49

Is there a canonical way to test to see if the process has administrative privileges on a machine?

I'm going to be starting a long running process, and much later in the process' lifetime it's going to attempt some things that require admin privileges.

I'd like to be able to test up front if the process has those rights rather than later on.

77

This will check if user is in the local Administrators group (assuming you're not checking for domain admin permissions)

using System.Security.Principal;

public bool IsUserAdministrator()
{
    //bool value to hold our return value
    bool isAdmin;
    WindowsIdentity user = null;
    try
    {
        //get the currently logged in user
        user = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent();
        WindowsPrincipal principal = new WindowsPrincipal(user);
        isAdmin = principal.IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator);
    }
    catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
    {
        isAdmin = false;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        isAdmin = false;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (user != null)
            user.Dispose();
    }
    return isAdmin;
}
  • 3
    This will determine if the user is in the BUILTIN\Administrators group, but will it show if the user is elevated on Vista? – John Saunders Jul 6 '09 at 20:33
  • 5
    @Jared: it also hides any serious errors that may happen in that block. It should be removed. – John Saunders Jul 6 '09 at 20:42
  • 3
    This won't work in Vista if UAC is enabled. The reason is that UAC creates a "split token" for users with admin priveleges and the "split token" explicitly excludes all admin roles (including things like "Domain Admin"). – Jacob Proffitt Jul 6 '09 at 23:05
  • 11
    I tested this on Windows Server 2008 with UAC enabled. It works like this: elevated administrator -> true, non-elevated administrator -> false, standard user -> false – Joe Daley Apr 21 '10 at 0:39
  • 3
    @Jacob Proffitt If you are non elevated admin principal.IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator); will return false, it only returns true if you are a elevated admin. – Scott Chamberlain Jun 20 '11 at 0:17
27

Starting with Wadih M's code, I've got some additional P/Invoke code to try and handle the case of when UAC is on.

http://www.davidmoore.info/blog/2011/06/20/how-to-check-if-the-current-user-is-an-administrator-even-if-uac-is-on/

First, we’ll need some code to support the GetTokenInformation API call:

[DllImport("advapi32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
static extern bool GetTokenInformation(IntPtr tokenHandle, TokenInformationClass tokenInformationClass, IntPtr tokenInformation, int tokenInformationLength, out int returnLength);

/// <summary>
/// Passed to <see cref="GetTokenInformation"/> to specify what
/// information about the token to return.
/// </summary>
enum TokenInformationClass
{
     TokenUser = 1,
     TokenGroups,
     TokenPrivileges,
     TokenOwner,
     TokenPrimaryGroup,
     TokenDefaultDacl,
     TokenSource,
     TokenType,
     TokenImpersonationLevel,
     TokenStatistics,
     TokenRestrictedSids,
     TokenSessionId,
     TokenGroupsAndPrivileges,
     TokenSessionReference,
     TokenSandBoxInert,
     TokenAuditPolicy,
     TokenOrigin,
     TokenElevationType,
     TokenLinkedToken,
     TokenElevation,
     TokenHasRestrictions,
     TokenAccessInformation,
     TokenVirtualizationAllowed,
     TokenVirtualizationEnabled,
     TokenIntegrityLevel,
     TokenUiAccess,
     TokenMandatoryPolicy,
     TokenLogonSid,
     MaxTokenInfoClass
}

/// <summary>
/// The elevation type for a user token.
/// </summary>
enum TokenElevationType
{
    TokenElevationTypeDefault = 1,
    TokenElevationTypeFull,
    TokenElevationTypeLimited
}

Then, the actual code to detect if the user is an Administrator (returning true if they are, otherwise false).

var identity = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent();
if (identity == null) throw new InvalidOperationException("Couldn't get the current user identity");
var principal = new WindowsPrincipal(identity);

// Check if this user has the Administrator role. If they do, return immediately.
// If UAC is on, and the process is not elevated, then this will actually return false.
if (principal.IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator)) return true;

// If we're not running in Vista onwards, we don't have to worry about checking for UAC.
if (Environment.OSVersion.Platform != PlatformID.Win32NT || Environment.OSVersion.Version.Major < 6)
{
     // Operating system does not support UAC; skipping elevation check.
     return false;
}

int tokenInfLength = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(int));
IntPtr tokenInformation = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(tokenInfLength);

try
{
    var token = identity.Token;
    var result = GetTokenInformation(token, TokenInformationClass.TokenElevationType, tokenInformation, tokenInfLength, out tokenInfLength);

    if (!result)
    {
        var exception = Marshal.GetExceptionForHR( Marshal.GetHRForLastWin32Error() );
        throw new InvalidOperationException("Couldn't get token information", exception);
    }

    var elevationType = (TokenElevationType)Marshal.ReadInt32(tokenInformation);

    switch (elevationType)
    {
        case TokenElevationType.TokenElevationTypeDefault:
            // TokenElevationTypeDefault - User is not using a split token, so they cannot elevate.
            return false;
        case TokenElevationType.TokenElevationTypeFull:
            // TokenElevationTypeFull - User has a split token, and the process is running elevated. Assuming they're an administrator.
            return true;
        case TokenElevationType.TokenElevationTypeLimited:
            // TokenElevationTypeLimited - User has a split token, but the process is not running elevated. Assuming they're an administrator.
            return true;
        default:
            // Unknown token elevation type.
            return false;
     }
}
finally
{    
    if (tokenInformation != IntPtr.Zero) Marshal.FreeHGlobal(tokenInformation);
}
  • works great on Vista - thank you! – avs099 Jun 16 '13 at 12:54
  • 1
    This is the most complete answer, and addresses issues where the call to IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator) returns false because UAC is blocking. Confirmed to work properly on Windows 8. – David Chen Aug 31 '13 at 1:38
  • This is a great answer, but not to this question! – Harry Johnston Feb 12 '15 at 22:55
17

If you want to make sure your solution works in Vista UAC, and have .Net Framework 3.5 or better, you might want to use the System.DirectoryServices.AccountManagement namespace. Your code would look something like:

bool isAllowed = false;
using (PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Machine, null))
{
    UserPrincipal up = UserPrincipal.Current;
    GroupPrincipal gp = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(pc, "Administrators");
    if (up.IsMemberOf(gp))
        isAllowed = true;
}
3

Tried Erwin's code but it didn't compile.

Got it to work like this:

[DllImport("shell32.dll")] public static extern bool IsUserAnAdmin();
  • of course you need using System.Runtime.InteropServices; – Alex G. Feb 3 '13 at 18:34
  • This worked like a champ for me - anyone have an idea what the code inside the IsUserAnAdmin function actually looks like? – Goyuix Sep 5 '13 at 17:32
  • +1: This is the canonical way as requested by OP. – GOTO 0 Oct 22 '13 at 22:32
  • 5
    -1: The MSDN page for IsUserAnAdmin link states: "End of client support: Windows Vista". This function might be unavailble for future versions of Windows, so it definitely isn't the "canonical" way. – jeyk May 13 '14 at 4:23
  • Looks like "End of client support: Windows Vista" part has been removed from the article, though it is still hinting about possible [deprecation]. – daserge Feb 7 at 7:01
3

Using the .NET Framework 4.5, it seems to be easier to check if a user is in the administrators group:

WindowsPrincipal principal = WindowsPrincipal.Current;
bool canBeAdmin = principal.Claims.Any((c) => c.Value == "S-1-5-32-544");
  • Watch out - there is a big difference beween the claims list that is returned between WindowsPrincipal.Current.Claims and (new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())).Claims see my answer below – OzBob May 27 '15 at 3:47
2

Other answers leveraging the IsInRole method only return true if the user is running with an elevated token, as others have commented. Here is a potential alternative for checking just for local Administrators group membership in both a standard and elevated context:

bool isAdmin = false;
using (var user = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())
{
    var principal = new WindowsPrincipal(user);
    // Check for token claim with well-known Administrators group SID
    const string LOCAL_ADMININSTRATORS_GROUP_SID = "S-1-5-32-544";
    if (principal.Claims.SingleOrDefault(x => x.Value == LOCAL_ADMININSTRATORS_GROUP_SID) != null)
    {
        isAdmin = true;
    }
}

return isAdmin;
  • should be answer – Mahdi Dec 21 '16 at 8:35
1

Use can use WMI with something like this to find out if the account is an admin, and just about anything else you want to know about there account

using System;
using System.Management;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WMISample
{
    public class MyWMIQuery
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            try
            {
                ManagementObjectSearcher searcher = 
                    new ManagementObjectSearcher("root\\CIMV2", 
                    "SELECT * FROM Win32_UserAccount"); 

                foreach (ManagementObject queryObj in searcher.Get())
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("-----------------------------------");
                    Console.WriteLine("Win32_UserAccount instance");
                    Console.WriteLine("-----------------------------------");
                    Console.WriteLine("AccountType: {0}", queryObj["AccountType"]);
                    Console.WriteLine("FullName: {0}", queryObj["FullName"]);
                    Console.WriteLine("Name: {0}", queryObj["Name"]);
                }
            }
            catch (ManagementException e)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("An error occurred while querying for WMI data: " + e.Message);
            }
        }
    }
}

To make it easier to get started download WMI Creator

you can also use this it access active directory (LDAP) or anything else on you computer/network

  • On my quad core i7 this hung the machine for 7 seconds until the call returned. – TripleAntigen May 17 '16 at 6:50
0

What about:

using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

internal static class Useful {
    [DllImport("shell32.dll", EntryPoint = "IsUserAnAdmin")]
    public static extern bool IsUserAnAdministrator();
}
0

There are 4 possible Methods - I prefer:

(new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())).IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator);

Here is code to give you a list of all the relevant claim data for your current user's Identity.

NOTE: there is a big difference beween the claims list that is returned between WindowsPrincipal.Current.Claims and (new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())).Claims

Console.WriteLine("press the ENTER key to start listing user claims:");
Console.ReadLine();

Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
bool canBeAdmin = (new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())).IsInRole(WindowsBuiltInRole.Administrator);
Console.WriteLine("GetCurrent IsInRole: canBeAdmin:{0}", canBeAdmin);

Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
canBeAdmin = (new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())).Claims.Any((c) => c.Value == "S-1-5-32-544");
Console.WriteLine("GetCurrent Claim: canBeAdmin?:{0}", canBeAdmin);

Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
canBeAdmin = (new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())).IsInRole("Administrator");
Console.WriteLine("GetCurrent IsInRole \"Administrator\": canBeAdmin?:{0}", canBeAdmin);

Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
canBeAdmin = (new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())).IsInRole("Admin");
Console.WriteLine("GetCurrent IsInRole \"Admin\": canBeAdmin?:{0}", canBeAdmin);

Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
canBeAdmin = WindowsPrincipal.Current.IsInRole("Admin");
Console.WriteLine("Current IsInRole \"Admin\": canBeAdmin:{0}", canBeAdmin);


Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
canBeAdmin = WindowsPrincipal.Current.IsInRole("Administrator");
Console.WriteLine("Current IsInRole \"Administrator\": canBeAdmin:{0}", canBeAdmin);

Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
canBeAdmin = WindowsPrincipal.Current.Claims.Any((c) => c.Value == "S-1-5-32-544");
Console.WriteLine("Current Claim: canBeAdmin?:{0}", canBeAdmin);

Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("WindowsPrincipal Claims:");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");

var propertyCount = 0;
foreach (var claim in WindowsPrincipal.Current.Claims)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0}", propertyCount++);
    Console.WriteLine("{0}", claim.ToString());
    Console.WriteLine("Issuer:{0}", claim.Issuer);
    Console.WriteLine("Subject:{0}", claim.Subject);
    Console.WriteLine("Type:{0}", claim.Type);
    Console.WriteLine("Value:{0}", claim.Value);
    Console.WriteLine("ValueType:{0}", claim.ValueType);
}

Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("WindowsPrincipal Identities Claims");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");

propertyCount = 0;
foreach (var identity in WindowsPrincipal.Current.Identities)
{
    int subPropertyCount = 0;
    foreach (var claim in identity.Claims)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", propertyCount, subPropertyCount++);
        Console.WriteLine("{0}", claim.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("Issuer:{0}", claim.Issuer);
        Console.WriteLine("Subject:{0}", claim.Subject);
        Console.WriteLine("Type:{0}", claim.Type);
        Console.WriteLine("Value:{0}", claim.Value);
        Console.WriteLine("ValueType:{0}", claim.ValueType);
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
    propertyCount++;
}

Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");
Console.WriteLine("Principal Id Claims");
Console.WriteLine("---------------------");

var p = new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent());
foreach (var claim in (new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent())).Claims)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0}", propertyCount++);
    Console.WriteLine("{0}", claim.ToString());
    Console.WriteLine("Issuer:{0}", claim.Issuer);
    Console.WriteLine("Subject:{0}", claim.Subject);
    Console.WriteLine("Type:{0}", claim.Type);
    Console.WriteLine("Value:{0}", claim.Value);
    Console.WriteLine("ValueType:{0}", claim.ValueType);
}

Console.WriteLine("press the ENTER key to end");
Console.ReadLine();
  • This would probably be more useful if you indicated what each of these results actually means, and what the difference is between WindowsPrincipal and new WindowsPrincipal and why. – Harry Johnston May 27 '15 at 21:46
  • 1
    @HarryJohnston thank you for the feedback. I don't actually now 'why' (like you I have no access to Microsoft internals), I just found the 'what', which is evident from running the experiment. Good luck with yours. – OzBob May 29 '15 at 1:24

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.