16

I've got a link that I want to make look like a button with round corners and a gradient fill. It works fine in Chrome, but not in IE.

I've found that if I set display: inline-block, it shows the gradient, but removes the rounded corners. Does anybody know how to get around this issue in IE?

Demo in JSFiddle

HTML:

<a href="" class="button-gold-med">Hello World</a>​

CSS:

a {    
    color: white;
    padding: 8px;

    background: #7db9e8;
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, from(#7db9e8), to(#1e5799));
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #7db9e8, #1e5799);
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #7db9e8, #1e5799);
    background: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #7db9e8, #1e5799);
    background: -o-linear-gradient(top, #7db9e8, #1e5799);
    background: linear-gradient(top, #7db9e8, #1e5799);
    filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr='#7db9e8', endColorstr='#1e5799',GradientType=0);
    zoom: 1;

    -moz-border-radius: 5px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 5px;
    border-radius: 5px;

    -moz-background-clip: padding;
    -webkit-background-clip: padding-box;
    background-clip: padding-box;
}
2
  • What version of IE do you want it to work in? Works fine as-is in IE10 Consumer Preview.
    – uınbɐɥs
    Commented Jun 7, 2012 at 1:51
  • IE 8 and 9. I'm OK if IE 7 and before don't look exactly the same.
    – Brian
    Commented Jun 7, 2012 at 2:53

3 Answers 3

14

I know this question is quite old, however since it is unaswered and if this can help people, here is my solution to get a linear Gradient working in all mayor Browsers:

/* IE10 Consumer Preview */ 
background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #FFFFFF 0%, #BDBDBD 100%);

/* Mozilla Firefox */ 
background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #FFFFFF 0%, #BDBDBD 100%);

/* Opera */ 
background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top, #FFFFFF 0%, #BDBDBD 100%);

/* Webkit (Safari/Chrome 10) */ 
background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, color-stop(0,     #FFFFFF), color-stop(1, #BDBDBD));

/* Webkit (Chrome 11+) */ 
background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #FFFFFF 0%, #BDBDBD 100%);

/* W3C Markup, IE10 Release Preview */ 
background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, #FFFFFF 0%, #BDBDBD 100%);

There is also an onlie tool to create this CSS gradients, chek it here:

http://ie.microsoft.com/Testdrive/Graphics/CSSGradientBackgroundMaker/Default.html

1
  • 1
    I know this answer is quite old but I just want to say thanks.
    – hdotluna
    Commented Apr 7, 2017 at 13:55
13

You need to use the Microsoft filter:

 filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Gradient(startColorstr='#7db9e8', endColorstr='#1e5799');

Use that as a fallback for IE--it works in most versions.

See the specifications:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms532997%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

5
  • I was just about to say that. Isn't it supposed to be Gradient instead of gradient? e.g. filter:progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Gradient? (Gradient Filter)
    – uınbɐɥs
    Commented Jun 7, 2012 at 1:54
  • I'm not sure I thought it worked both ways, but according to the specs you technically are right... thanks!
    – zdebruine
    Commented Jun 7, 2012 at 1:58
  • That looks like exactly what I have in my CSS. Is there something I'm missing? I copied your code into my JS Fiddle project and it still doesn't work.
    – Brian
    Commented Jun 7, 2012 at 2:52
  • Hm? I futzed with your JS Fiddle. It seems to work when I change the <a> to a <div>. Just do that and it works. But I have absolutely no idea why it isn't working for <a>. You can take a look at the specifications, but I did that as well and it doesn't seem to offer any obvious solution: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms532997(v=vs.85).aspx
    – zdebruine
    Commented Jun 7, 2012 at 17:38
  • I haven't tried it myself, but would display: block; or display: inline-block; work for <a>?
    – uınbɐɥs
    Commented Jun 7, 2012 at 21:31
2

Instead of using a filter, you can always fallback with an image:

a {
    color: white;
    padding: 8px;

    background: #7db9e8;
    background: transparent url('gradient.png') 0 0 repeat;
    background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, from(#7db9e8), to(#1e5799));
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #7db9e8, #1e5799);
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #7db9e8, #1e5799);
    background: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #7db9e8, #1e5799);
    background: -o-linear-gradient(top, #7db9e8, #1e5799);
    background: linear-gradient(top, #7db9e8, #1e5799);

    -moz-border-radius: 5px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 5px;
    border-radius: 5px;

    -moz-background-clip: padding;
    -webkit-background-clip: padding-box;
    background-clip: padding-box;
}

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