5

Please compare two ways of setting/returning an array:

static public float[] test_arr_speeds_1( int a ) {
  return new float[]{ a, a + 1, a + 2, a + 3, a + 4, a + 5,
                      a + 6, a + 7, a + 8, a + 9 };
} // or e.g. field = new float... in method

static public float[] test_arr_speeds_2( int a ) {
  float[] ret = new float[10];
  ret[0] = a;
  ret[1] = a + 1;
  ret[2] = a + 2;
  ret[3] = a + 3;
  ret[4] = a + 4;
  ret[5] = a + 5;
  ret[6] = a + 6;
  ret[7] = a + 7;
  ret[8] = a + 8;
  ret[9] = a + 9;
  return ret;
} // or e.g. field[0] = ... in method

Both generate distinct bytecodes and both can be decompiled to their former state. After checking the execution times via profiler (100M iterations, unbiased, different environs), the time of _1 method is approx. 4/3 the time of _2, even though both create a new array and both set every field to a given value. The times are negligible most of the time, but this still bugs me - why is _1 visibly slower? Can anybody check/confirm/explain it to me in a reasonable, JVM-supported way?

  • 1
    Are the corresponding bytecode representations short enough to post here? – Oliver Charlesworth Jun 3 '12 at 12:13
  • 1
    The average times of 1000 * 1000000 calls are the same for both methods, at least for me. – IchBinKeinBaum Jun 3 '12 at 12:26
6

Here is the difference between bytecode (only for first two items). First method:

bipush  10
newarray float      //creating an array with reference on operand stack

dup
iconst_0
iload_0
i2f
fastore             //setting first element

dup
iconst_1
iload_0
iconst_1
iadd
i2f
fastore             //setting second element

//...
areturn             //returning the top of the operand stack

Second method:

bipush  10
newarray float
astore_1            //creating an array and storing it in local variable

aload_1
iconst_0
iload_0
i2f
fastore             //setting first element

aload_1
iconst_1
iload_0
iconst_1
iadd
i2f
fastore             //setting second element

//...
aload_1
areturn

As you can see the only difference is that the array reference is kept on operand stack in the first scenario (that's why dup appears so many times - to avoid loosing a reference to an array after fastore) while in the second scenario the array reference is kept on normal stack (where method arguments and local variables are kept). In this scenario the reference must be read all the time (aload_1) because fastore requires arrayref to be on on the operand stack.

We shouldn't make assumptions based on this bytecode - after all it is translated to CPU instructions by and most likely in both cases array reference is stored in one of the CPU registers. Otherwise the performance difference would be huge.

If you can measure the difference and you are doing so low-level optimizations - pick the version that is faster. But I doubt the difference is "portable" (depending on the architecture and JVM version/implementation you will observer different timing behaviour). That being said - I would go for more readable version, rather than the one that happens to be faster on your computer.

  • 1
    awesome analysis! – AlexR Jun 3 '12 at 12:38
  • That's exactly what I was looking for. Indeed, the difference seems to exist only in operand/normal stack use - and I agree that it's too low-level to bother most of the time, I just wondered about the reason. I too prefer readable code over "optimized" code. – vaxquis Jun 3 '12 at 12:44

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