140

I am using SH shell and I am trying to compare a string with a variable's value but the if condition is always execute to true. Why?

Here is some code:

Sourcesystem="ABC"

if [ "$Sourcesystem" -eq 'XYZ' ]; then 
    echo "Sourcesystem Matched" 
else
    echo "Sourcesystem is NOT Matched $Sourcesystem"  
fi;

echo Sourcesystem Value is  $Sourcesystem ;

Even this is not working:

Sourcesystem="ABC"

if [ 'XYZ' -eq "$Sourcesystem" ]; then 
    echo "Sourcesystem Matched" 
else
    echo "Sourcesystem is NOT Matched $Sourcesystem"  
fi;

echo Sourcesystem Value is  $Sourcesystem ;

Secondly, can we match this with a NULL or empty string?

marked as duplicate by codeforester, tripleee shell Nov 18 '18 at 12:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • First in Bourne shell you don't need the extra ';' When I test run the script in Bourne shell, the if condition is false. It will first give an warning: [: ABC: integer expression expected. The output is: "Sourcesystem is NOT Matched ABC". As commented by others, -eq is used for integer comparisons. Use a single equal sign for string comparison in Bourne shell (#!/bin/sh). Your shell should have corrected you in the first place. – Kemin Zhou Mar 21 '16 at 3:52
  • 2
    Voting to reopen. The cited dups are for bash shell, not the anemic sh shell which is sometimes a Posix shell or Dash. – jww Jan 18 at 10:55
216

You should use the = operator for string comparison:

Sourcesystem="ABC"

if [ "$Sourcesystem" = "XYZ" ]; then 
    echo "Sourcesystem Matched" 
else
    echo "Sourcesystem is NOT Matched $Sourcesystem"  
fi;

man test says that you use -z to match for empty strings.

  • 1
    It is not necessary to quote ABC or XYZ. – ceving Feb 12 '16 at 15:09
  • 16
    If your variable might have spaces in it then quoting is necessary. – William Everett Jan 11 '17 at 19:07
  • Adjusted the example to make that part clearer @WilliamEverett. – Per Lundberg Jul 28 '17 at 8:54
  • 1
    doesn't seem to work for arguments passed i.e. $1 – radtek Jan 24 '18 at 18:45
58

-eq is used to compare integers. Use = instead.

  • And pay attention to not use double equal "==" – Rodrigo Caballero Jul 18 '18 at 14:16
20

eq is used to compare integers use equal '=' instead , example:

if [ 'AAA' = 'ABC' ];
then 
    echo "the same" 
else 
    echo "not the same"
fi

good luck

15

I had this same problem, do this

if [ 'xyz' = 'abc' ];
then
echo "match"
fi

Notice the whitespace. It is important that you use a whitespace in this case after and before the = sign.

Check out "Other Comparison Operators".

  • 1
    in Dockerfile: /bin/sh: 1: [: =: unexpected operator – holms Apr 12 '17 at 23:35
8

-eq is the shell comparison operator for comparing integers. For comparing strings you need to use =.

7

-eq is a mathematical comparison operator. I've never used it for string comparison, relying on == and != for compares.

if [ 'XYZ' == 'ABC' ]; then   # Double equal to will work in Linux but not on HPUX boxes it should be if [ 'XYZ' = 'ABC' ] which will work on both
  echo "Match"
else
  echo "No Match"
fi
  • 12
    Note that the operator == does not work on every shell. = is the correct operator to use in order to compare strings, and == is sometimes a synonym. – Omer Dagan Mar 8 '15 at 12:26
3

Of the 4 shells that I've tested, ABC -eq XYZ evaluates to true in the test builtin for zsh and ksh. The expression evaluates to false under /usr/bin/test and the builtins for dash and bash. In ksh and zsh, the strings are converted to numerical values and are equal since they are both 0. IMO, the behavior of the builtins for ksh and zsh is incorrect, but the spec for test is ambiguous on this.

  • 1
    Thanks for testing. That's why Bourne shell is popular. – Kemin Zhou Mar 21 '16 at 3:57

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