243

How to convert real numpy array to int numpy array? Tried using map directly to array but it did not work.

327

Use the astype method.

>>> x = np.array([[1.0, 2.3], [1.3, 2.9]])
>>> x
array([[ 1. ,  2.3],
       [ 1.3,  2.9]])
>>> x.astype(int)
array([[1, 2],
       [1, 2]])
  • 26
    Just make sure you don't have np.infor np.nan in your array, since they have surprising results. For example, np.array([np.inf]).astype(int) outputs array([-9223372036854775808]). – Garrett Jan 22 '15 at 8:42
  • On my machine, np.array([np.inf]).astype(int), np.array([-np.inf]).astype(int), and np.array([np.nan]).astype(int) all return the same thing. Why? – BallpointBen May 14 '18 at 20:47
  • 1
    @BallpointBen: nan and inf are floating-point values and can't be meaningfully converted to int. As the comment before yours notes, there will be surprising behavior, and I don't think the precise behavior is well-defined. If you want to map nan and inf to certain values, you need to do that yourself. – BrenBarn May 15 '18 at 18:21
  • Note that x.astype(int)[0][0] is not of type int. It's numpy.int32. – Chris Anderson Jun 6 '18 at 19:34
56

Some numpy functions for how to control the rounding: rint, floor,trunc, ceil. depending how u wish to round the floats, up, down, or to the nearest int.

>>> x = np.array([[1.0,2.3],[1.3,2.9]])
>>> x
array([[ 1. ,  2.3],
       [ 1.3,  2.9]])
>>> y = np.trunc(x)
>>> y
array([[ 1.,  2.],
       [ 1.,  2.]])
>>> z = np.ceil(x)
>>> z
array([[ 1.,  3.],
       [ 2.,  3.]])
>>> t = np.floor(x)
>>> t
array([[ 1.,  2.],
       [ 1.,  2.]])
>>> a = np.rint(x)
>>> a
array([[ 1.,  2.],
       [ 1.,  3.]])

To make one of this in to int, or one of the other types in numpy, astype (as answered by BrenBern):

a.astype(int)
array([[1, 2],
       [1, 3]])

>>> y.astype(int)
array([[1, 2],
       [1, 2]])
  • 1
    Exactly what I was looking for. astype is often too generic, and I think it probably is more useful when doing intx - inty conversions. When I want to do float - int conversion being able to choose the kind of rounding is a nice feature. – Bakuriu Sep 11 '12 at 7:03
  • 10
    So the simplest way to safely convert almost-ints like 7.99999 to ints like 8, is np.rint(arr).astype(int)? – endolith Oct 12 '12 at 18:53
  • any way in numpy to make it uint8? – Ryan Feb 6 '18 at 12:47
  • @Ryan astype(np.uint8) – Chris Anderson Jun 6 '18 at 19:28
10

you can use np.int_:

>>> x = np.array([[1.0, 2.3], [1.3, 2.9]])
>>> x
array([[ 1. ,  2.3],
       [ 1.3,  2.9]])
>>> np.int_(x)
array([[1, 2],
       [1, 2]])
9

If you're not sure your input is going to be a Numpy array, you can use asarray with dtype=int instead of astype:

>>> np.asarray([1,2,3,4], dtype=int)
array([1, 2, 3, 4])

If the input array already has the correct dtype, asarray avoids the array copy while astype does not (unless you specify copy=False):

>>> a = np.array([1,2,3,4])
>>> a is np.asarray(a)  # no copy :)
True
>>> a is a.astype(int)  # copy :(
False
>>> a is a.astype(int, copy=False)  # no copy :)
True

protected by Sheldore Jul 5 at 9:51

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.