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Scenario:

  • a TActionManager, a TAction, and a TButton (associated with this action)
  • ActionManager constantly enables the Action in its OnUpdate event handler
  • the code in the action event handler launches an external program using a ShellExecAndWait method (using Jedi Code Library JCL)
  • requirement: the application should not allow to launch the application twice by clicking the button quickly another time

Problem:

  • ShellExecAndWait does not block the application message loop, so the user can click while the external application is still open
  • if he Action handler method disable the Action before the ShellExecAndWait call, the Update method will immediately re-enable it

So I could write like this

procedure TMyForm.OnMyAction(Sender: TObject);
begin
  try  
    // notify Action Manager that the Action is temporarily disabled
    SomeGlobalFlag := True;

    // disable the action 
    (Sender as TAction).Enabled := False;

    // do the call
    ShellExecAndWait( ... );

  finally

    // enable the action 
    (Sender as TAction).Enabled := True;

    // allow ActionManager to control the action again
    SomeGlobalFlag := False; 

  end;
end;

Is there an easier way? As the title of this question says - could I block input for the execution of the external application?

6

It depends on how friendly you want your program to be to its users.

The approach shown in the question will suffice, but it could leave the user wondering why the button appears disabled. Your program could be more helpful if it left the button enabled, but changed its behavior when clicked. Instead of starting another copy of the program, it could notify the user that the previous program is still running, and perhaps even offer to set focus to that program.

The question title asks how to disable all the controls on the form. (Whether the form is modal is irrelevant; modality deals with disabling the parent form(s), not the modal form itself.) Mjn's answer sort of does that by suspending an action list. That won't disable controls that aren't associated with actions, and it won't disable controls that are associated with a different action list. It could also disable controls on other forms that are associated with the same action list.

Marck's answer implicitly disables all the controls, but will probably confuse the user since none of the controls will look disabled. That seems similar to the idea Sertac apparently mentioned in a comment, to disable the entire form.

To disable all controls on a form, and have them appear disabled, you can use a recursive function like this:

procedure EnableControls(Parent: TWinControl; Enabled: Boolean);
var
  i: Integer;
  Ctl: TControl;
begin
  for i := 0 to Pred(Parent.ControlCount) do begin
    Ctl := Parent.Controls[i];
    Ctl.Enabled := Enabled;
    if Ctl is TWinControl then
      EnableControls(TWinControl(Ctl), Enabled);
  end;
end;

Use it like this:

procedure TMyForm.OnMyAction(Sender: TObject);
begin
  EnableControls(Self, False);
  try
    ShellExecAndWait(...);
  finally
    EnableControls(Self, True);
  end;
end;

Since we're directly modifying the Enabled properties of the controls, those properties will be severed from the Enabled properties of any associated actions. That solves the immediate need, but has the unwanted side effect that further modifications to an action's Enabled property will not affect the controls on this form.

Actions can be associated with multiple controls, and controls can reside on multiple forms. Since it's the action that's being updated, and not the controls directly, there isn't really a way to use actions to disable controls on just one form.


Now we come to the matter of whether disabling all the controls on a form is really the right solution to the problem that motivated this question. The question is a bit scattershot with regard to the goal and the proposed solution. The proposed solution is heavy-handed (disable everything on the form) for something that really only needs to prevent a single command from being invoked. And the command that shouldn't be invoked has nothing to do with the form; no matter how many controls are associated with the action on any number of forms, none should invoke the command. So, we should either disable the action, and implicitly disable whatever controls are associated with it, or we should modify the OnExecute event handler to detect re-entrance.

The solution shown in the question is the way to disable the action. Set a flag to indicate that the action is executing, and clear it when execution completes. Check that flag in the OnUpdate event handler. There's no need to manually disable the action in the OnExecute handler, though; actions already update themselves in their Execute methods. So we have this code:

var
  ActionIsExecuting: Boolean = False;

procedure TMyForm.OnMyAction(Sender: TObject);
begin
  // notify Action Manager that the Action is temporarily disabled
  ActionIsExecuting := True;
  try  
    // do the call
    ShellExecAndWait( ... );
  finally
    // allow ActionManager to control the action again
    ActionIsExecuting := False; 
  end;
end;

procedure TSomeModule.ActionUpdate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  (Sender as TAction).Enabled := not ActionIsExecuting and ...
end;

That requires multiple sections of code to cooperate regarding how to handle this action's execution. The action-updating code needs to know that the action needs to be able to temporarily disable itself.

For a more self-contained solution, we can leave the OnUpdate event alone and just keep the action enabled all the time. Instead, we'll keep track of re-entrance locally and notify the user:

procedure TMyForm.OnMyAction(Sender: TObject);
{$J+} // a.k.a. $WRITABLECONST ON
const
  ActionIsExecuting: Boolean = False;
{$J-}
begin
  if ActionIsExecuting then begin
    ShowMessage('The program is still running. Please wait.');
    exit;
  end;

  ActionIsExecuting := True;
  try
    ShellExecAndWait(...);
  finally
    ActionIsExecuting := False;
  end;
end;

Mjn's answer calls the five lines of code for setting the state and managing the try-finally block "too much boilerplate." You can reduce it to one line with an interfaced object and a helper function:

type
  TTemporaryFlag = class(TInterfacedObject)
  private
    FFlag: PBoolean;
  public
    constructor Create(Flag: PBoolean);
    destructor Destroy; override;
  end;

function TemporaryFlag(Flag: PBoolean): IUnknown;
begin
  Result := TTemporaryFlag.Create(FFlag);
end;

constructor TTemporaryFlag.Create;
begin
  inherited;
  FFlag := Flag;
  FFlag^ := True;
end;

destructor TTemporaryFlag.Destroy;
begin
  FFlag^ := False;
  inherited;
end;

Use it like this:

begin
  TemporaryFlag(@ActionIsExecuting);
  ShellExecAndWait(...);
end;

The function returns an interface reference, which the compiler stores in an implicitly declared temporary variable. At the end of the code, that variable is destroyed, and the stored interfaced object gets deallocated, returning the flag to its previous value.

  • I deleted my comment because disabling the form or the control associated with the action does not prevent the action to be executed by its shortcut. – Sertac Akyuz Jun 1 '12 at 15:11
  • 1
    You're right, @Sertac. The question asks about disabling components, but I've really only talked about disabling controls. Actions are components, and the primary portion of my answer (above the divider) ignores that. The distinction isn't necessary for the second part of my answer, though, since the question probably didn't mean to disable all components anyway. – Rob Kennedy Jun 1 '12 at 15:18
2

This solution depends on the actual Action or ActionManager component. Still too much "boilerplate" code. Also very fragile, as it assumes that the Sender is a TAction instance.

procedure TMyForm.OnMyAction(Sender: TObject);
begin
  try  
    // disable all actions 
    (Sender as TAction).ActionList.State := asSuspended; 


    // do the call
    ShellExecAndWait( ... );

  finally

    // enable all actions 
    (Sender as TAction).ActionList.State := asNormal; 

  end;
end;
  • 1
    Then try use what Sertac suggested in his (now deleted) comment, to use TForm.Enabled property. – TLama Jun 1 '12 at 11:24
  • 1
    @TLama - After I commented I did a quick test to find out that disabling controls/form does not help at all. – Sertac Akyuz Jun 1 '12 at 15:18
0

You could place all ui elements on a panel, and disable the panel. Your application will still respond to moves, resizes, repaints, etc.

0

The implementation of EnableControls suffers for something weird:

  • Not all components on a form are Enabled at same time

So disabling all (not saving the previous state) is a big miss.

To do it correcty, you need to create a Component list and store a pointer to the component and previous enabled state, so when restoring you can restore previous state.

Worst, that way is also not totally correct, since some code may change the Enabled status of some components, and when restoring that component Enabled status must not be restored... so no easy way to disable/re-enable can be done... not to mention if code depends on Enabled status of some components.

I do not remember now how i had done in the past... but there is a one sentence that block the form from mouse and keyboard (ignore them) and another to unblock it... that one is what i was trying to find when i came here from Google... may it is related to (TMouseActivate), but i remember it also block keyboard, so maybe this is not enought:

procedure TMyForm.FormMouseActivate(Sender: TObject; Button: TMouseButton; Shift: TShiftState; X, Y, HitTest: Integer; var MouseActivate: TMouseActivate);
begin
     if YourCondition
     then beign
               MouseActivate:=maNoActivateAndEat;
          end;
end;

I remember i did not use the following but it can also be used:

procedure BlockInput(ABlockInput:Boolean);stdcall;external 'USER32.DLL';
...
procedure TMyForm.MyEvent(Sender:TObject);
begin
     BlockInput(True);
     // Your code, long loop, etc
     BlockInput(False);
end;

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