62

Would just like too see what peoples Stored Procedure/Function etc comment headers look like (so post your examples)...I've only really seen what the SQL Server Management Studio creates but am interested in what other peoples look like...the formatting, characters used, procedure information/details etc I guess are what really makes them different...

SQL Server Management Studio (version 9) stored procedure comment header default:

-- =============================================
-- Author:      Name
-- Create date: 
-- Description: 
-- =============================================
  • 7
    Never use Line comments (--), use block comments (/* */) if you have a problem with line formatting you'll be on comments hell. – Gabriel Guimarães Mar 30 '11 at 12:44
  • 1
    Could you please elaborate on that @GabrielGuimarães? I have a lot of scripts with line comments and wasn't aware of this before: what should I look out for? – Robert Mark Bram Aug 23 '12 at 3:19
  • @GabrielGuimarães Management Studio has a function caleld "Comment out the selected lines" that prepends a line comment to all selected lines. The inverse function "Uncomment the selected lines" removes the leading line comment from all selected lines. Works well enough for me. What line-formatting problems do you have? – Iain Samuel McLean Elder Feb 26 '13 at 14:37
  • 3
    if on Old SQL Boxes you use the procedure sp_helptext to get the script of the procedure the lines are not breaked, and for that reason the result is a single line, there so you have no way to know where the comment should end. – Gabriel Guimarães Mar 8 '13 at 15:48
  • @GabrielGuimarães +1: Line comments save a lot of futzing with formatting - IMHO. – ScottWelker Aug 14 at 18:41

12 Answers 12

43
/******************************
** File:    
** Name:
** Desc:
** Auth:
** Date:
**************************
** Change History
**************************
** PR   Date        Author  Description 
** --   --------   -------   ------------------------------------
** 1    01/10/2008      Dan      added  inner join
*******************************/
  • 2
    when we add a new code to the stored procedure we add at the end of it a reference to the top. for example : select * from Boxes inner join Colors on Boxes.colorID=Colors.ID --PR#1 – Hagai L Jul 6 '09 at 9:50
  • 4
    That reminds me of the time we made the collective decision to remove all comments like "--PR#1" at the end of lines wherever we came across them. They never served any purpose. Forensic analysis of a change, in the rare instances when needed, was much easier using the change control software. – Jeffrey Kemp Jul 6 '09 at 13:46
  • 3
    Poor choice of date format. Is that Jan 10 or Oct 1? YYYY-MM-DD is easily sortable and unambiguous. – Nick Feb 8 '17 at 20:26
  • 1
    I would also add a line like this: -- TFS: Issue xxx: title placeholder in case that TFS is available. Also, change history could be tracked in the same issue, but is opinion based I guess. – mchar Aug 28 '18 at 12:18
  • 2
    Hi, It's the older Hagai L from the future... Nowadays it seems ridiculous to me. STP's is a bad, unmaintainable idea. And having to read the change history everytime I look into the STP makes it even worse. The example here was taken from the first company I was working in those days, and I hope most people don't do these things anymore... – Hagai L Aug 29 '18 at 18:38
19
--
-- STORED PROCEDURE
--     Name of stored procedure.
--
-- DESCRIPTION
--     Business description of the stored procedure's functionality.
--
-- PARAMETERS
--     @InputParameter1
--         * Description of @InputParameter1 and how it is used.
--
-- RETURN VALUE
--         0 - No Error.
--     -1000 - Description of cause of non-zero return value.
--
-- PROGRAMMING NOTES
--     Gotchas and other notes for your fellow programmer.
--
-- CHANGE HISTORY
--     05 May 2009 - Who
--        * More comprehensive description of the change than that included with the
--          source code commit message.
--
10

We use something like this and very useful for me .

/*  
Description:   
Author:   
Create Date: 
Param:   
Return:   
Modified Date:  
Modification:   
*/  
8
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- Author       name
-- Created      date
-- Purpose      description of the business/technical purpose
--              using multiple lines as needed
-- Copyright © yyyy, Company Name, All Rights Reserved
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- Modification History
--
-- 01/01/0000  developer full name  
--      A comprehensive description of the changes. The description may use as 
--      many lines as needed.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
5
-- [why did we write this?]
-- [auto-generated change control info]
  • 2
    Exactly. Documenting why is so much more worthwhile than what. Although as a beginner, I would prefer why, what as well as how. :) – Thor Hovden Sep 29 '11 at 7:56
5
set timing on <br>
set linesize 180<br>
spool template.log

/*<br>
##########################################################################<br>
-- Name : Template.sql<br>
-- Date             : (sysdate) <br>
-- Author           :   Duncan van der Zalm - dvdzalm<br>
-- Company          :   stanDaarD-Z.nl<br>
-- Purpose          :   <br>
-- Usage        sqlplus <br>
-- Impact   :<br>
-- Required grants  :   sel on A, upd on B, drop on C<br>
-- Called by        :   some other process<br
##########################################################################<br>
-- ver  user    date        change  <br>
-- 1.0  DDZ 20110622    initial<br>
##########################################################################<br>
*/<br>

sho user<br>

select name from v$database;

select to_char(sysdate, 'Day DD Month yyyy HH24:MI:SS') "Start time"
from dual
;


-- script


select to_char(sysdate, 'Day DD Month yyyy HH24:MI:SS') "End time"
from dual
;

spool off
5

I know this post is ancient, but well formatted code never goes out of style.

I use this template for all of my procedures. Some people don't like verbose code and comments, but as someone who frequently has to update stored procedures that haven't been touched since the mid 90s, I can tell you the value of writing well formatted and heavily commented code. Many were written to be as concise as possible, and it can sometimes take days to grasp the intent of a procedure. It's quite easy to see what a block of code is doing by simply reading it, but its far harder (and sometimes impossible) is understanding the intent of the code without proper commenting.

Explain it like you are walking a junior developer through it. Assume the person reading it knows little to nothing about functional area it's addressing and only has a limited understanding of SQL. Why? Many times people have to look at procedures to understand them even when they have no intention of or business modifying them.

/***************************************************************************************************
Procedure:          dbo.usp_DoSomeStuff
Create Date:        2018-01-25
Author:             Joe Expert
Description:        Verbose description of what the query does goes here. Be specific and don't be
                    afraid to say too much. More is better, than less, every single time. Think about
                    "what, when, where, how and why" when authoring a description.
Call by:            [schema.usp_ProcThatCallsThis]
                    [Application Name]
                    [Job]
                    [PLC/Interface]
Affected table(s):  [schema.TableModifiedByProc1]
                    [schema.TableModifiedByProc2]
Used By:            Functional Area this is use in, for example, Payroll, Accounting, Finance
Parameter(s):       @param1 - description and usage
                    @param2 - description and usage
Usage:              EXEC dbo.usp_DoSomeStuff
                        @param1 = 1,
                        @param2 = 3,
                        @param3 = 2
                    Additional notes or caveats about this object, like where is can and cannot be run, or
                    gotchas to watch for when using it.
****************************************************************************************************
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Date(yyyy-mm-dd)    Author              Comments
------------------- ------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------
2012-04-27          John Usdaworkhur    Move Z <-> X was done in a single step. Warehouse does not
                                        allow this. Converted to two step process.
                                        Z <-> 7 <-> X
                                            1) move class Z to class 7
                                            2) move class 7 to class X

2018-03-22          Maan Widaplan       General formatting and added header information.
2018-03-22          Maan Widaplan       Added logic to automatically Move G <-> H after 12 months.
***************************************************************************************************/

In addition to this header, your code should be well commented and outlined from top to bottom. Add comment blocks to major functional sections like:

/***********************************
**  Process all new Inventory records
**  Verify quantities and mark as
**  available to ship.
************************************/

Add lots of inline comments explaining all criteria except the most basic, and ALWAYS format your code for readability. Long vertical pages of indented code are better than wide short ones and make it far easier to see where code blocks begin and end years later when someone else is supporting your code. Sometimes wide, non-indented code is more readable. If so, use that, but only when necessary.

UPDATE Pallets
SET class_code = 'X'
WHERE
    AND class_code != 'D'
    AND class_code = 'Z' 
    AND historical = 'N'
    AND quantity > 0
    AND GETDATE() > DATEADD(minute, 30, creation_date)
    AND pallet_id IN ( -- Only update pallets that we've created an Adjustment record for
        SELECT Adjust_ID
        FROM Adjustments
        WHERE
            AdjustmentStatus = 0
            AND RecID > @MaxAdjNumber
3

The header that we currently use looks like this:

---------------------------------------------------
-- Produced By   : Our company  
-- URL       : www.company.com  
-- Author        : me   
-- Date      : yesterday    
-- Purpose       : to do something  
-- Called by     : some other process   
-- Modifications : some other guy - today - to fix my bug   
------------------------------------------------------------

On a side note, any comments that I place within the SQL i always use the format:

/* Comment */

As in the past I had problems where scripting (by SQL Server) does funny things wrapping lines round and comments starting -- have commented out required SQL.... but that might just be me.

  • 9
    "Date : yesterday" LOL – Jeffrey Kemp Sep 29 '11 at 9:07
1

See if this suits your requirement:

/*  

* Notes on parameters: Give the details of all parameters supplied to the proc  

* This procedure will perform the following tasks: 
 Give details description of the intent of the proc  

* Additional notes: 
Give information of something that you think needs additional mention, though is not directly related to the proc  

* Modification History:
  07/11/2001    ACL    TICKET/BUGID        CHANGE DESCRIPTION


*/
0
-- Author: 
--
-- Original creation date: 
--
-- Description: 
0

Here's what I currently use. The triple comment ( / * / * / * ) is for an integration that picks out header comments from the object definition.

/*/*/*

    Name:           pr_ProcName
    Author:         Joe Smith
    Written:        6/15/16
    Purpose:        Short description about the proc.

    Edit History:   6/15/16 - Joe Smith
                        + Initial creation.
                    6/22/16 - Jaden Smith
                        + Change source to blahblah
                        + Optimized JOIN
                    6/30/16 - Joe Smith
                        + Reverted changes made by Jaden.

*/*/*/
  • which integration is this? off-the-shelf or custom built? – unfinishedmonkey Jan 19 '17 at 16:16
  • @unfinishedmonkey custom - I built a process that scans objects for the pattern and stores the comments in a table. – chazbot7 Jan 19 '17 at 17:01
0

Here is my preferred variant:

/* =====================================================================
DESC:   Some notes about what this does
           tabbed in if you need additional lines
NOTES:  Additional notes
           tabbed in if you need additional lines
======================================================================== */

protected by Madhur Bhaiya Oct 9 at 10:37

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