1

I have a number like this: int num = 36729; and I want to get the number of digits that compose the number (in this case 5 digits).

How can I do this?

9

Use this formula:

if(num)
  return floor(log10(abs((double) num)) + 1);

return 1;
| improve this answer | |
  • This also fails for num == 0 (and again for each num <=0) - though I do admire the elegance of using log. If one can assume num > 0 I doubt there is more elegant solution. Any case - this can be fixed easily as a preprocess – amit Jun 4 '12 at 18:45
  • 2
    You got my +1 after this edit. Elegant. Note that for num < 0 (if possible) you can multiple with -1 before you take log10, (and add 1 if the - sign should also be counted). – amit Jun 4 '12 at 19:05
  • For edge cases where this doesn't work -- if double isn't capable of exactly representing every value of int, then your input might get rounded prior to the log10, and give the wrong answer. Of course a 64 bit IEEE double can represent every value of a 32bit int exactly, so that doesn't apply to any normal-looking C implementation. Provided the input is exact, when it's a power of 10 log10 should (as a QoI issue) give an exact output. But the C standard doesn't say how accurate math ops are, so if it were to give output 1.9999999-ish for input 100.0, then again you're in trouble. – Steve Jessop Jun 4 '12 at 20:40
  • I should probably have said "hypothetical edge cases", it's just that double mathematics where it really matters whether the result is slightly out make me panic. In this case floor creates an off-by-one error if the result is slightly below the true value, which is pretty much the definition of a highly unstable numerical computation. But it's easy enough to check any given implementation, to make sure the result never is slightly low. – Steve Jessop Jun 4 '12 at 20:54
2
int digits = 0;
while (num > 0) {
  ++digits;
  num = num / 10;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Note that it fails for num == 0 , this case should be handled manually. In fact for all num <= 0 the answer will be 0.. Of course it is not an issue if one can assume num > 0 – amit Jun 4 '12 at 18:42
  • amit, good point. You can handle 0 and negative numbers before this snippet (negative numbers also depends on if the - char is considered a "digit"). – Emil Vikström Jun 4 '12 at 18:45
  • Yeap, never said it is not doable, just have to be handled manually :) – amit Jun 4 '12 at 18:46
  • @amit 0 is the correct answer for n == 0. You wouldn't say 00050 has 5 digits, it has 2. Likewise 0 has no digits. – Paul Jun 4 '12 at 19:44
  • @PaulP.R.O.: I disagree for the specific case of 0, but I guess this is definition dependent. – amit Jun 4 '12 at 19:53
1

Hint: use the / and the % operators.

| improve this answer | |
  • How? Could you make me an example using %? – Nick Jun 4 '12 at 19:05
  • You would only need % if you also want the list of digit values. – wberry Jun 4 '12 at 20:36
1
int unsigned_digit_count(unsigned val) {
    int count = 0;
    do {
        count++;
        val /= 10;
    } while (val);
    return count;
}

int digit_count(int val) {
    if (val < 0) {
        return 1+unsigned_digit_count(-val); // extra digit for the '-'
    } else {
        return unsigned_digit_count(val);
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0
int findcount(int num) 
{ 
    int count = 0; 
    if(num != 0){
      while(num) { 
          num /= 10; 
          count ++; 
      } 
      return count ; 
    }
    else
      return 1;
} 
| improve this answer | |
  • If num is 0 the number of digits is 1. – gliderkite Jun 4 '12 at 19:08
  • As explained by Amit here the condiion for num ==0 will be handelled manually. – Jainendra Jun 4 '12 at 19:18
  • Souldn't 0 have 0 digits. You wouldn't say 00050 has 5 digits, it has 2. – Paul Jun 4 '12 at 19:43
  • @PaulP.R.O. 00050 and 50 have the same value, but 0 and ` ` do not. – JAB Jun 4 '12 at 19:56
  • @JAB Don't they? 0 is just a mathematical representation of nil. It's the absence of quantity. I think you are thinking of 0 as a string rather than the actual value it represents. – Paul Jun 4 '12 at 20:02
0

For any input other than 0, compute the base-10 logarithm of the absolute value of the input, take the floor of that result and add 1:

int dig;
...
if (input == 0)
  dig = 1;
else
  dig = (int) floor(log10(abs((double) input))) + 1;

0 is a special case and has to be handled separately.

| improve this answer | |
0

Inefficient, but strangely elegant...

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
    // code to get value
    char str[50];
    sprintf(str, "%d", value);

    printf("The %d has %d digits.\n", value, strlen(str));

    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Provided that you have a C99-compliant snprintf (i.e. not Microsoft's _snprintf), its return value is the number of characters required. So you could save a separate call to strlen and do it in one line: return snprintf(0, 0, "%d", value);. – Steve Jessop Jun 4 '12 at 20:42
  • @SteveJessop Ah, that's a nice tip. – JAB Jun 4 '12 at 20:46
-1

Can't you do this ?

    int num = 36729;
    num.ToString().Length
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    That's C#, Java, and maybe C++/CLI, but it's not C – nategoose Jun 4 '12 at 20:50

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