12

I am having an issue with my cipher class. At times it is very fast. Sometimes however it is slow. the code Im using is as follows

class Cipher {
    private $securekey, $iv;
    function __construct() {
        $this->securekey = hash('sha256','51(^8k"12cJ[6&cvo3H/!2s02Uh46vuT4l7sc7a@cZ27Q',TRUE);
        $this->iv = mcrypt_create_iv(32);
    }
    function encrypt($input) {
        return base64_encode(mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, $this->securekey, $input, MCRYPT_MODE_ECB));
    }
    function decrypt($input) {
        return trim(mcrypt_decrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, $this->securekey, base64_decode($input), MCRYPT_MODE_ECB));
    }
    function storeIV() {
        return $this->iv;
    }
}

Are there any suggestions on why this may be slow at times and how I could fix this?

3
  • What is server load like when it runs fast? When it runs slow? What kinds of times have you recorded?
    – WWW
    Jun 6, 2012 at 15:22
  • Server loads have been identical between fast/slow when it is quick it is loading in about .5 seconds when it is slow, I can wait for about 2 minutes
    – bretterer
    Jun 6, 2012 at 15:24
  • Just a security note: I believe you are using your Cipher class to encrypt multiple plaintext. Normally an iv should not be reused, so it is better I think to generate the IV in the encrypt method rather in the constructor. See stackoverflow.com/questions/11821195/… to see how to store and restore it. Also, note that mcrypt_create_iv can be very slow if the system has not enough entropy. Personally I use openssl_random_pseudo_bytes. Also, I think there is the iv argument missing in your mcrypt_encrypt/decrypt function calls. Jan 28, 2015 at 9:47

3 Answers 3

27

Have you tried the three different second arguments for mcrypt_create_iv(): MCRYPT_RAND (system random number generator), MCRYPT_DEV_RANDOM (read data from /dev/random) and MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM (read data from /dev/urandom)? Do they offer different consistent speeds? I wonder if it's because /dev/random (the default random source) is running out of collected entropy; the function will block when it does.

4
  • If it's the latter, is there a solution for this or should we just change to MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM ?
    – Dan
    Feb 4, 2014 at 13:14
  • 2
    @Silver89: just change to MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM. According to Bruce Schneier, neither /dev/random nor /dev/urandom are very robust ( schneier.com/blog/archives/2013/10/insecurities_in.html ), so you might as well use the one that works.
    – WWW
    Feb 4, 2014 at 15:06
  • I used MCRYPT_RAND which worked. MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM also worked. Feb 25, 2014 at 1:48
  • @Crontab At this time /dev/urandom and /dev/random are robust enough for practical security in applications. Equivocation is not advisable as it may mislead. The Schneirer link is referring to a research paper which suggests strengthening PRNGs according to a new level of robustness which would be secure against sophisticated theoretical attacks. It's proactive research, beyond state of the art at this time.
    – Mark Fox
    Nov 3, 2014 at 1:24
6

Use MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM when creating the IV. It's less secure, but won't block if entropy gets too low. MCRYPT_DEV_RANDOM will wait until enough entropy is acquired to be secure.

// PHP < 5.6
$this->iv = mcrypt_create_iv(32, MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM);

But in more updated versions of PHP, the default has changed and your original code should work.

// PHP >= 5.6
$this->iv = mcrypt_create_iv(32);   // MCRYPT_DEV_URANDOM implied

PHP docs: mcrypt_create_iv (note on $source parameter):

Note that the default value of this parameter was MCRYPT_DEV_RANDOM prior to PHP 5.6.0.

And from Ubuntu Manual:

If you are unsure about whether you should use /dev/random or /dev/urandom, then probably you want to use the latter. As a general rule, /dev/urandom should be used for everything except long-lived GPG/SSL/SSH keys.

1
  • 1
    This sentiment is echoed and expanded on in the Ubuntu manual — and I quote: "If you are unsure about whether you should use /dev/random or /dev/urandom, then probably you want to use the latter. As a general rule, /dev/urandom should be used for everything except long-lived GPG/SSL/SSH keys."
    – Mark Fox
    Nov 3, 2014 at 1:45
-1
class Cipher {
    private $securekey, $iv;
    function __construct() {
        $this->securekey = hash('sha256','51(^8k"12cJ[6&cvo3H/!2s02Uh46vuT4l7sc7a@cZ27Q',TRUE);
        $this->iv = isset($_SESSION['sifrem'])?$_SESSION['sifrem']:mcrypt_create_iv(34);
        $_SESSION['sifrem']=$this->iv;
    }
    function encrypt($input) {
        return base64_encode(mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, $this->securekey, $input, MCRYPT_MODE_ECB));
    }
    function decrypt($input) {
        return trim(mcrypt_decrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256, $this->securekey, base64_decode($input), MCRYPT_MODE_ECB));
    }
    function storeIV() {
        return $this->iv;
    }
}
1
  • 1
    It's never a good idea to reuse an IV, it will have a negative impact on how secure it is.
    – Sam
    Jun 7, 2014 at 9:57

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