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I know this question has been asked over and over again, but I still haven't found the perfect answer for my liking, so here it goes again...

I've been reading lots and lots polarizing comments about CI's xss_filter. Basically majority says that it's bad. Can someone elaborate how it's bad, or at least give 1 most probable scenario where it can be exploited? I've looked at the security class in CI 2.1 and I think it's pretty good as it doesn't allow malicious strings like document.cookie, document.write, etc.

If the site has basically non-html presentation, is it safe to use global xss_filter (or if it's REALLY affecting performance that much, use it on per form post basis) before inserting to database ? I've been reading about pros and cons about whether to escape on input/output with majority says that we should escape on output only. But then again, why allow strings like <a href="javascript:stealCookie()">Click Me</a> to be saved in the database at all?

The one thing I don't like is javascript: and such will be converted to [removed]. Can I extend the CI's security core $_never_allowed_str arrays so that the never allowed strings return empty rather than [removed].

The best reasonable wrongdoing example of this I've read is if a user has password of javascript:123 it will be cleaned into [removed]123 which means string like this document.write123 will also pass as the user's password. Then again, what is the odds of that to happen and even if it happens, I can't think of any real harm that can do to the site.

Thanks

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Basically XSS is an OUTPUT problem - but Codeigniter deals with it as an INPUT problem.

Can someone elaborate how it's bad...

The problem is xss_clean alters your INPUT - meaning in some scenarios (like the password issue you have described) the input is not what is expected.

...or at least give 1 most probable scenario where it can be exploited?

It only looks for certain key words, such as "javascript". There are other script actions which xss_clean does not detect, plus it wont protect you against any "new" attacks.

The one thing I don't like is javascript: and such will be converted to [removed]. Can I extend the CI's security core $_never_allowed_str arrays so that the never allowed strings return empty rather than [removed]

You could do this - but your just putting a bandaid on a poor solution.

I've been reading about pros and cons about whether to escape on input/output with majority says that we should escape on output only.

This is the correct answer - escape ALL your output, and you have true XSS protection, without altering the input.

OWASP explains more on XSS here

See a good Codeigniter forum thread on XSS

Personally my approach to XSS protection in Codeigniter is I do not do ANY XSS cleaning on the inputs. I run a hook on the _output - which cleans all my “view_data” (which is the variable I use to send data to the views).

I can toggle if I dont want the XSS Clean to run by inserting a “$view_data[‘clean_output’] = false” in my controller, which the hook checks:

if (( ! isset($this->CI->view_data['clean_output'])) || ($this->CI->view_data['clean_output']))
   {
    // Apply to all in the list
    $this->CI->view_data = array_map("htmlspecialchars", $this->CI->view_data);
   }  

This gives me automatic and full XSS protection on my whole site -with just a couple of lines of code and no performance hit.

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  • escaping all outputs won't allow user to use even a strong tag or even a br isn't it? Like I said, I'm planning to use xss_clean on per post basis, not a global filter.
    – Henson
    Jun 7 '12 at 6:28
  • one more, you're using htmlspecialchars to escape all the HTML tags right? So what if you need to display data with the HTML tags? You toggle the clean output to false, then naughty users who notice that some the portion of the site is tag-allowed then input links or strong tags with javascript event. So isn't it much safer to sanitize the inputs first?
    – Henson
    Jun 7 '12 at 6:48
  • 1
    Its up to you - you cant have it both ways - i.e. if you allow HTML code to be output by your users, then thats a massive security hole, and someone will exploit it at some point with something "bad". You can alter my code to be per variable, rather than all output if you want.
    – Laurence
    Jun 7 '12 at 7:28
  • If you do want to output HTML without handing over control of your website to the users (and any "embed codes" they find from random places on the web), you desperately need something like htmlpurifier.org
    – sourcejedi
    Aug 12 '12 at 15:25
  • "I run a hook on the _output - which cleans all my “view_data” (which is the variable I use to send data to the views)." -- that only works if you never output this data inside different contexts: CSS or javascript, e.g. script tags, script files, event handler attributes. Maybe some projects work with that sort of strict separation - but the code I've been looking at doesn't, so I don't think this is a good idea as general-purpose advice. When people say to escape your output - that's literally what they mean, escape at the point of output.
    – sourcejedi
    Aug 12 '12 at 15:37

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