3

A TCP server is sending data frames continuosly every 8ms. I want to program a client able to receive these data frames. Is there any procedure in Indy 9 to know if there is data available in the buffer?

My current programs is the following (I am using a Thread):

procedure TThreadRead.Execute;
var
  buffer: array [0..755] of byte;
  //s1: string;
  //i: integer;
begin
  IdTCPClient1.RecvBufferSize:= 756;
  IdTCPClient1.Connect;
  while Terminated = false do
  begin
    if IdTCPClient1.InputBuffer.Size = 0 then
       IdTCPClient1.ReadFromStack(True,0,False);
    while IdTCPClient1.InputBuffer.Size > 0 do
    begin
       ReadBuffer(buffer, FClient.InputBuffer.Size);
       //s1:= '';
       //For i:=0 To Length(buffer)-1 Do
       //  s1:=s1+IntToHex(Ord(buffer[i]),2); //Read values-->global var
       //Form1.Memo1.Text:=s1;
    end;
  end;
end;

Is there any more efficient solution for reading TCP data continuously (like onread event in UDP)?

Thanks in advance.

6

TIdTCPClient is not an asynchronous component. It does not tell you when data arrives. You need to use a Timer or a Thread to periodically poll the socket for new data (TIdUDPServer uses an internal thread to trigger its OnUDPRead event), eg:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  IdTCPClient1.Connect;
  Timer1.Enabled := True;
end;

procedure TForm1.Button2Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Timer1.Enabled := False;
  IdTCPClient1.Disconnect;
end;

procedure TForm1.Timer1Timer(Sender: TObject);
var
  s1: string;
begin
  s1 := IdTCPClient1.CurrentReadBuffer;
  ...
end;

With that said, CurrentReadBuffer() is generally not the best choice to use. Typically you would do something more like this instead:

procedure TForm1.Timer1Timer(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Timer1.Enabled := False;

  IdTCPClient1.ReadFromStack(True, 0, False);

  while IdTCPClient1.InputBuffer.Size > 0 do
  begin
    // read one complete frame and process as needed ...
  end;

  Timer1.Enabled := True;
end;

Update: given new information about the frame structure and your switch to a thread, you should be doing this instead:

procedure TThreadRead.Execute;
var
  buffer: array of Byte;
  numbytes: Integer;
begin
  SetLength(buffer, 0);
  IdTCPClient1.Connect;
  try
    while not Terminated do
    begin
      numbytes := StrToInt('$' + IdTCPClient1.ReadString(8)) - 8;
      if numbytes <> Length(buffer) then
        SetLength(buffer, numbytes);
      if numbytes > 0 then
        IdTCPClient1.ReadBuffer(buffer[0], numbytes);
      // process buffer up to numbytes as needed...
    end;
  finally
    IdTCPClient1.Disconnect;
  end;
end;
  • I am doing something wrong, because your code is not working... why do you read from stack when inputbuffer.size = 0? Why is not CurrentReadBuffer() the best choice to use? Is TidTCPServer an asynchronous component? Maybe it is easier to use a TCP server for reading data... – user1361263 Jun 5 '12 at 9:42
  • Indy does not read data from the socket (ie the Stack) until you tell it to read something. When the timer triggers, it checks if the InputBuffer is empty, and if so then calls ReadFromStack() to read whatever data is currently in the socket at that moment, if any, and puts it in the InputBuffer. The code does not try to process any frames until data has reached the InputBuffer first, indicating that there is something available to process. If your InputBuffer is always empty, even after calling ReadFromStack(), then the server is never sending any data to your client at all. – Remy Lebeau Jun 5 '12 at 17:36
  • You cannot use TIdTCPServer to communicate with another server. You have to use TIdTCPClient for that. – Remy Lebeau Jun 5 '12 at 17:38
  • If your server really is sending data frames every 8ms, then there is no benefit to doing the InputBuffer.Size checking at all. Just call ReadFromStack() immediately and then read as many frames are present in the InputBuffer, and then set the timer interval as low as you can (better would be to use a separate thread instead, since TTimer cannot operate at 8ms precision). Doing the kind of Size checking I showed is more beneficial when there are longer delays between the frames. – Remy Lebeau Jun 5 '12 at 17:44
  • I have updated my answer accordingly, though the earlier InputBuffer.Size checking code should have worked fine. – Remy Lebeau Jun 5 '12 at 17:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.