919

I have a JavaScript array like:

[["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"]]

How would I go about merging the separate inner arrays into one like:

["$6", "$12", "$25", ...]
  • gist.github.com/Nishchit14/4c6a7349b3c778f7f97b912629a9f228 This link describe ES5 & ES6 flatten – Nishchit Dhanani Nov 17 '16 at 6:42
  • 14
    All of the solutions that use reduce + concat are O((N^2)/2) where as a accepted answer (just one call to concat) would be at most O(N*2) on a bad browser and O(N) on a good one. Also Denys solution is optimized for the actual question and upto 2x faster than the single concat. For the reduce folks it's fun to feel cool writing tiny code but for example if the array had 1000 one element subarrays all the reduce+concat solutions would be doing 500500 operations where as the single concat or simple loop would do 1000 operations. – gman Jul 30 '17 at 15:45
  • 1
    Simply user spread operator [].concat(...array) – Oleg Mar 30 at 19:17
  • @gman how is reduce + concat solution O((N^2)/2)? stackoverflow.com/questions/52752666/… mentions a different complexity. – Undefined Jun 19 at 12:13

67 Answers 67

3

I propose two short solutions without recursion. They are not optimal from a computational complexity point of view, but work fine in average cases:

let a = [1, [2, 3], [[4], 5, 6], 7, 8, [9, [[10]]]];

// Solution #1
while (a.find(x => Array.isArray(x)))
    a = a.reduce((x, y) => x.concat(y), []);

// Solution #2
let i = a.findIndex(x => Array.isArray(x));
while (i > -1)
{
    a.splice(i, 1, ...a[i]);
    i = a.findIndex(x => Array.isArray(x));
}
3
const flatten = array => array.reduce((a, b) => a.concat(Array.isArray(b) ? flatten(b) : b), []); 

Per request, Breaking down the one line is basically having this.

function flatten(array) {
  // reduce traverses the array and we return the result
  return array.reduce(function(acc, b) {
     // if is an array we use recursion to perform the same operations over the array we found 
     // else we just concat the element to the accumulator
     return acc.concat( Array.isArray(b) ? flatten(b) : b);
  }, []); // we initialize the accumulator on an empty array to collect all the elements
}
  • 3
    From review queue: May I request you to please add some more context around your answer. Code-only answers are difficult to understand. It will help the asker and future readers both if you can add more information in your post. – RBT May 13 '17 at 9:33
  • 1
    Your code is written in cutting-edge, shortest way but honestly It takes me more time to figure out what it is actually doing... not good for maintenance – meteorzero May 14 '17 at 20:10
  • Nice one! You can flatten array like objects too if you change Array.isArray(b) in to b.length and add a Array.from(array) after the return instead of array. – luwes Jun 10 '17 at 17:56
3

Here is a version in Typescript based on the answer by artif3x, with a bonus implementation of flatMap for Scala fans.

function flatten<T>(items: T[][]): T[] {
  return items.reduce((prev, next) => prev.concat(next), []);
}

function flatMap<T, U>(items: T[], f: (t: T) => U[]): U[] {
  return items.reduce((prev, next) => prev.concat(f(next)), new Array<U>());
}
2

Here's another deep flatten for modern browsers:

function flatten(xs) {
  xs = Array.prototype.concat.apply([], xs);
  return xs.some(Array.isArray) ? flatten(xs) : xs;
};
  • dumping code is not an answer..please explain the steps of this solution. it seems like a very elegant one, but also, complex. – vsync Dec 28 '16 at 12:28
2

if your array only consists out of integers or strings you can use this dirty hack:

var arr = [345,2,[34],2,[524,[5456]],[5456]];
var flat = arr.toString().split(',');

Works, in FF, IE and Chrome didn't test the other browsers yet.

  • Just wondering why this is a hack? I think it is a smart and simple way to do it. – Tim Hong Mar 13 '14 at 19:41
  • IMO it's a hack because it abuses the .toString() function (.toString will call for me .toString recursively) which if I recall correctly returned previously "[object Array]" instead of a recursive arr.join(',') :) – EaterOfCode Mar 14 '14 at 10:17
  • Thanks for the explanation. I have just experienced that yesterday. =) – Tim Hong Mar 15 '14 at 4:35
  • @TimHong haha I hope nothing broke – EaterOfCode Mar 17 '14 at 10:06
  • Hahaha. It was all good. I tested it before checking in anything. In the end, I wrote my own version of it. =) I pasted my answer here. (Should be on top now, since it is the newest answer.) Yeah, thanks for asking. Hahaha. – Tim Hong Mar 17 '14 at 23:00
2

I'm aware that this is hacky, but the must succinct way I know of to flatten an array(of any depth!) of strings(without commas!) is to turn the array into a string and then split the string on commas:

var myArray =[["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]];
var myFlatArray = myArray.toString().split(',');

myFlatArray;
// ["$6", "$12", "$25", "$25", "$18", "$22", "$10", "$0", "$15", "$3", "$75", "$5", "$100", "$7", "$3", "$75", "$5"]

This should work on any depth of nested arrays containing only strings and numbers(integers and floating points) with the caveat that numbers will be converted to strings in the process. This can be solved with a little mapping:

var myArray =[[[1,2],[3,4]],[[5,6],[7,8]],[[9,0]]];
var myFlatArray = myArray.toString().split(',').map(function(e) { return parseInt(e); });
myFlatArray;
// [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0]
2

To flatten a two-dimensional array in one line:

[[1, 2], [3, 4, 5]].reduce(Function.prototype.apply.bind(Array.prototype.concat))
// => [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]
  • That's pretty brilliant. It does fail at a certain nesting depth: [[1, 2], [3, 4, 5], [6, [[7]]]]. – Noah Freitas May 7 '15 at 1:54
  • Nice hack! You can shorten your code if you use the following auxiliary functions: const bindable = Function.bind.bind(Function.bind); const applicable = bindable(Function.apply); and then [[1, 2], [3, 4, 5]].reduce(applicable([].concat));. – user6445533 Aug 17 '16 at 12:59
2
/**
* flatten an array first level
* @method flatten
* @param array {Array}
* @return {Array} flatten array
*/
function flatten(array) {
  return array.reduce((acc, current) => acc.concat(current), []);
}


/**
* flatten an array recursively
* @method flattenDeep
* @param array {Array}
* @return {Array} flatten array
*/
function flattenDeep(array) {
  return array.reduce((acc, current) => {
    return Array.isArray(current) ? acc.concat(flattenDeep(current)) : acc.concat([current]);
  }, []);
}

/**
* flatten an array recursively limited by depth
* @method flattenDepth
* @param array {Array}
* @return {Array} flatten array
*/
function flattenDepth(array, depth) {
  if (depth === 0) {
    return array;
  }
  return array.reduce((acc, current) => {
    return Array.isArray(current) ? acc.concat(flattenDepth(current, --depth)) : acc.concat([current]);
  }, []);
}
  • Why do you even have a ternary operator, if the values on left and right are doing the same thing in first solution: return Array.isArray(current) ? acc.concat(current) : acc.concat([current]);? Why even check for if the item is also an array, if it's just one level :) – Om Shankar Jul 22 '18 at 21:08
  • 1
    I mean: [1,2].concat(3) is same as [1,2].concat([3]) – Om Shankar Jul 22 '18 at 21:10
2

It's better to do it in a recursive way, so if still another array inside the other array, can be filtered easily...

const flattenArray = arr =>
  arr.reduce(
    (res, cur) =>
       !Array.isArray(cur) 
       ? res.concat(cur)
       : res.concat(flattenArray(cur)), []);

And you can call it like:

flattenArray([[["Alireza"], "Dezfoolian"], ["is a"], ["developer"], [[1, [2, 3], ["!"]]]);

and the result isas below:

["Alireza", "Dezfoolian", "is a", "developer", 1, 2, 3, "!"]
  • This answer needs to be shown in a simpler fashion as a function. It's very hard to read and understand. – Perry M Mar 25 at 21:07
2

Just to add to the great solutions. I used recursion to solve this.

            const flattenArray = () => {
                let result = [];
                return function flatten(arr) {
                    for (let i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
                        if (!Array.isArray(arr[i])) {
                            result.push(arr[i]);
                        } else {
                            flatten(arr[i])
                        }
                    }
                    return result;
                }
            }

Test results: https://codepen.io/ashermike/pen/mKZrWK

1

There's a much faster way of doing this than using the merge.concat.apply() method listed in the top answer, and by faster I mean more than several orders of magnitude faster. This assumes your environment has access to the ES5 Array methods.

var array2d = [
  ["foo", "bar"],
  ["baz", "biz"]
];
merged = array2d.reduce(function(prev, next) {
    return prev.concat(next);
});

Here's the jsperf link: http://jsperf.com/2-dimensional-array-merge

1

You can flatten an array of arrays using Array.prototype.reduce() and Array.prototype.concat()

var data = [["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]].reduce(function(a, b) {
  return a.concat(b);
}, []);
console.log(data);

Related docs: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/concat

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/Reduce

1

I originally thought to use the .reduce method and recursively call a function to flatten inner arrays, however this can lead to stack overflows when you are working with a deeply nested array of deeply nested arrays. Using concat is also not the best way to go, because each iteration will create a new shallow copy of the array. What we can do instead is this:

const flatten = arr => {
    for(let i = 0; i < arr.length;) {
        const val = arr[i];
        if(Array.isArray(val)) {
            arr.splice(i, 1, ...val);
        } else {
            i ++;
        }
    }
    return arr;
}

We are not creating new arrays via concat and we are not recursively calling any functions.

http://jsbin.com/firiru/4/edit?js,console

  • is this technique really the "best"? better than mine? – vsync Nov 1 '16 at 21:38
  • sure it is. you're solution is incorrect because stringifying inner arrays will output a single string such as "3, 4" instead of 3 and 4 having separate indices. Also this solution can handle an index of any value. If the index is an array it will be flattened, if it is anything else it will remain as it is. – pizza-r0b Nov 1 '16 at 22:07
  • Not to mention this solution will elegantly handle deeply nested arrays. – pizza-r0b Nov 1 '16 at 22:16
  • why would you think mine won't handle infinite nested Array? what possibly made you say that? so in mine the whole point is NOT to break Array values which by themselves contain commas (which are part of the value) hence, my solution is still better (more readable and probably faster) – vsync Nov 1 '16 at 23:19
  • Sorry, I did misunderstand! Your solution is pretty good. The only thing is it cannot handle functions as a value at an index and this solution can, so I would have to say I would favor this. – pizza-r0b Nov 2 '16 at 0:21
1

Recursive version that works on all datatypes

 /*jshint esversion: 6 */

// nested array for testing
let nestedArray = ["firstlevel", 32, "alsofirst", ["secondlevel", 456,"thirdlevel", ["theinnerinner", 345, {firstName: "Donald", lastName: "Duck"}, "lastinner"]]];

// wrapper function to protect inner variable tempArray from global scope;
function flattenArray(arr) {

  let tempArray = [];

  function flatten(arr) {
    arr.forEach(function(element) {
      Array.isArray(element) ? flatten(element) : tempArray.push(element);     // ternary check that calls flatten() again if element is an array, hereby making flatten() recursive.
    });
  }

  // calling the inner flatten function, and then returning the temporary array
  flatten(arr);
  return tempArray;
}

// example usage:
let flatArray = flattenArray(nestedArray);
1

The following code will flatten deeply nested arrays:

/**
 * [Function to flatten deeply nested array]
 * @param  {[type]} arr          [The array to be flattened]
 * @param  {[type]} flattenedArr [The flattened array]
 * @return {[type]}              [The flattened array]
 */
function flattenDeepArray(arr, flattenedArr) {
  let length = arr.length;

  for(let i = 0; i < length; i++) {
    if(Array.isArray(arr[i])) {
      flattenDeepArray(arr[i], flattenedArr);
    } else {
      flattenedArr.push(arr[i]);
    }
  }

  return flattenedArr;
}

let arr = [1, 2, [3, 4, 5], [6, 7]];

console.log(arr, '=>', flattenDeepArray(arr, [])); // [ 1, 2, [ 3, 4, 5 ], [ 6, 7 ] ] '=>' [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ]

arr = [1, 2, [3, 4], [5, 6, [7, 8, [9, 10]]]];

console.log(arr, '=>', flattenDeepArray(arr, [])); // [ 1, 2, [ 3, 4 ], [ 5, 6, [ 7, 8, [Object] ] ] ] '=>' [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 ]
1

You can use Ramda JS flatten

var arr = [[1,2], [3], [4,5]];
var flattenedArray = R.flatten(arr); 

console.log(flattenedArray)
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/ramda/0.25.0/ramda.js"></script>

1
let arr = [["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]];
arr = arr.reduce((a, b) => a.concat(b)); // flattened
1

Ways for making flatten array

  • using Es6 flat()
  • using Es6 reduce()
  • using recursion
  • using string manipulation

[1,[2,[3,[4,[5,[6,7],8],9],10]]] - [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

// using Es6 flat() 
let arr = [1,[2,[3,[4,[5,[6,7],8],9],10]]]
console.log(arr.flat(Infinity))

// using Es6 reduce()
let flatIt = (array) => array.reduce(
  (x, y) => x.concat(Array.isArray(y) ? flatIt(y) : y), []
)
console.log(flatIt(arr))

// using recursion
function myFlat(array) {
  let flat = [].concat(...array);
  return flat.some(Array.isArray) ? myFlat(flat) : flat;
}
console.log(myFlat(arr));

// using string manipulation
let strArr = arr.toString().split(','); 
for(let i=0;i<strArr.length;i++)
  strArr[i]=parseInt(strArr[i]);

console.log(strArr)

  • 1
    Which is the fastest? – mesqueeb May 6 at 8:24
  • @mesqueeb thanks for questioning, I think simple loop is faster. – Vahid Akhtar May 6 at 10:49
0
[1,[2,3],[4,[5,6]]].reduce(function(p, c) {
    return p.concat(c instanceof Array ? 
                    c.reduce(arguments.callee, []) : 
                    [c]); 
}, []);
0

Here is my version of it. It allows you to flatten a complicated object which could be used in more scenarios:

Input

var input = {
   a: 'asdf',
   b: [1,2,3],
   c: [[1,2],[3,4]],
   d: {subA: [1,2]}
}

Code

The function is like this:

function flatten (input, output) {

  if (isArray(input)) {
    for(var index = 0, length = input.length; index < length; index++){
      flatten(input[index], output);
    }
  }
  else if (isObject(input)) {
    for(var item in input){
      if(input.hasOwnProperty(item)){
        flatten(input[item], output);
      }
    }
  }
  else {
    return output.push(input);
  }
};

function isArray(obj) {
  return Array.isArray(obj) || obj.toString() === '[object Array]';
}

function isObject(obj) {
  return obj === Object(obj);
}

Usage

var output = []

flatten(input, output);

Output

["asdf", 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2]

0

If you need to support IE8 and, therefore, can't use methods such as reduce or isArray, here is a possible solution. It is a verbose approach to help you to understand the recursive algorithm.

function flattenArray(a){

    var aFinal = [];

    (function recursiveArray(a){

        var i,
            iCount = a.length;

        if (Object.prototype.toString.call(a) === '[object Array]') {
            for (i = 0; i < iCount; i += 1){
                recursiveArray(a[i]);
            }
        } else {
            aFinal.push(a);
        }

    })(a);

    return aFinal;

}

var aMyArray = [6,3,4,[12,14,15,[23,24,25,[34,35],27,28],56],3,4];

var result = flattenArray(aMyArray);

console.log(result);
0

var arrays = [["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"], ["$0"], ["$15"],["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"], ["$100"], ["$7"], ["$3"], ["$75"], ["$5"]];
var merged = [].concat.apply([], arrays);
alert(merged);

0
Array.prototype.flatten = Array.prototype.flatten || function() {
    return [].reduce.call(this, function(flat, toFlatten) {
        return flat.concat(Array.isArray(toFlatten) ? toFlatten.flatten() : toFlatten);
    },[])
};
  • 2
    I'm reviewing, can you add some more information around your solution? Why you feel it's efficient? – Moby's Stunt Double Feb 12 '16 at 19:50
0

I didn't find here solution for large arrays when flattening is not deep. So, my version:

function flatten(arr){
    result = []
    for (e of arr)
        result.push(...e)
    return result
}
0

try this method,

arr = [["$6"], ["$12"], ["$25"], ["$25"], ["$18"], ["$22"], ["$10"]]
concat_arr = arr.concat.apply([], arr)
console.log(concat_arr)

0

For Scala users looking for a way to replicate Seq.flatten in Javascript, here is a pimp of Array:

Array.prototype.flatten = function() {
  return [].concat.apply([], this);
};

which can be used this way:

[[12, 3, 5], [1], [], [3, 4]].flatten() // [12, 3, 5, 1, 3, 4]
0

I answer this question just with ES6, assume the deep array is:

const deepArray = ['1',[['a'],['b']],[2],[[[['4',[3,'c']]]],[5]]];

If you know or guess the depth of your arrays is not more than a number like 7, use below code:

const flatArray = deepArray.flat(7);

But if you don't know the depth of your deep arrays or your JavaScript engine doesn't support flat like react-native JavaScriptCore, use below function that is used JavaScript reduce function:

 const deepFlatten = arr =>
         arr.reduce(
           (acc, val) =>
             Array.isArray(val) 
               ? acc.concat(deepFlatten(val)) 
               : acc.concat(val),
             []
         );

Both of methods return below result:

["1", "a", "b", 2, "4", 3, "c", 5]
0

I have a simple solution without using in a special js function. (like reduce etc)

const input = [[0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5]]
let flattened=[];

for (let i=0; i<input.length; ++i) {
    let current = input[i];
    for (let j=0; j<current.length; ++j)
        flattened.push(current[j]);
}
0

Much simpler and straight-forward one; with option to deep flatten;

const flatReduce = (arr, deep) => {
    return arr.reduce((acc, cur) => {
        return acc.concat(Array.isArray(cur) && deep ? flatReduce(cur, deep) : cur);
    }, []);
};

console.log(flatReduce([1, 2, [3], [4, [5]]], false)); // =>  1,2,3,4,[5]
console.log(flatReduce([1, 2, [3], [4, [5, [6, 7, 8]]]], true)); // => 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
-1

What about deep flatten & Object Oriented ?

[23, [34, 454], 12, 34].flatten();
// -->   [23,34, 454, 12, 34]

[23, [34, 454,[66,55]], 12, 34].flatten();

// -->  [23, 34, 454, [66,55], 12, 34]

DEEP Flatten :

[23, [34, 454,[66,55]], 12, 34].flatten(true);

// --> [23, 34, 454, 66, 55, 12, 34]

DEMO

CDN


If all array elements are Integer,Float,... or/and String , So just , do this trick :

var myarr=[1,[7,[9.2]],[3],90];
eval('myarr=['+myarr.toString()+']');
print(myarr);
// [1, 7, 9.2, 3, 90]

DEMO

protected by Machavity Jan 2 '18 at 20:04

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