43

In PowerShell, how can I test if a variable holds a numeric value?

Currently, I'm trying to do it like this, but it always seems to return false.

add-type -Language CSharpVersion3 @'
    public class Helpers {
        public static bool IsNumeric(object o) {
            return o is byte  || o is short  || o is int  || o is long
                || o is sbyte || o is ushort || o is uint || o is ulong
                || o is float || o is double || o is decimal
                ;
        }
    }
'@

filter isNumeric($InputObject) {
    [Helpers]::IsNumeric($InputObject)
}

PS> 1 | isNumeric
False

15 Answers 15

59

You can check whether the variable is a number like this: $val -is [int]

This will work for numeric values, but not if the number is wrapped in quotes:

1 -is [int]
True
"1" -is [int]
False
3
  • @Christian you're right. I was only thinking about the case in the question. Commented Jun 7, 2012 at 8:29
  • 4
    @CB that's because 1.5 is not an integer, it is a double... 1.5 -is [double] evaluates to true Commented Oct 4, 2017 at 18:54
  • 1
    Also fails if the value is cast as a Int64.
    – Jim
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 18:33
44

If you are testing a string for a numeric value then you can use the a regular expression and the -match comparison. Otherwise Christian's answer is a good solution for type checking.

function Is-Numeric ($Value) {
    return $Value -match "^[\d\.]+$"
}

Is-Numeric 1.23
True
Is-Numeric 123
True
Is-Numeric ""
False
Is-Numeric "asdf123"
False
5
  • 1
    I'm not testing a string, I'm testing a type. But ignoring that for the moment, how about negative values? And what about exponential values (3.24643e4)? Yeah, I know, I'm splitting hairs! Commented Jun 8, 2012 at 14:42
  • 2
    I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader. :) I just wanted to add this for people who may stumble on the question looking for checking numeric string values. Commented Jun 8, 2012 at 15:10
  • 1
    Well done @silent__thought, I was looking for exactly this.
    – Tim Meers
    Commented Aug 10, 2016 at 18:17
  • "1.2.3" -match "^[\d\.]+$" --> True. "^(\d+|\.\d+|\d+\.\d+)$" would allow only one decimal separator. Returns true for "1", ".1", "1.1" and false for "1.", "1.1.1", "".
    – jumxozizi
    Commented Jul 6, 2018 at 12:51
  • this regex is incorrect, Is-Numeric ................. would be true Commented Jan 18, 2023 at 0:01
35

You can do something like :

$testvar -match '^[0-9]+$'

or

$testvar -match '^\d+$'

Returns True if $testvar is a number.

2
  • This will only return true for positive integers
    – Marc
    Commented Jul 1, 2022 at 14:13
  • Check it '00:03:34,00 --> 00:03:36,80' -match '[0-9]+$' 5 -match '[0-9]+$'
    – Garric
    Commented Jan 23 at 21:45
31

Modify your filter like this:

filter isNumeric {
    [Helpers]::IsNumeric($_)
}

function uses the $input variable to contain pipeline information whereas the filter uses the special variable $_ that contains the current pipeline object.

Edit:

For a powershell syntax way you can use just a filter (w/o add-type):

filter isNumeric($x) {
    return $x -is [byte]  -or $x -is [int16]  -or $x -is [int32]  -or $x -is [int64]  `
       -or $x -is [sbyte] -or $x -is [uint16] -or $x -is [uint32] -or $x -is [uint64] `
       -or $x -is [float] -or $x -is [double] -or $x -is [decimal]
}
3
  • I think the native PowerShell route is the way I'll go. Thanks, @Christian. Commented Jun 7, 2012 at 17:13
  • 3
    Unable to find type [Helpers]
    – McVitas
    Commented May 21, 2020 at 20:08
  • This is the first answer that really tests if a variable holds a numeric value. All others test if a string represents a numeric value
    – ndemou
    Commented Sep 3, 2022 at 18:06
18

If you want to check if a string has a numeric value, use this code:

$a = "44.4"
$b = "ad"
$rtn = ""
[double]::TryParse($a,[ref]$rtn)
[double]::TryParse($b,[ref]$rtn)

Credits go here

13
PS> Add-Type -Assembly Microsoft.VisualBasic
PS> [Microsoft.VisualBasic.Information]::IsNumeric(1.5)
True

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.visualbasic.information.isnumeric.aspx

1
  • 1
    I thought this was pretty neat until I realised that it would return true for a string that was numeric such as "1.23" which is not what I want. I want to know if the type of the actual object is a numeric type, not whether or not it can be coerced to a numeric type. Thanks for a useful tip though, I can see where that will be very handy. Commented Jun 7, 2012 at 17:12
10

-is and -as operators requires a type you can compare against. If you're not sure what the type might be, try to evaluate the content (partial type list):

(Invoke-Expression '1.5').GetType().Name -match 'byte|short|int32|long|sbyte|ushort|uint32|ulong|float|double|decimal'

Good or bad, it can work against hex values as well (Invoke-Expression '0xA' ...)

2
  • That's a neat solution. For the context I need to use it though, Invoke-Expression could be quite dodgy! Commented Jun 8, 2012 at 14:48
  • 2
    Try{(Invoke-Expression '-123s.456e-789 ').GetType().Name -match 'byte|short|int32|long|sbyte|ushort|uint32|ulong|float|double|decimal'}Catch{$false}---Although you solution is almost perfect and flexible
    – Garric
    Commented Aug 30, 2020 at 4:50
6
filter isNumeric {
    $_ -is [ValueType]
}

-

1 -is [ValueType]
True
"1" -is [ValueType]
False

-

function isNumeric ($Value) {
    return $Value -is [ValueType]
}

isNumeric 1.23
True
isNumeric 123
True
isNumeric ""
False
isNumeric "asdf123"
False

-

(Invoke-Expression '1.5') -is [ValueType]
5
  • 1
    PS> [System.Reflection.BindingFlags]::CreateInstance -is [valuetype] (True)
    – x0n
    Commented Aug 28, 2018 at 14:10
  • 2
    PS> [char]"a" -is [valuetype] (True)
    – x0n
    Commented Aug 28, 2018 at 14:14
  • This is the right answer!
    – joeking
    Commented Jul 8, 2022 at 23:17
  • @x0n I don't know why but although your tests are ... true the function isNumeric correctly returns $false for both your cases. VERY strange but I'm also very tired.
    – ndemou
    Commented Sep 3, 2022 at 18:13
  • This is by far the best and most succinct PowerShell solution. Nicely done!
    – Jim
    Commented Jan 26, 2023 at 18:51
4
$itisint=$true
try{
 [int]$vartotest
}catch{
 "error converting to int"
 $itisint=$false
}

this is more universal, because this way you can test also strings (read from a file for example) if they represent number. The other solutions using -is [int] result in false if you would have "123" as string in a variable. This also works on machines with older powershell then 5.1

2
  • 2
    It’s always valuable to explain your code, but that’s especially true in a case like this where there’s a highly-rated accepted answer from eight years ago. Why is your approach preferred over the accepted answer? Do you mind updating your answer with more details? Commented May 22, 2020 at 5:44
  • 2
    If you are using Read-Host the result is always a string so you need to perform a check to see if the input even is numeric before converting. Generating and catching exceptions as flow control is always bad due to the amount of stuff done behind the scenes. The powershell way would be $converted = $myInput -as [int]. $converted will be $null if it could not convert, or the number if it was successful Commented Mar 5, 2022 at 18:08
3

Thank you all who contributed to this thread and helped me figure out how to test for numeric values. I wanted to post my results for how to handle negative numbers, for those who may also find this thread when searching...

Note: My function requires a string to be passed, due to using Trim().

function IsNumeric($value) {
# This function will test if a string value is numeric
#
# Parameters::
#
#   $value   - String to test
#
   return ($($value.Trim()) -match "^[-]?[0-9.]+$")
}
1
  • 7
    This will return true for version numbers like "9.3.4", you'd be better served by a regex like ^[-+]?([0-9]*\.[0-9]+|[0-9]+\.?)$ which will validate you have only an optional plus/minus; numbers and an single optional decimal point.
    – Ro Yo Mi
    Commented Apr 3, 2014 at 20:39
3

If you know the numeric type you want to test against (such as int for example in the code below), you can do it like this:

> [bool]("42" -as [int])
True
> [bool](42 -as [int])
True
> [bool]("hi" -as [int])
False

But note:

> [bool](42.1 -as [int])
True

Careful!:

It was pointed out that the code above fails to identify 0 as an int. You would need to add a guard for 0:

> $n -eq 0 -or $n -as [int]

Where $n is the object you are testing.

4
  • I like this one. Or '11' | where { $(if ($_ -as 'int') { 10 -le $_ }) }
    – js2010
    Commented Nov 13, 2022 at 18:00
  • Unfortunately: [bool](0 -as [int]) is False. Commented Jan 16, 2023 at 18:30
  • 1
    @HankSchultz thanks. That is a good bug to find. I have added a note at the end.
    – dan-gph
    Commented Jan 17, 2023 at 23:59
  • 1
    @dan-gph, to be clear, it isn't failing to recognize 0 as an int. Instead, it's casting 0 to False. Commented Mar 25 at 15:35
2

I ran into this topic while working on input validation with read-host. If I tried to specify the data type for the variable as part of the read-host command and the user entered something other than that data type then read-host would error out. This is how I got around that and ensured that the user enters the data type I wanted:

do
    {
    try
        {
        [int]$thing = read-host -prompt "Enter a number or else"
        $GotANumber = $true
        }
    catch
        {
        $GotANumber = $false
        }
    }
until
    ($gotanumber)
1
"-123.456e-789" -match "^\-?(\d+\.?\d*)(e\-?\d+)?$|^0x[0-9a-f]+$"

or

"0xab789" -match "^\-?(\d+\.?\d*)(e\-?\d+)?$|^0x[0-9a-f]+$"

will check for numbers (integers, floats and hex).

Please note that this does not cover the case of commas/dots being used as separators for thousands.

1

Each numeric type has its own value. See TypeCode enum definition: https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/system.typecode?view=netframework-4.8 Based on this info, all your numeric type-values are in the range from 5 to 15. This means, you can write the condition-check like this:

$typeValue = $x.getTypeCode().value__
if ($typeValue -ge 5 -and $typeValue -le 15) {"x has a numeric type!"}
0

Testing if a value is numeric or a string representation of a numeric value.

function Test-Number 
{
    Param
    (
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true,
                   Position=0)]
        [ValidatePattern("^[\d\.]+$")]
        $Number
    )

    $Number -is [ValueType] -or [Double]::TryParse($Number,[ref]$null)
}

Testing if a value is numeric.

function Test-Number 
{
    Param
    (
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true,
                   Position=0)]
        [ValidatePattern("^[\d\.]+$")]
        $Number
    )

    $Number -is [ValueType]
}
1
  • 1
    $n=0; [Double]::TryParse('1e2', [ref]$n) will parse it as a string representation of a number, but your functions will fail it. Same with negative numbers. Commented Feb 18, 2017 at 3:24

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