172

I have a web request that is working properly, but it is just returning the status OK, but I need the object I am asking for it to return. I am not sure how to get the json value I am requesting. I am new to using the object HttpClient, is there a property I am missing out on? I really need the returning object. Thanks for any help

Making the call - runs fine returns the status OK.

HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept
  .Add(new MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue("application/json"));
var responseMsg = client.GetAsync(string.Format("http://localhost:5057/api/Photo")).Result;

The api get method

//Cut out a lot of code but you get the idea
public string Get()
{
    return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(returnedPhoto);
}
1
  • Are you asking how to get the response content when using the .NET 4.5 HttpClient class? Jun 7, 2012 at 9:06

7 Answers 7

252

If you are referring to the System.Net.HttpClient in .NET 4.5, you can get the content returned by GetAsync using the HttpResponseMessage.Content property as an HttpContent-derived object. You can then read the contents to a string using the HttpContent.ReadAsStringAsync method or as a stream using the ReadAsStreamAsync method.

The HttpClient class documentation includes this example:

  HttpClient client = new HttpClient();
  HttpResponseMessage response = await client.GetAsync("http://www.contoso.com/");
  response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode();
  string responseBody = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
8
  • 5
    Haven't tested this but the documentation of EnsureSuccessStatusCode says "If the Content is not null, this method will also call Dispose to free managed and unmanaged resources." so you may wish to read the content first. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… Nov 29, 2013 at 2:01
  • 4
    No reason for this. As evidenced by Reflector, EnsureSuccessStatusCode will dispose ONLY if the status code is unsuccesful, right before throwing an exception. Yet another case where the documentation text is slightly confusing. Nov 29, 2013 at 7:49
  • 2
    Why not just client.GetStringAsync(...)? Was that not around in 2012. They'd both throw an exception if the response was not 200 right? Jan 17, 2018 at 5:08
  • 1
    @Simon_Weaver because that wasn't the question - the OP asked how to read the string from the response. There are differences. You can't inspect the response with GetStringAsync which means you don't know what the response message was. You probably don't want to throw if a 3xx response is returned. You probably want to retry without throwing if a throttling error is returned. Jan 17, 2018 at 8:32
  • 1
    @Simon_Weaver there are a lot of ways to make that call - why not GetAsync<T> ? Or GetStreamAsync and pass the stream to Json.NET, avoiding the temporary string? Again, it may be preferable to use GetAsync first then access the content object Jan 17, 2018 at 8:33
79

Building on @Panagiotis Kanavos' answer, here's a working method as example which will also return the response as an object instead of a string:

using System.Text;
using System.Net.Http;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Newtonsoft.Json; // Nuget Package

public static async Task<object> PostCallAPI(string url, object jsonObject)
{
    try
    {
        using (HttpClient client = new HttpClient())
        {
            var content = new StringContent(jsonObject.ToString(), Encoding.UTF8, "application/json");
            var response = await client.PostAsync(url, content);
            if (response != null)
            {
                var jsonString = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
                return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<object>(jsonString);
            }
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        myCustomLogger.LogException(ex);
    }
    return null;
}

Keep in mind that this is only an example and that you'd probably would like to use HttpClient as a shared instance instead of using it in a using-clause.

4
  • 2
    Be carefull httpclient does not dispose like that with the using statment May 25, 2019 at 18:17
  • Since await returns immediately, it is possible that if (response != null) is executed before the post call has completed?
    – Nishant
    Jun 21, 2019 at 0:40
  • I don't see a difference, even though you said "return the response as an object instead of a string.", if that is the case, why are you doing an extra manual step using JsonConvert.DeserializedObject(), i.e. you are converting string to object on the client after it has been received (as a string).
    – joedotnot
    Jan 8, 2021 at 13:09
  • @Nishant: fair question. The code after the await in that method will NOT execute until the Task has completed. Then a thread will be assigned for code in this method to continue executing. The line: if (response != null) will not execute until the awaited Task on the line preceding has completed.
    – JohnB
    Mar 24, 2021 at 21:49
63

Install this nuget package from Microsoft System.Net.Http.Json. It contains extension methods.

Then add using System.Net.Http.Json

Now, you'll be able to see these methods:

enter image description here

So you can now do this:

await httpClient.GetFromJsonAsync<IList<WeatherForecast>>("weatherforecast");

Source: https://www.stevejgordon.co.uk/sending-and-receiving-json-using-httpclient-with-system-net-http-json

2
  • 3
    This is the easiest way to go these days.
    – Safari137
    Oct 27, 2021 at 17:14
  • 10
    When someone uses non-getter method there is also a helper method extracting JSON from the received response content -- ReadFromJsonAsync. Nov 3, 2021 at 6:11
11

I think the shortest way is:

var client = new HttpClient();
string reqUrl = $"http://myhost.mydomain.com/api/products/{ProdId}";
var prodResp = await client.GetAsync(reqUrl);
if (!prodResp.IsSuccessStatusCode){
    FailRequirement();
}
var prods = await prodResp.Content.ReadAsAsync<Products>();
1
  • 13
    Just thought id add that ReadAsAsync is an extension method. you will need to use System.Net.Http.Formatting for .net 4+ and Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.Client for .net core. to get this working.
    – Squibly
    Jan 23, 2020 at 2:21
2

What I normally do, similar to answer one:

var response = await httpClient.GetAsync(completeURL); // http://192.168.0.1:915/api/Controller/Object

if (response.IsSuccessStatusCode == true)
    {
        string res = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
        var content = Json.Deserialize<Model>(res);

// do whatever you need with the JSON which is in 'content'
// ex: int id = content.Id;

        Navigate();
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        await JSRuntime.Current.InvokeAsync<string>("alert", "Warning, the credentials you have entered are incorrect.");
        return false;
    }

Where 'model' is your C# model class.

2

It's working fine for me by the following way -

public async Task<object> TestMethod(TestModel model)
    {
        try
        {
            var apicallObject = new
            {
                Id= model.Id,
                name= model.Name
            };

            if (apicallObject != null)
            {
                var bodyContent = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(apicallObject);
                using (HttpClient client = new HttpClient())
                {
                    var content = new StringContent(bodyContent.ToString(), Encoding.UTF8, "application/json");
                    content.Headers.ContentType = new MediaTypeHeaderValue("application/json");
                    client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Add("access-token", _token); // _token = access token
                    var response = await client.PostAsync(_url, content); // _url =api endpoint url
                    if (response != null)
                    {
                        var jsonString = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();

                        try
                        {
                            var result = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<TestModel2>(jsonString); // TestModel2 = deserialize object
                        }
                        catch (Exception e){
                            //msg
                            throw e;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw ex;
        }
        return null;
    }
0

The code below is to access your HttpResponseMessage and extract your response from HttpContent.

string result = ret.Result.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result;

Convert your json in a structure according with your business In my case BatchPDF is a complex object that it is being populated by result variable.

BatchPDF batchJson = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<BatchPDF>(result);

return batchJson;

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