61

I have some number of generic lists in my code, that have tens or hundreds elements. Sometimes I need to refill this lists with other objects, so question is: what will be faster, to call Clear() method or creating a new List<T>()?

  • 3
    @Jason: IMO StackOverflow experts is not exactly "strangers on the internet". If someone has already researched the question he will be able to answer easily. But you do have a good point that if you want to know for sure, you should calculate it yourself. – Meta-Knight Jun 5 '12 at 16:26
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    Jason, I believe, that there are some common theory, that I should to know, for any situation, not only for my case. – Mrimsh Jun 5 '12 at 16:26
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    @Mrimsh: I don't see how that changes my answer from: measure it yourself. – jason Jun 5 '12 at 16:28
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    @Mrimsh The problem is that the "common theory" depends on a lot of factors, many of which depend on your exact usage scenario. Without knowing a lot of other information, there's no way to say one version is better than the other, as they have different performance characteristics - and each can be better/faster/use less memory/etc in specific scenarios. – Reed Copsey Jun 5 '12 at 16:29
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    +1 because this question is asking for answers that allow people to make informed guesses on the expected results even before testing. – João Portela Aug 22 '12 at 11:20
58

what will be faster, to call Clear() method or creating a `new List()?

This is impossible to answer. It really depends on a lot of factors, including how long the collection has existed.

The best option here would be to:

  1. Profile the application, and see if this really matters. It likely won't make any perceptible difference, in which case, I'd use the method that makes the most sense in terms of how you think of this object.

  2. If it does matter, write both sets of code, and measure the difference in speed (if any).

From a practical perspective, calling Clear() will not actually reduce the memory (used by the List<T> itself), as it doesn't shrink the list's capacity, only eliminates the values contained within it. Creating a new List<T> will cause a new list to be allocated, which will in turn cause more allocations with growth.

This, however, does not mean that it will be slower - in many cases, reallocating will be faster as you're less likely to promote the large arrays into higher garbage collection generations, which in turn can keep the GC process much faster.

Without knowing your exact scenario and measuring in a profiler, there is no way to know which is better in your scenario.

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    +1 to "measure". As noted by @NominSim, Clear is potentially costly operation (O(n) due to clearing out each element, especially for large lists), so profiling for particular scenario is only valid option. – Alexei Levenkov Jun 5 '12 at 16:48
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    @Alexei Levenkov: regarding O(n) complexity of Array.Clear() - with simple value types due to better locality the factor can be small. And , yes + 1 to measure – alexm Jun 7 '12 at 14:41
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    +1 for explaining the differences between Clear() and new List<T> as far as GC and memory allocation goes. – Kyle Baran Sep 22 '13 at 21:39
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    The functional programmer in me is more comfortable with re-initializing the variable rather than mutating the reference, whereas the systems programmer in me is more comfortable with reusing the reference (not necessarily meaning one is more efficient). – nawfal May 4 '17 at 16:02
22

I've run this test:

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int defaultN = 1000;

    Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

    while (true)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Enter test elements number:");
        int n;
        if (!int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out n)) n = defaultN;
        else defaultN = n;

        Console.WriteLine($"Test with {n} elements");

        List<object> list = Enumerable.Repeat(new object(), n).ToList();
        sw.Start();
        Clear(list);
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Clear: {0} ms", sw.ElapsedTicks / 10000D);

        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

        List<object> list2 = Enumerable.Repeat(new object(), n).ToList();
        sw.Restart();
        Reinitialize(list2);
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Reinitialize: {0} ms", sw.ElapsedTicks / 10000D);

        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

        List<object> list3 = Enumerable.Repeat(new object(), n).ToList();
        sw.Restart();
        ReinitializeAndCollect(list3);
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("ReinitializeAndCollect: {0} ms", sw.ElapsedTicks / 10000D);

        Console.WriteLine("===");
    }
}
private static List<object> Clear(List<object> list)
{
    list.Clear();
    return list;
}
private static List<object> Reinitialize(List<object> list) => new List<object>();
private static List<object> ReinitializeAndCollect(List<object> list)
{
    list = new List<object>();

    GC.Collect();
    GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

    return list;
}

My conclusion based on a results of my ordinary core i3 processor:

In case of thousands of elements - it is better to clear list. It is fast and memory efficient.

If collection has more than 100 000 elements - reinitializing becomes more attractive. If after profiling you think that there is a bottleneck here, use it. Re-initialization will be very fast, but as third method test shows, future garbage collecting will be about as slow as just clearing the list.

So short answer is: if you didn't profiled your application, use Clear. Reusing objects is good. If you did - you already know what to do.

8

This is going to depend on a lot of factors, and in the long run, it probably will not matter (enough to count) in your program.

From the msdn docs .Clear() is a O(n) operation.

Initializing a new instance will have its own overhead as well as (if you keep the collection the same length, a O(n) operation: i.e. n Add() calls).

Really the only way to test this is to set up some stopwatches in your program and see what the effect is if you really think it is worth it. In all likelihood; it's not worth it.

My thoughts would be that if you've already created a collection, Clear() it, that's why there is a Clear() method in the first place.

  • +1. I'd say this is very important difference as Clear have to empty each element unlike Add. – Alexei Levenkov Jun 5 '12 at 16:45
4

While this may be frustrating, the answer really is that it shouldn't matter. The time difference between the two is going to be so small that it probably won't make any difference to your application. Do what leads to cleaner, more understandable code, and try not to program for micro-optimizations.

  • +1 Right, otherwise the question smells of Premature Optimization. – RobertMS Jun 5 '12 at 16:26
  • This may in fact be very significant - but you're most likely correct. This should only be considered if measurement shows its a problem - but I think it's unfair to assume that it doesn't/shouldn't matter... – Reed Copsey Jun 5 '12 at 16:32
  • @ReedCopsey of course- in the extremely unlikely event that a profiler shows a problem in clearing (or allocating a new) collection, then it is worth looking into. My point was that based on years of software development experience, the likelihood of the time difference between these two operations being a major factor in application performance is basically nil, while the likelihood of using one where the other is expected having a negative effect on code correctness of is much more pronounced. – Chris Shain Jun 5 '12 at 16:37
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    @ChrisShain Yes - I agree, but I have actually had this be a measured, significant hotspot in my code. Using Clear() does have the potential for real problems, if it's used within some form of loop and causing your collection to be promoted to Gen1 or Gen2. While I completely agree that this is unlikely to be a problem in most applications, I still find it unfair to just assume that it doesn't matter, without knowing that the original poster hasn't measured. – Reed Copsey Jun 5 '12 at 16:42
4

Maybe I'm doing something fundamentally wrong here but while developing an ASP.NET application in C# I'm encountering quite a difference when using Clear() vs. new. I'm creating a statistics page with charts, which have data series. For each chart I have a section where I do this:

chart = new ChartistChart() { Title = "My fancy chart" };
series = new List<ChartistMetaValue>();
*some code for getting the statistics*
chart.Series.Add(series);
chartistLineCharts.Add(chart);

then another chart follows.

chart = new ChartistChart() { Title = "My second fancy chart" };
series = new List<ChartistMetaValue>();
*some code for getting the statistics*
chart.Series.Add(series);
chartistLineCharts.Add(chart);

This works just fine with series being reallocated with new, but when I do

series.Clear();

instead I actually clear the entry inside chart.Series and chartistLineCharts so the statistics page ends up retrieving only the last chart's series. I assume there is some link, like a memory pointer, here and this is a different issue than what is originally discussed, but this is at least a reason to pick new over Clear(). Perhaps there is a way to avoid it though.

  • Good point. .Clear is mutating the original reference, it can have implications outside of the variable you're currently interested in. – nawfal May 4 '17 at 15:49
3

Clear() will remove all elements, and maintain the existing capacity, whereas creating a new List will need at least one allocation from the managed heap (possibly more as items are added if the initial capacity is small).

  • If you have a large number of items, and the number of items is roughly the same on each iteration, then using Clear is potentially slightly faster.

  • If you have an exceptionally large number of items on one iteration, then a much smaller number on subsequent iterations, then using Clear is potentially more costly, because you'll be keeping in memory a list with an unnecessarily large capacity.

Of course, in many (most?) scenarios the difference will be negligible.

3

I've made several tests for myself. Results (speed) are:

  • for small lists - eg 3 items, its faster to create new lists, but the difference is not big
  • for 10 or more items on average it is better to clear lists. For value types much better (eg 3-4 times), for value times like 20% better.

But in the end, it's better to profile application and find bottlenecks for whole application.

1

If your objects are value types I'd use Clear() to reduce memory future allocations. Otherwise both approaches are almost identical.

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    -1. This is not true - Clear will not decrease size of the backing array so no memory usage reduction for value types at all. Or you may mean something else... – Alexei Levenkov Jun 5 '12 at 16:50
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    @Alexei Levenkov It will reduce future memory allocations. OP intention was to re-populate it right away. – alexm Jun 7 '12 at 14:32

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