28

For example could I make it type something like

"Hello"
"This"
"Is"
"A"
"Test"

With 1 second intervals in-between each new line?

Thanks,

1
  • I've tried nothing, I'm new to C So I don't know all commands I can use...Was just wondering if there was a command to wait a certain time before doing something else Jun 6, 2012 at 22:03

5 Answers 5

58

Well the sleep() function does it, there are several ways to use it;

On linux:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h> // notice this! you need it!

int main(){
    printf("Hello,");
    sleep(5); // format is sleep(x); where x is # of seconds.
    printf("World");
    return 0;
}

And on windows you can use either dos.h or windows.h like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <windows.h> // notice this! you need it! (windows)

int main(){
    printf("Hello,");
    Sleep(5); // format is Sleep(x); where x is # of milliseconds.
    printf("World");
    return 0;
}

or you can use dos.h for linux style sleep like so:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <dos.h> // notice this! you need it! (windows)

int main(){
    printf("Hello,");
    sleep(5); // format is sleep(x); where x is # of seconds.
    printf("World");
    return 0;
}

And that is how you sleep in C on both windows and linux! For windows both methods should work. Just change the argument for # of seconds to what you need, and insert wherever you need a pause, like after the printf as I did. Also, Note: when using windows.h, please remember the capital S in sleep, and also thats its milliseconds! (Thanks to Chris for pointing that out)

3
  • 3
    I'd also like to note to other people who may stumble upon this thread, REMEMBER TO CAPITALIZE Sleep();!!!! Jun 6, 2012 at 22:17
  • 2
    I also needed to do fflush(stdout) before sleep, because the first printf was being printed after function call
    – mr.loop
    Oct 4, 2021 at 7:29
  • Sleep() in Windows is in MILLISECONDS, not seconds.
    – skelliam
    Oct 11, 2022 at 20:17
5

something not as elegant as sleep(), but uses the standard library:

/* data declaration */
time_t start, end;

/* ... */

/* wait 2.5 seconds */
time(&start);
do time(&end); while(difftime(end, start) <= 2.5);

I'll leave for you the finding out the right header (#include) for time_t, time() and difftime(), and what they mean. It's part of the fun. :-)

2
  • 3
    Your suggestion also needlessly wastes processor cycles. sleep() or some variant is the right answer.
    – pb2q
    Jun 6, 2012 at 22:35
  • 1
    Oh, you are right. Is not elegant (as I stated already). It's just portable. But wasting processor cycles is not just a side effect. Actually is the main idea behind the code, is what makes it work, clumsily as you may say. :-)
    – CST
    Jun 6, 2012 at 22:43
2

You can look at sleep() which suspends the thread for the specified seconds.

0
-2

The most easiest way is to give a loop. Be it while or for loop

int main()
{
while(i<100000) //delay
{
 i++;     
 }
 }
2
  • 2
    This gives little control over the delay length. In fact any decent optimising compiler will just remove the loop, as having no nett effect. Jun 24, 2022 at 17:18
  • One can also use conditional while loop for delay, In case the code is waiting for any event to happen and require delay. Then simply use While(!event); it will become false only when event come, otherwise will wait indefinitely. Jul 6, 2022 at 4:31
-9

Works on all OS

int main()
{
char* sent[5] ={"Hello ", "this ", "is ", "a ", "test."};
int i =0;
while( i < 5 )
{
printf("%s", sent[i] );
int c =0, i++;
while( c++ < 1000000 ); // you can use sleep but for this you dont need #import
} 
return 0;
}
9
  • 11
    This is a very bad practice. Your loop just needlessly wastes processor cycles. Why should you be averse to using #import for a standard sleep function? Worst case you'll need to #ifdef to cover multiple platforms.
    – pb2q
    Jun 6, 2012 at 22:33
  • Its just an Option if you sayits bad practice so i spend my ten years for nothing
    – Eveler
    Jun 6, 2012 at 22:36
  • 6
    If you don't understand why this is a bad idea then you should learn why now.
    – pb2q
    Jun 6, 2012 at 22:37
  • 4
    Late to the downvote party, but this solution also presumes that one million cycles of the while loop take one second. So while this solution will work on any operating system with a C compiler (not all OS), it is not portable across architectures. sleep() and difftime() both take CLOCKS_PER_SEC into account. Sep 8, 2017 at 19:08
  • 4
    Also, it's pretty weird that you're averse to including sys/wait.h, unistd.h, time.h or string.h for standard library functions, but you're cool with including stdio.h for printf(...). Sep 8, 2017 at 19:10

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