ESTABLISHED)

Edge Case A: Host = '0.0.0.0'

update user set host='0.0.0.0' where user='foo';flush privileges;
  • Connect using socket: FAILURE
  • Connect from 127.0.0.1: FAILURE

Edge Case B: Host = '255.255.255.255'

update user set host='255.255.255.255' where user='foo';flush privileges;
  • Connect using socket: FAILURE
  • Connect from 127.0.0.1: FAILURE

Edge Case C: Host = '127.0.0.2'

(127.0.0.2 is perfectly valid loopback address equivalent to 127.0.0.1 as defined in RFC6890)

update user set host='127.0.0.2' where user='foo';flush privileges;
  • Connect using socket: FAILURE
  • Connect from 127.0.0.1: FAILURE

Interestingly:

  • mysql -pbar -ufoo -h127.0.0.2 connects from 127.0.0.1 and is FAILURE
  • mysql -pbar -ufoo -h127.0.0.2 --bind-address=127.0.0.2 is OK

Cleanup

delete from user where user='foo';flush privileges;

Addendum

To see what is actually in the mysql.user table, which is one of the permission tables, use:

SELECT SUBSTR(password,1,6) as password, user, host,
Super_priv AS su,
Grant_priv as gr,
CONCAT(Select_priv, Lock_tables_priv) AS selock,
CONCAT(Insert_priv, Update_priv, Delete_priv, Create_priv, Drop_priv) AS modif,
CONCAT(References_priv, Index_priv, Alter_priv) AS ria,
CONCAT(Create_tmp_table_priv, Create_view_priv, Show_view_priv) AS views,
CONCAT(Create_routine_priv, Alter_routine_priv, Execute_priv, Event_priv, Trigger_priv) AS funcs,
CONCAT(Repl_slave_priv, Repl_client_priv) AS replic,
CONCAT(Shutdown_priv, Process_priv, File_priv, Show_db_priv, Reload_priv, Create_user_priv) AS admin
FROM user ORDER BY user, host;

this gives:

+----------+----------+-----------+----+----+--------+-------+-----+-------+-------+--------+--------+
    | password | user     | host      | su | gr | selock | modif | ria | views | funcs | replic | admin  |
    +----------+----------+-----------+----+----+--------+-------+-----+-------+-------+--------+--------+
    | *E8D46   | foo      |           | N  | N  | NN     | NNNNN | NNN | NNN   | NNNNN | NN     | NNNNNN |

Similarly for table mysql.db:

SELECT host,db,user, 
       Grant_priv as gr,
       CONCAT(Select_priv, Lock_tables_priv) AS selock, 
       CONCAT(Insert_priv, Update_priv, Delete_priv, Create_priv, Drop_priv) AS modif, 
       CONCAT(References_priv, Index_priv, Alter_priv) AS ria, 
       CONCAT(Create_tmp_table_priv, Create_view_priv, Show_view_priv) AS views, 
       CONCAT(Create_routine_priv, Alter_routine_priv, Execute_priv) AS funcs 
       FROM db ORDER BY user, db, host;
  • This needs a conclusion that makes it clear what the rest of the answer is actually saying without needing to understand the code. – Hashim May 14 at 22:32
6

If you want connect to user@'%' from localhost use mysql -h192.168.0.1 -uuser -p.

5

Going to provide a slightly different answer to those provided so far.

If you have a row for an anonymous user from localhost in your users table ''@'localhost' then this will be treated as more specific than your user with wildcard'd host 'user'@'%'. This is why it is necessary to also provide 'user'@'localhost'.

You can see this explained in more detail at the bottom of this page.

4

The percent symbol means: any host, including remote and local connections.

The localhost allows only local connections.

(so to start off, if you don't need remote connections to your database, you can get rid of the appuser@'%' user right away)

So, yes, they are overlapping, but...

...there is a reason for setting both types of accounts, this is explained in the mysql docs: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/adding-users.html.

If you have an have an anonymous user on your localhost, which you can spot with:

select Host from mysql.user where User='' and Host='localhost';

and if you just create the user appuser@'%' (and you not the appuser@'localhost'), then when the appuser mysql user connects from the local host, the anonymous user account is used (it has precedence over your appuser@'%' user).

And the fix for this is (as one can guess) to create the appuser@'localhost' (which is more specific that the local host anonymous user and will be used if your appuser connects from the localhost).

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