37

I want to create a hash table that gets my Object as his key without converting it to String.

Some thing like this:

var object1 = new Object();
var object2 = new Object();

var myHash = new HashTable();

myHash.put(object1, "value1");
myHash.put(object2, "value2");

alert(myHash.get(object1), myHash.get(object2)); // I wish that it will print value1 value2

EDIT: See my answer for full solution

  • There are new answers! :D – Peter Mar 7 '14 at 0:30
  • 1
    Congrats @Peter – Ilya Gazman Mar 7 '14 at 8:02
  • 5
    In ES6, you can use WeakMap for this purpose. – gaspard Jun 7 '15 at 11:29
  • WeakMap – neaumusic Jul 20 '16 at 22:15

11 Answers 11

18

Here is a proposal:

function HashTable() {
    this.hashes = {};
}

HashTable.prototype = {
    constructor: HashTable,

    put: function( key, value ) {
        this.hashes[ JSON.stringify( key ) ] = value;
    },

    get: function( key ) {
        return this.hashes[ JSON.stringify( key ) ];
    }
};

The API is exactly as shown in your question.

You can't play with the reference in js however (so two empty objects will look like the same to the hashtable), because you have no way to get it. See this answer for more details: How to get javascript object references or reference count?

Jsfiddle demo: http://jsfiddle.net/HKz3e/

However, for the unique side of things, you could play with the original objects, like in this way:

function HashTable() {
    this.hashes = {},
    this.id = 0;
}

HashTable.prototype = {
    constructor: HashTable,

    put: function( obj, value ) {
        obj.id = this.id;
        this.hashes[ this.id ] = value;
        this.id++;
    },

    get: function( obj ) {
        return this.hashes[ obj.id ];
    }
};

Jsfiddle demo: http://jsfiddle.net/HKz3e/2/

This means that your objects need to have a property named id that you won't use elsewhere. If you want to have this property as non-enumerable, I suggest you take a look at defineProperty (it's not cross-browser however, even with ES5-Shim, it doesn't work in IE7).

It also means you are limited on the number of items you can store in this hashtable. Limited to 253, that is.

And now, the "it's not going to work anywhere" solution: use ES6 WeakMaps. They are done exactly for this purpose: having objects as keys. I suggest you read MDN for more information: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/WeakMap

It slightly differs from your API though (it's set and not put):

var myMap = new WeakMap(),
    object1 = {},
    object2 = {};

myMap.set( object1, 'value1' );
myMap.set( object2, 'value2' );

console.log( myMap.get( object1 ) ); // "value1"
console.log( myMap.get( object2 ) ); // "value2"

Jsfiddle demo with a weakmap shim: http://jsfiddle.net/Ralt/HKz3e/9/

However, weakmaps are implemented in FF and Chrome (only if you enable the "Experimental javascript features" flag in chrome however). There are shims available, like this one: https://gist.github.com/1269991. Use at your own risk.

You can also use Maps, they may more suit your needs, since you also need to store primitive values (strings) as keys. Doc, Shim.

  • 1
    This is a solution indeed, I am just wondering how heavy is that JSON.stringify – Ilya Gazman Jun 5 '12 at 7:44
  • @Babibu, it depends on the size of the object. The bigger it is, the longer it will take to stringify it. If storing objects in a simple array is overkill for you, then stringifying your thousands of objects will probably be too. – laurent Jun 5 '12 at 7:46
  • JSON.stringify is cheap. Really. This is not going to be the bottleneck of your application. – Florian Margaine Jun 5 '12 at 7:47
  • 21
    This is wrong. You cannot rely on the ordering of keys in JSON.stringify(). To different objects with the same keys and values are not guaranteed to return the same string with JSON.stringify() (even though they do "most of the time"). See javascript - Is there a deterministic equivalent of JSON.stringify? for a better (but not-trivial-JSON.stringify()) string for an object. – Peter V. Mørch Jun 28 '13 at 5:35
  • 3
    @FlorianMargaine I didn't read anywhere in that question that it should be deterministic on the same implementation. That seems to be the case, though. I did however read that MDN's stringify page says "Properties of non-array objects are not guaranteed to be stringified in any particular order. Do not rely on ordering of properties within the same object within the stringification." Even though it works today, there are no guarantees for tomorrow. – Peter V. Mørch Jul 1 '13 at 18:42
22

Here is a simple Map implementation that will work with any type of key, including object references, and it will not mutate the key in any way:

function Map() {
    var keys = [], values = [];

    return {
        put: function (key, value) {
            var index = keys.indexOf(key);
            if(index == -1) {
                keys.push(key);
                values.push(value);
            }
            else {
                values[index] = value;
            }
        },
        get: function (key) {
            return values[keys.indexOf(key)];
        }
    };
}

While this yields the same functionality as a hash table, it's not actually implemented using a hash function since it iterates over arrays and has a worst case performance of O(n). However, for the vast majority of sensible use cases this shouldn't be a problem at all. The indexOf function is implemented by the JavaScript engine and is highly optimized.

  • 1
    To future readers: Note that Map is no longer a good name for this since it conflicts with the built-in Map type. – Sasha Chedygov Nov 22 '17 at 23:30
11

I took @Florian Margaine's suggestion to higher level and came up with this:

function HashTable(){
    var hash = new Object();
    this.put = function(key, value){
        if(typeof key === "string"){
            hash[key] = value;
        }
        else{
            if(key._hashtableUniqueId == undefined){
                key._hashtableUniqueId = UniqueId.prototype.generateId();
            }
            hash[key._hashtableUniqueId] = value;
        }

    };

    this.get = function(key){
        if(typeof key === "string"){
            return hash[key];
        }
        if(key._hashtableUniqueId == undefined){
            return undefined;
        }
        return hash[key._hashtableUniqueId];
    };
}

function UniqueId(){

}

UniqueId.prototype._id = 0;
UniqueId.prototype.generateId = function(){
    return (++UniqueId.prototype._id).toString();
};

Usage

var map = new HashTable();
var object1 = new Object();
map.put(object1, "Cocakola");
alert(map.get(object1)); // Cocakola

//Overriding
map.put(object1, "Cocakola 2");
alert(map.get(object1)); // Cocakola 2

// String key is used as String     
map.put("myKey", "MyValue");
alert(map.get("myKey")); // MyValue
alert(map.get("my".concat("Key"))); // MyValue

// Invalid keys 
alert(map.get("unknownKey")); // undefined
alert(map.get(new Object())); // undefined
  • Glad you got it sorted out :) – Florian Margaine Jun 6 '12 at 6:51
  • 2
    This requires that you always keep a reference to the object you used as a key, when calling put(). If you are going to do that, why map the values in the first place; why not just keep references to the values instead? Have you considered what will happen if you have two objects that are equivalent, but not the same object (!==) ? They should hash to the same value, but the get() method will fail you for any valid key that is not the exact object used in put() since you only added the ._hashtableUniqueId property to one of them. – sethro Jan 17 '14 at 19:35
  • 7
    Failing for non-identical objects is exactly the point. – shanusmagnus Jun 20 '14 at 2:07
  • Nice solution!! I've improved this solution by adding _hashtableUniqueId to key using Object.defineProperty and configuring it as not enumerable, so it won't appear in, for example, json requests. Also UniqueID object is not necessary. You can look at my answer for details. – edrian Aug 31 '16 at 18:15
  • No @ShawnMoore it will be fine. you will get "101"._hashtableUniqueId equals to some random number – Ilya Gazman Oct 27 '16 at 3:48
2

Here is a proposal, combining @Florian's solution with @Laurent's.

function HashTable() {
    this.hashes = [];
}

HashTable.prototype = {
    constructor: HashTable,

    put: function( key, value ) {
        this.hashes.push({
            key: key,
            value: value
        });
    },

    get: function( key ) {
        for( var i = 0; i < this.hashes.length; i++ ){
            if(this.hashes[i].key == key){
                return this.hashes[i].value;
            }
        }
    }
};

It wont change your object in any way and it doesn't rely on JSON.stringify.

  • 5
    The problem with this, is it is not a "Hash" table; there is no hashing going on. You just created a misleading wrapper for an array. Also, because of your use of "==", you will get unexpected results when using mixed types as keys informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1997934&seqNum=5. – sethro Jan 17 '14 at 18:34
1

I know that I am a year late, but for all others who stumble upon this thread, I've written the ordered object stringify to JSON, that solves the above noted dilemma: http://stamat.wordpress.com/javascript-object-ordered-property-stringify/

Also I was playing with custom hash table implementations which is also related to the topic: http://stamat.wordpress.com/javascript-quickly-find-very-large-objects-in-a-large-array/

//SORT WITH STRINGIFICATION

var orderedStringify = function(o, fn) {
    var props = [];
    var res = '{';
    for(var i in o) {
        props.push(i);
    }
    props = props.sort(fn);

    for(var i = 0; i < props.length; i++) {
        var val = o[props[i]];
        var type = types[whatis(val)];
        if(type === 3) {
            val = orderedStringify(val, fn);
        } else if(type === 2) {
            val = arrayStringify(val, fn);
        } else if(type === 1) {
            val = '"'+val+'"';
        }

        if(type !== 4)
            res += '"'+props[i]+'":'+ val+',';
    }

    return res.substring(res, res.lastIndexOf(','))+'}';
};

//orderedStringify for array containing objects
var arrayStringify = function(a, fn) {
    var res = '[';
    for(var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        var val = a[i];
        var type = types[whatis(val)];
        if(type === 3) {
            val = orderedStringify(val, fn);
        } else if(type === 2) {
            val = arrayStringify(val);
        } else if(type === 1) {
            val = '"'+val+'"';
        }

        if(type !== 4)
            res += ''+ val+',';
    }

    return res.substring(res, res.lastIndexOf(','))+']';
}
0

Just use the strict equality operator when looking up the object: ===

var objects = [];
objects.push(object1);
objects.push(object2);

objects[0] === object1; // true
objects[1] === object1; // false

The implementation will depend on how you store the objects in the HashTable class.

  • This is not hashtable, this is bad practis of array list with efficiency of O(n). It's not what I am looking – Ilya Gazman Jun 5 '12 at 6:12
  • There is no built-in hash table in JavaScript so, if you don't want to convert the object to a string, you need to use an array and loop through it. How much data will your table store? – laurent Jun 5 '12 at 6:33
  • thousandths,I need to find a solution some how. Converting to string not promise me a unique key. – Ilya Gazman Jun 5 '12 at 6:55
0

Using JSON.stringify() is completely awkward to me, and gives the client no real control over how their keys are uniquely identified. The objects that are used as keys should have a hashing function, but my guess is that in most cases overriding the toString() method, so that they will return unique strings, will work fine:

var myMap = {};

var myKey = { toString: function(){ return '12345' }};
var myValue = 6;

// same as myMap['12345']
myMap[myKey] = myValue;

Obviously, toString() should do something meaningful with the object's properties to create a unique string. If you want to enforce that your keys are valid, you can create a wrapper and in the get() and put() methods, add a check like:

if(!key.hasOwnProperty('toString')){
   throw(new Error('keys must override toString()'));
}

But if you are going to go thru that much work, you may as well use something other than toString(); something that makes your intent more clear. So a very simple proposal would be:

function HashTable() {
    this.hashes = {};
}

HashTable.prototype = {
    constructor: HashTable,

    put: function( key, value ) {
        // check that the key is meaningful, 
        // also will cause an error if primitive type
        if( !key.hasOwnProperty( 'hashString' ) ){
           throw( new Error( 'keys must implement hashString()' ) );
        }
        // use .hashString() because it makes the intent of the code clear
        this.hashes[ key.hashString() ] = value;
    },

    get: function( key ) {
        // check that the key is meaningful, 
        // also will cause an error if primitive type
        if( !key.hasOwnProperty( 'hashString' ) ){
           throw( new Error( 'keys must implement hashString()' ) );
        }
        // use .hashString() because it make the intent of the code clear
        return this.hashes[ key.hashString()  ];
    }
};
0

Inspired by @florian, here's a way where the id doesn't need JSON.stringify:

'use strict';

module.exports = HashTable;

function HashTable () {
  this.index = [];
  this.table = [];
}

HashTable.prototype = {

  constructor: HashTable,

  set: function (id, key, value) {
    var index = this.index.indexOf(id);
    if (index === -1) {
      index = this.index.length;
      this.index.push(id);
      this.table[index] = {};
    }
    this.table[index][key] = value;
  },

  get: function (id, key) {
    var index = this.index.indexOf(id);
    if (index === -1) {
      return undefined;
    }
    return this.table[index][key];
  }

};
0

I took @Ilya_Gazman solution and improved it by setting '_hashtableUniqueId' as a not enumerable property (it won't appear in JSON requests neither will be listed in for loops). Also removed UniqueId object, since it is enough using only HastTable function closure. For usage details please see Ilya_Gazman post

function HashTable() {
   var hash = new Object();

   return {
       put: function (key, value) {
           if(!HashTable.uid){
               HashTable.uid = 0;
           }
           if (typeof key === "string") {
               hash[key] = value;
           } else {
               if (key._hashtableUniqueId === undefined) {
                   Object.defineProperty(key, '_hashtableUniqueId', {
                       enumerable: false,
                       value: HashTable.uid++
                   });
               }
               hash[key._hashtableUniqueId] = value;
           }
       },
       get: function (key) {
           if (typeof key === "string") {
               return hash[key];
           }
           if (key._hashtableUniqueId === undefined) {
               return undefined;
           }
           return hash[key._hashtableUniqueId];
       }
   };
}
  • What if I map one item in two different HashTable maps? You will get duplicated ids... To avoid this I used the UniqueId object. Good one with jsons. – Ilya Gazman Sep 1 '16 at 5:56
  • @Ilya_Gazman thanks for noticing that!, fixed the code above. Didn't have that problem in my AngularJS implementation because there was an extra closure in factory method. – edrian Sep 1 '16 at 14:49
0

The best solution is to use WeakMap when you can (i.e. when you target browsers supporting it)

Otherwise you can use the following workaround (Typescript written and collision safe):

// Run this in the beginning of your app (or put it into a file you just import)
(enableObjectID)();

const uniqueId: symbol = Symbol('The unique id of an object');

function enableObjectID(): void {
    if (typeof Object['id'] !== 'undefined') {
        return;
    }

    let id: number = 0;

    Object['id'] = (object: any) => {
        const hasUniqueId: boolean = !!object[uniqueId];
        if (!hasUniqueId) {
            object[uniqueId] = ++id;
        }

        return object[uniqueId];
    };
}

Then you can simply get a unique number for any object in your code (like if would have been for pointer address)

let objectA = {};
let objectB = {};
let dico = {};

dico[(<any>Object).id(objectA)] = "value1";

// or 

dico[Object['id'](objectA);] = "value1";

// If you are not using typescript you don't need the casting

dico[Object.id(objectA)] = "value1"
0

Based on Peters answer, but with proper class design (not abusing closures), so the values are debuggable. Renamed from Map to ObjectMap, because Map is a builtin function. Also added the exists method:

ObjectMap = function() {
    this.keys = [];
    this.values = [];
}

ObjectMap.prototype.set = function(key, value) {
    var index = this.keys.indexOf(key);
    if (index == -1) {
        this.keys.push(key);
        this.values.push(value);
    } else {
        this.values[index] = value;
    }
}

ObjectMap.prototype.get = function(key) {
    return this.values[ this.keys.indexOf(key) ];
}

ObjectMap.prototype.exists = function(key) {
    return this.keys.indexOf(key) != -1;
}

/*
    TestObject = function() {}

    testA = new TestObject()
    testB = new TestObject()

    om = new ObjectMap()
    om.set(testA, true)
    om.get(testB)
    om.exists(testB)
    om.exists(testA)
    om.exists(testB)
*/
  • I used a closure to enforce encapsulation—we are creating an abstraction. The underlying data structure should only be mutable using our explicit public interface. This reduces the likelihood of bugs/errors/misuse in application code. We can still debug the internals in the debugger, or add additional convenience methods such as hasKey() or size(). – Peter Oct 21 '18 at 1:23
  • @Peter it just obfuscates understanding by now allowing new developers to actually understand the internals via F12/devtools. You only think you do something good, but actually it prevents understanding and hence THAT leads to bugs. – lama12345 Oct 21 '18 at 1:30
  • The whole idea behind abstraction is that it allows us to reason about the problem we are trying to solve at a higher level. The Map defines a contract and allows us to offload a certain amount of mental load. Think of this like any other JS engine builtin. Software systems are all about building abstractions upon abstractions until we can express in terms of “what” we want instead of “how”. This really is the only thing that prevents large projects (with hundreds of contributors) from collapsing. – Peter Oct 21 '18 at 1:39
  • Oh really? I work with a large WebGL/PBR/Game engine on GitHub and it exposes everything for debugging purposes. And guess what, it's doing great, far from collapsing. Just don't merge shitty Pull Requests until they fixed the code... – lama12345 Oct 21 '18 at 1:52
  • Sorry, didn’t mean to get personal. You are right—things like core libraries, game engines, kernels, device drivers, etc. all make these kind of trade offs—and for good reason—to maximize performance. This is possible with a highly skilled and disciplined team. What I am talking about is risk mitigation, when you can. – Peter Oct 21 '18 at 2:05

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