73

I have a command (cmd1) that greps through a log file to filter out a set of numbers. The numbers are in random order, so I use sort -gr to get a reverse sorted list of numbers. There may be duplicates within this sorted list. I need to find the count for each unique number in that list.

For e.g. if the output of cmd1 is:

100 
100 
100 
99 
99 
26 
25 
24 
24

I need another command that I can pipe the above output to, so that, I get:

100     3
99      2
26      1
25      1
24      2
88

how about;

$ echo "100 100 100 99 99 26 25 24 24" \
    | tr " " "\n" \
    | sort \
    | uniq -c \
    | sort -k2nr \
    | awk '{printf("%s\t%s\n",$2,$1)}END{print}'

The result is :

100 3
99  2
26  1
25  1
24  2
  • 1
    I ran this and it produced an extra print statement of $1,$2 at the end: 100 3 99 2 26 1 25 1 24 2 2 24 – Mittenchops Mar 25 '13 at 16:46
  • 3
    The following adds a new line between the results and removes the extra line at the end: echo "100 100 100 99 99 26 25 24 24" | tr " " "\n" | sort | uniq -c | sort -k2nr | awk '{printf("%s\t%s\n",$2,$1)}END{print}' | head -n -1 so you get: 100 3 99 2 26 1 25 1 24 2 – Woody May 27 '16 at 16:24
  • Note about syntax, you can end a line with a pipe instead of using a backslash. – wjandrea Jul 14 at 3:03
47

uniq -c works for GNU uniq 8.23 at least, and does exactly what you want (assuming sorted input).

  • 2
    in case if the input is not sorted, then just add sort command: sort file_name | uniq -c – Mikhail Geyer Mar 10 '17 at 10:24
  • Awesome. Works on Mac OS X as well! Tested on Mojave 10.14.6. – bappak Sep 5 at 22:54
10

if order is not important

# echo "100 100 100 99 99 26 25 24 24" | awk '{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)a[$i]++}END{for(o in a) printf "%s %s ",o,a[o]}'
26 1 100 3 99 2 24 2 25 1
  • +1 for doing this with 3 less pipes. It would be awesome if you could elaborate on how this works b/c it confused me. ;-) Thanks. – SaxDaddy Oct 27 '14 at 2:47
9

Numerically sort the numbers in reverse, then count the duplicates, then swap the left and the right words. Align into columns.

printf '%d\n' 100 99 26 25 100 24 100 24 99 \
   | sort -nr | uniq -c | awk '{printf "%-8s%s\n", $2, $1}'
100     3
99      2
26      1
25      1
24      2
2

In Bash, we can use an associative array to count instances of each input value. Assuming we have the command $cmd1, e.g.

#!/bin/bash

cmd1='printf %d\n 100 99 26 25 100 24 100 24 99'

Then we can count values in the array variable a using the ++ mathematical operator on the relevant array entries:

while read i
do
    ((++a["$i"]))
done < <($cmd1)

We can print the resulting values:

for i in "${!a[@]}"
do
    echo "$i ${a[$i]}"
done

If the order of output is important, we might need an external sort of the keys:

for i in $(printf '%s\n' "${!a[@]}" | sort -nr)
do
    echo "$i ${a[$i]}"
done

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.