0

I have a lambda statement that has a mapping like this:

public enum Status
{
    Completed,
    InComplete,
    Ok
}

Query:

var courses = query.Select(c => new SomeModel
      {
          Status = c.someQuery() ? Status.Completed : Status.Ok
      });

So I want Status to have multiple if statements and not just a ternary operation. For eg.

var courses = query.Select(c => new SomeModel
      {
          Status = if(c.someQuery())
                   { 
                       return Status.Completed;
                   }
                   else if(c.someOtherQuery())
                   {
                       return Status.InComplete;
                   }
                   else if(c.someOtherQuery1())
                   {
                       return Status.Ok;
                   }
      });

So how do I accomplish something like this? I am using Entity framework ORM.

  • 2
    It's very important to distinguish between whether you are using an ORM such as L2S or Entity Framework that translates your lambdas into SQL (in which case your options are severely limited) or whether it's just an ordinary lambda. In other words, what is the type of query? – Kirk Woll Jun 5 '12 at 1:03
  • @KirkWoll query may be operating on the context, someQuery may be joins, wheres, any, etc combined. – Shawn Mclean Jun 5 '12 at 1:07
  • If the query is L2S or EF you may need to enumerate on the original query ( such as calling .ToList()) before running ternary statement against it. – The Muffin Man Jun 5 '12 at 1:10
5

You could nest your ternary operations:

Status = c.someQuery() ? Status.Completed : 
    c.someOtherQuery() ? Status.InComplete : Status.Ok 
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    it may be possible to do it, but its not necessary a good idea. IMHO its a bit of a code smell – Jason Kulatunga Jun 5 '12 at 1:18
  • 2
    @Jason, there's nothing wrong with this. The term "code smell" makes me noxious and I think is a lazy way of saying, "I do not know what is wrong with this code, but I'm going to assume there's something wrong with it anyway because my gut says so." – Kirk Woll Jun 5 '12 at 1:49
  • 2
    With parentheses to make it clear which one goes first, I don't think it's too much of a code smell. – Tim S. Jun 5 '12 at 2:19
2

Could you perhaps do it like this?

myObjects
        .Where(d => d.isTrue == true && d.Value == 77)
        .Update(e => { e.Value = 1; e.isTrue = false; } );

Use my linq carefully, it could explode at any moment ;-)

    /// <summary>
    /// Used to modify properties of an object returned from a LINQ query
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TSource">The type of the source.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="input">The source</param>
    /// <param name="updater">The action to perform.</param>
    public static TSource Update<TSource>(this TSource input, Action<TSource> updater)
    {
        if (!updater.IsNull() && !input.IsNull())
        {
            updater(input);
        }
        return input;
    }

To explain this fully:

    public DataRow DoSomething(DataRow dataRow)
    {
        //DoSomething
        return dataRow;
    }

    var query = from dataRow in myDataTable.Rows.Cast<DataRow>()
                where
                    Double.TryParse(dataRow["Distance"].ToString(), out distance)
                    && distance > (11) && distance <= 99
                select dataRow.Update(f => DoSomething(f));

So you can run a method(someOtherQuery) and return an enum within your LINQ, without the nesting (which is baaaaaaad... IMHO).

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    My head just exploded: e.true = false – Ivo Jun 5 '12 at 1:14
  • hahahahaha, I just ripped out code that was real as I don't like to put my real data structures out on the net. Never know who's watching ;) - Also, an up vote for making me literally lol ! – Faraday Jun 5 '12 at 1:16
1

As that logic couldn't be translated to a T-SQL statement, you'll need to do that in memory. What I would do is to add that logic to your model:

var courses = query.ToList().Select(c => new SomeModel
  {
      Status = c.GetStatus();
  });

public class SomeModel 
{
   ...

   public Status GetStatus()
   {
      if(this.someQuery())
      { 
          return Status.Completed;
      }
      else if(this.someOtherQuery())
      {
           return Status.InComplete;
      }
      else if(this.someOtherQuery1())
      {
          return Status.Ok;
      }
      ...
   }
}

Note that calling ToList() will execute the query using EntityFramework and the Select will be executed against the object list.

| improve this answer | |

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