19

First, the fiddle.

$('#enableButtonB').click(function (e) {
   if($(e.target).is(':checked'))
   {
       $('#myButtonB').removeProp('disabled');
       alert('Enable Button B');
   }
   else
   {
       $('#myButtonB').prop('disabled', true); 
       alert('Disable Button B');
   }
});

I'm trying to use jQuery's .prop() and removeProp() methods to enable and disable a button based on some criteria. It seems to work fine until removeProp() is called on the element. After that any subsequent calls to prop() fail to disable to button.

What's the proper way to enable and disable an element repeatedly?

  • 8
    $('element').prop('disabled', true/false) where you use true if you want it to be disabled, or false if you want it enabled. – Ohgodwhy Jun 6 '12 at 18:18
  • Your fiddle works fine for me on FF12. – js1568 Jun 6 '12 at 18:19
  • Why don't you use .attr() and .removeAttr() instead of .prop() and .removeProp() – Ranganadh Paramkusam Jun 6 '12 at 18:22
  • 7
    The jQuery docs are great api.jquery.com/removeProp says : "Note: Do not use this method to remove native properties such as checked, disabled, or selected. This will remove the property completely and, once removed, cannot be added again to element. Use .prop() to set these properties to false instead." – iambriansreed Jun 6 '12 at 18:22
  • @iambriansreed Very good to know. Thanks for the heads up. I'll definitely be more careful with removeProp() in the future. – Jason Towne Jun 6 '12 at 18:25
25

Instead of

.removeProp('disabled')

use

.prop('disabled',false)

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/kqnZz/6/

| improve this answer | |
  • @iambriansreed It's an improper example anyway. – Blazemonger Jun 6 '12 at 18:23
  • Those were intentionally left in, @iambriansreed. But if you insist: jsfiddle.net/kqnZz/8 – Blazemonger Jun 6 '12 at 18:40
  • 1
    I'm randomly coming across this question/answer looking for something else (and I see that it is somewhat old), but an explanation as to why this change is required would be helpful. From jQuery's documentation (api.jquery.com/removeProp), "Note: Do not use this method to remove native properties such as checked, disabled, or selected. This will remove the property completely and, once removed, cannot be added again to element. Use .prop() to set these properties to false instead." – MandM Apr 15 '15 at 16:53
17

First, http://jsfiddle.net/iambriansreed/KxGVa/

The jQuery docs are great. removeProp says:

Note: Do not use this method to remove native properties such as checked, disabled, or selected. This will remove the property completely and, once removed, cannot be added again to element. Use .prop() to set these properties to false instead.

Change:

.removeProp('disabled')

...to...

.prop('disabled', false)

...and...

.prop('disabled', 'disabled')

...to...

.prop('disabled', true)
| improve this answer | |
4

Try if this short function solves your needs:

$("#enableButtonB").click(function(){
  $("#myButtonB").prop('disabled', function (_, val) { return ! val; });
});

Creds to user Explosion Pills for that sweet function :)

| improve this answer | |
1

This line will act as toggle disabled function:

$('#myButtonB').prop('disabled', !$('#myButtonB').prop('disabled'));

If you use it inside a jquery function you can use it like:

$('#enableButtonB').on('click', function() {
     $('#myButtonB').prop('disabled', !$('#myButtonB').prop('disabled'));
});
| improve this answer | |

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