I've been working with nodejs lately and still getting to grips with the module system so apologies if this is an obvious question. I want code roughly like the following below:

a.js (the main file run with node)

var ClassB = require("./b");

var ClassA = function() {
    this.thing = new ClassB();
    this.property = 5;
}

var a = new ClassA();

module.exports = a;

b.js

var a = require("./a");

var ClassB = function() {
}

ClassB.prototype.doSomethingLater() {
    util.log(a.property);
}

module.exports = ClassB;

My problem seems to be that I can't access the instance of ClassA from within an instance of ClassB.

Is there a correct / better way to structure modules to achieve what I want? Is there a better way to share variables between modules?

  • I suggest you look in to command query separation, observable pattern and then what the CS guys call managers - which is basically a wrapper for the observable pattern. – dewwwald Oct 16 '17 at 19:00

12 Answers 12

up vote 57 down vote accepted

While node.js does allow circular require dependencies, as you've found it can be pretty messy and you're probably better off restructuring your code to not need it. Maybe create a third class that uses the other two to accomplish what you need.

  • 3
    +1 This is the right answer. Circular dependencies are code smell. If A and B are always used together they are effectively a single module, so merge them. Or find a way of breaking the dependency; maybe its a composite pattern. – James Sep 30 '14 at 11:39
  • 62
    Not always. in database models, for example, if I have model A and B, in model A I may want to reference model B (e.g. to join operations), and vice-versa. Therefore, export several A and B properties (the ones that does not depend on other modules) before use the "require" function may be a better answer. – Joaobrunoah Jan 26 '15 at 18:38
  • 7
    I also don't see circular dependencies as code smell. I'm developing a system where there are a few cases where it is needed. For example, modeling teams and users, where users can belong to many teams. So, it's not that something is wrong with my modeling. Obviously, I could refactor my code to avoid the circular dependency between the two entities, but that would not be the most pure form of the domain model, so I will not do that. – Alexandre Martini Sep 6 '16 at 11:02
  • Then should I inject the dependency when needed, is that what you mean? Using a third to control the interaction between the two dependencies with the cyclic problem? – giovannipds May 23 '17 at 14:00
  • 1
    This is not messy.. someone may want to brake a file to avoid a book of code i a single file. As node suggests you should add an exports = {} at the top of your code and then exports = yourData at the end of your code. With this practice you will avoid almost all errors from circular dependencies. – mrapsogos Jan 29 at 11:11

Try to set properties on module.exports, instead of replacing it completely. E.g., module.exports.instance = new ClassA() in a.js, module.exports.ClassB = ClassB in b.js. When you make circular module dependencies, the requiring module will get a reference to an incomplete module.exports from the required module, which you can add other properties latter on, but when you set the entire module.exports, you actually create a new object which the requiring module has no way to access.

  • 22
    This is should be the right answer! – Morgan Cheng Feb 14 '14 at 9:59
  • 4
    This might be all true, but I would say still avoid circular dependencies. Making special arrangements to deal with modules that have incompletely loaded sounds like it will create a future problem you don't want to have. This answer prescribes a solution to how to deal with incompletely loaded modules...I don't think that's a good idea. – Alexander Mills Jun 1 '15 at 19:05
  • 1
    How would you put a class constructor in module.exports without fully replacing it, to allow other classes to 'construct' an instance of the class? – Tim Visée Aug 7 '16 at 12:21
  • I don't think you can. Modules that have imported your module already will not be able to see that change – lanzz Aug 7 '16 at 14:37

[EDIT] it's not 2015 and most libraries (i.e. express) have made updates with better patterns so circular dependencies are no longer necessary. I recommend simply not using them.


I know I'm digging up an old answer here... The issue here is that module.exports is defined after you require ClassB. (which JohnnyHK's link shows) Circular dependencies work great in Node, they're just defined synchronously. When used properly, they actually solve a lot of common node issues (like accessing express.js app from other files)

Just make sure your necessary exports are defined before you require a file with a circular dependency.

This will break:

var ClassA = function(){};
var ClassB = require('classB'); //will require ClassA, which has no exports yet

module.exports = ClassA;

This will work:

var ClassA = module.exports = function(){};
var ClassB = require('classB');

I use this pattern all the time for accessing the express.js app in other files:

var express = require('express');
var app = module.exports = express();
// load in other dependencies, which can now require this file and use app

Sometimes it is really artificial to introduce a third class (as JohnnyHK advises), so in addition to Ianzz: If you do want to replace the module.exports, for example if you're creating a class (like the b.js file in the above example), this is possible as well, just make sure that in the file that is starting the circular require, the 'module.exports = ...' statement happens before the require statement.

a.js (the main file run with node)

var ClassB = require("./b");

var ClassA = function() {
    this.thing = new ClassB();
    this.property = 5;
}

var a = new ClassA();

module.exports = a;

b.js

var ClassB = function() {
}

ClassB.prototype.doSomethingLater() {
    util.log(a.property);
}

module.exports = ClassB;

var a = require("./a"); // <------ this is the only necessary change
  • thanks coen, I had never realized that module.exports had an effect on circular dependencies. – Laurent Perrin Mar 13 '13 at 18:23

The solution is to 'forward declare' your exports object before requiring any other controller. So if you structure all your modules like this and you won't run into any issues like that:

// Module exports forward declaration:
module.exports = {

};

// Controllers:
var other_module = require('./other_module');

// Functions:
var foo = function () {

};

// Module exports injects:
module.exports.foo = foo;
  • 2
    Actually, this led me to simply use exports.foo = function() {...} instead. Definitely did the trick. Thanks! – zanona Nov 12 '16 at 23:53
  • isn't module.exports already an empty object?? – Muhammad Umer Oct 4 at 5:26

A solution which require minimal change is extending module.exports instead of overriding it.

a.js - app entry point and module which use method do from b.js*

_ = require('underscore'); //underscore provides extend() for shallow extend
b = require('./b'); //module `a` uses module `b`
_.extend(module.exports, {
    do: function () {
        console.log('doing a');
    }
});
b.do();//call `b.do()` which in turn will circularly call `a.do()`

b.js - module which use method do from a.js

_ = require('underscore');
a = require('./a');

_.extend(module.exports, {
    do: function(){
        console.log('doing b');
        a.do();//Call `b.do()` from `a.do()` when `a` just initalized 
    }
})

It will work and produce:

doing b
doing a

While this code will not work:

a.js

b = require('./b');
module.exports = {
    do: function () {
        console.log('doing a');
    }
};
b.do();

b.js

a = require('./a');
module.exports = {
    do: function () {
        console.log('doing b');
    }
};
a.do();

Output:

node a.js
b.js:7
a.do();
    ^    
TypeError: a.do is not a function
  • 1
    This is the only answer that worked for me in this thread. – sevensevens Dec 2 '16 at 16:30
  • 2
    If you don't have underscore, then ES6's Object.assign() can do the same work that _.extend() is doing in this answer. – joeytwiddle Jan 2 '17 at 6:57

What about lazy requiring only when you need to? So your b.js looks as follows

var ClassB = function() {
}
ClassB.prototype.doSomethingLater() {
    var a = require("./a");    //a.js has finished by now
    util.log(a.property);
}
module.exports = ClassB;

Of course it is good practice to put all require statements on top of the file. But there are occasions, where I forgive myself for picking something out of an otherwise unrelated module. Call it a hack, but sometimes this is better than introducing a further dependency, or adding an extra module or adding new structures (EventEmitter, etc)

An other method I've seen people do is exporting at the first line and saving it as a local variable like this:

let self = module.exports = {};

const a = require('./a');

// Exporting the necessary functions
self.func = function() { ... }

I tend to use this method, do you know about any downsides of it?

Actually I ended up requiring my dependency with

 var a = null;
 process.nextTick(()=>a=require("./a")); //Circular reference!

not pretty, but it works. It is more understandable and honest than changing b.js (for example only augmenting modules.export), which otherwise is perfect as is.

  • Of all the solutions on this page, this is the only one that solved my problem. I tried each in turn. – Joe Lapp Oct 17 '17 at 22:35

Similar to lanzz and setect's answers, I have been using the following pattern:

module.exports = Object.assign(module.exports, {
    firstMember: ___,
    secondMember: ___,
});

The Object.assign() copies the members into the exports object that has already been given to other modules.

The = assignment is logically redundant, since it is just setting module.exports to itself, but I am using it because it helps my IDE (WebStorm) to recognise that firstMember is a property of this module, so "Go To -> Declaration" (Cmd-B) and other tooling will work from other files.

This pattern is not very pretty, so I only use it when a cyclic dependency issue needs to be resolved.

You can solve this easily: just export your data before you require anything else in modules where you use module.exports:

classA.js

class ClassA {

    constructor(){
        ClassB.someMethod();
        ClassB.anotherMethod();
    };

    static someMethod () {
        console.log( 'Class A Doing someMethod' );
    };

    static anotherMethod () {
        console.log( 'Class A Doing anotherMethod' );
    };

};

module.exports = ClassA;
var ClassB = require( "./classB.js" );

let classX = new ClassA();

classB.js

class ClassB {

    constructor(){
        ClassA.someMethod();
        ClassA.anotherMethod();
    };

    static someMethod () {
        console.log( 'Class B Doing someMethod' );
    };

    static anotherMethod () {
        console.log( 'Class A Doing anotherMethod' );
    };

};

module.exports = ClassB;
var ClassA = require( "./classA.js" );

let classX = new ClassB();

for your problem, you can use function declarations.

class-b.js:

var ClassA = require('./class-a')

module.exports = ClassB

function ClassB() {

}

class-a.js:

var classB = require('./class-b')

module.exports = ClassA

function ClassA() {

}

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