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I'm loading 9 images from a database and my syntax looks roughly like this:

<img src="image_loader.php?id=4"></img>

My PHP for image_loader.php looks like:

<?php
    /* I set up my connection using mysql_connect and mysql_select_db */

    $query = sprintf("SELECT ... FROM ... WHERE id='".$_GET["id"]."'");
    $result = mysql_query($query, $con);
    mysql_close($con);

    if (!$result) {
        // no result
    }
    else {
        $row = mysql_fetch_row($result); 
        header('Content-type: image/png');
        echo $row[0];
        mysql_free_result($result);
        }
?>

Each image is about 10-13k but the bunch seems to be loading very slow. I realize that there is some bottle-necking in the number of requests a browser can execute at a time but the wait times seem to be gratuitous.

Any suggestions on how to get images loaded from a database fast?

Also, and this is almost a separate question, but is it possible to instruct a browser (or server) to cache images with now .gif/.png/.jpg srcs? It seems that Firefox does and Chrome doesn't, but I'm not certain of this.

enter image description here

  • If your cache header is correctly set and the URL don't changes, images should be cached. If your problem is on the bandwidth and you frequently send the same images, you should consider combining them so that there is only one query to server (really depends on the images, though, it pays for a dozen of small images for example). – Denys Séguret Jun 4 '12 at 19:25
  • It is possible that your browser isn't caching the images because they have query strings, could could consider linking to something like image_loader\4.jpg and using URL rewriting. You could also "tile" the images as dystroy suggests using a technique similar to the one outlines here. – jedwards Jun 4 '12 at 19:29
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    I'd also consider whether storing images in a database makes the most sense. It may, but it should be seriously considered, as giving each image a unique filename in the filesystem and storing that in the database will often be faster. You would gain additional speed if you could request that file directly from the client as opposed to requesting a generic PHP script that does an fopen() – jedwards Jun 4 '12 at 19:31
  • That's true but this shouldn't even be measurable in such a case (for a normal database). – Denys Séguret Jun 4 '12 at 19:32
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    @vpiTriumph, is the hostname in your mysql_connect() function localhost or something else? (If its something else, what exactly it is doesn't matter). If its not localhost, I'd suggest instrumenting your image_loader.php code with timestamps to locate the delay? My guess is that it'll be in the query. – jedwards Jun 4 '12 at 19:59
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I'd first consider whether storing images in a database makes the most sense. It may, but it should be seriously considered, as giving each image a unique filename in the filesystem and storing that in the database will often be faster.

You would gain additional speed if you could request that file directly from the client as opposed to requesting a generic PHP script that does some sort of fopen()-style abstraction.

In order to narrow down the source of delay, it first might be helpful to check whether your database is hosted on the same server as your webserver. One indication that it is not hosted locally but on a remote database server is to check the host string you're providing in the mysql_connect() call. localhost would suggest its local, something else would suggest it's not. As a note, many shared hosted services (e.g. GoDaddy) split their database server from the webserver.

For a better idea of the source of the delay, I'd suggest instrumenting your image_loader.php code with timestamps to locate the delay? My guess is that it'll be in the query.

If the delay is in your query, you will want to limit the number of queries you make. A strategy that allows you to make one query instead of 9 would limit the impact any webserver-to-database server delay.

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