349

Let's say I have an anchor tag such as

<a href="#" ng-click="do()">Click</a>

How can I prevent the browser from navigating to # in AngularJS ?

5
  • 15
    Like Chris says below, just leave out the href.
    – Jesse
    Apr 18, 2013 at 14:54
  • 13
    That's not what Chris says, Jesse, use href='' to keep the mouse pointer behavior.
    – oma
    Oct 12, 2013 at 15:44
  • 1
    You just remove the # sign from href, it is Ok. Jan 12, 2016 at 9:54
  • 4
    Or just use href="javascript:void(0);" to keep the pointer but have no action (until you add another click handler)
    – Robba
    Oct 26, 2016 at 10:00
  • 1
    Could you please change accepted answer to the best and the most voted one by Chris – stackoverflow.com/a/11672909 ? Feb 8, 2018 at 14:04

28 Answers 28

323

According to the docs for ngHref you should be able to leave off the href or do href="".

<input ng-model="value" /><br />
<a id="link-1" href ng-click="value = 1">link 1</a> (link, don't reload)<br />
<a id="link-2" href="" ng-click="value = 2">link 2</a> (link, don't reload)<br />
<a id="link-4" href="" name="xx" ng-click="value = 4">anchor</a> (link, don't reload)<br />
<a id="link-5" name="xxx" ng-click="value = 5">anchor</a> (no link)<br />
17
  • 6
    It's the only actual good answer. Anything that requires touching the DOM or native events is questionable
    – vincent
    Apr 5, 2013 at 20:21
  • 4
    This is the correct answer. If you drop href from the <a> attribute AngularJS will call prevent default: Apr 21, 2013 at 10:41
  • 25
    The only downside of leaving off the href attribute is that you lose the normal 'pointer' cursor when hovering over a link. You can fix this by adding a rule to your stylesheet: a:hover { cursor:pointer; }
    – karlgold
    Jun 9, 2013 at 14:57
  • 37
    Keep in mind that this also makes the tag un-tabbable, which is not very accessibility friendly. Nov 13, 2013 at 5:33
  • 3
    For me the browser still bubbles the click action :/
    – Matej
    Feb 26, 2015 at 3:17
261

UPDATE: I've since changed my mind on this solution. After more development and time spent working on this, I believe a better solution to this problem is to do the following:

<a ng-click="myFunction()">Click Here</a>

And then update your css to have an extra rule:

a[ng-click]{
    cursor: pointer;
}

Its much more simple and provides the exact same functionality and is much more efficient. Hope that might be helpful to anyone else looking up this solution in the future.


The following is my previous solution, which I am leaving here just for legacy purposes:

If you are having this problem a lot, a simple directive that would fix this issue is the following:

app.directive('a', function() {
    return {
        restrict: 'E',
        link: function(scope, elem, attrs) {
            if(attrs.ngClick || attrs.href === '' || attrs.href === '#'){
                elem.on('click', function(e){
                    e.preventDefault();
                });
            }
        }
   };
});

It checks all anchor tags (<a></a>) to see if their href attribute is either an empty string ("") or a hash ('#') or there is an ng-click assignment. If it finds any of these conditions, it catches the event and prevents the default behavior.

The only down side is that it runs this directive for all anchor tags. So if you have a lot of anchor tags on the page and you only want to prevent the default behavior for a small number of them, then this directive isn't very efficient. However, I almost always want to preventDefault, so I use this directive all over in my AngularJS apps.

16
  • Thanks for the idea. Had to modify it to get it working in IE8. See my answer below.
    – Lukus
    Sep 19, 2013 at 22:19
  • 1
    As stated in other answers, having a blank href attribute has varying behavior in different browsers. Although I agree it is by far the cleanest and most efficient solution, it does have some cross-browser issues. Using the directive approach allows the browser to handle the <a> tag as it normally would, but still getting the OP the answer they were looking for.
    – tennisgent
    Nov 26, 2013 at 4:19
  • 2
    This works and all but its seriously overkill for a very simple problem. Angular gives you access to the event object with $event, so you can do exactly what you would do in plain js or jquery click events. See this answer stackoverflow.com/a/19240232/1826354 and my comment on it Feb 13, 2014 at 19:14
  • 1
    Yep. You can. There's two other answers on this post that already do what you're describing. And I agree, it is overkill. That's why I made the update that I did.
    – tennisgent
    Feb 14, 2014 at 21:09
  • 7
    This is fine if you don't care about accessibility on your site. By leaving off the href, its not possible to use your keyboard to tab onto that item. Unless you added a tabindex. With all that in mind, why not just use preventDefault...? That's what its there for.
    – duhseekoh
    Feb 3, 2015 at 22:01
244

You can pass the $event object to your method, and call $event.preventDefault() on it, so that the default processing will not occur:

<a href="#" ng-click="do($event)">Click</a>

// then in your controller.do($event) method
$event.preventDefault()
8
  • 14
    yes, and you can also call $event.stopPropagation() so that the event doesn't bubble up (basically, you have access to the Event object as defined by the W3C : w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-2-Events/events.html#Events-Event )
    – mna
    Jul 31, 2012 at 1:12
  • 1
    Please note that at the time this was written, leaving the href empty (or absent) did not work on IE8/9 and Opera. This was a year ago, and I haven't had the chance to try it again (I opened an issue back then on Github, but I think they reset the issues some time ago). If this is fixed (or you don't care for these browsers), then by all means, use Chris' answer! If someone can try it out and comment/edit answer, even better.
    – mna
    Jun 6, 2013 at 14:19
  • 1
    @PuerkitoBio - I can confirm that IE8 and below still requires $event.preventDefault()... IE tax.
    – Scotty.NET
    Jul 18, 2013 at 15:47
  • 4
    passing the $event to the controller means referencing the DOM in your controller, which means you've coupled your view and your controller. You can call $event methods directly in your evaluated expression: ng-click="do(); $event.preventDefault() for example... although, it's not necessary because @Chris's answer below is the correct one. This might help people in situations where they have nested ngClicks and they want to call $event.stopPropagation(), however.
    – Ben Lesh
    Oct 8, 2013 at 21:13
  • 2
    Finally a SEO friendly solution. You might want to also update browser URL without reloading the ng-view - joelsaupe.com/programming/… That way you have links that not reload your view, but can be openned in a new tab and search engines can follow them. YAY!
    – Tom
    Jul 19, 2014 at 12:49
111

I prefer to use directives for this kind of thing. Here's an example

<a href="#" ng-click="do()" eat-click>Click Me</a>

And the directive code for eat-click:

module.directive('eatClick', function() {
    return function(scope, element, attrs) {
        $(element).click(function(event) {
            event.preventDefault();
        });
    }
})

Now you can add the eat-click attribute to any element and it will get preventDefault()'ed automagically.

Benefits:

  1. You don't have to pass the ugly $event object into your do() function.
  2. Your controller is more unit testable because it doesn't need to stub out the $event object
7
  • 1
    @Kato Angular comes with its own subset of jQuery, to make our lives easy.
    – Neil
    Jul 9, 2013 at 11:04
  • 3
    Additional benefit - this also works in IE8 and below, if that matters to you.
    – Scotty.NET
    Jul 19, 2013 at 10:46
  • 1
    I am getting Error: $ is not defined. What am I missing? Jul 24, 2013 at 9:34
  • 9
    I tried angular.element(element).bind('click', function(event){...});. It worked. Ref: jQLite Jul 24, 2013 at 9:52
  • 3
    Introducing a directive for something simple like that seems a bit bloated if you ask me... Check Chris his answer below
    – Wilt
    Aug 19, 2013 at 8:42
56

Although Renaud gave a great solution

<a href="#" ng-click="do(); $event.preventDefault()">Click</a> 

I personally found you also need $event.stopPropagation() in some cases to avoid some of the side effects

<a href="#" ng-click="do(); $event.preventDefault(); $event.stopPropagation();">
    Click</a>

will be my solution

0
34
ng-click="$event.preventDefault()"
1
  • 13
    This is the best solution. Of course, you could pass the $event object to your scope function as well. Like ng-click="myFunction($event, otherParams) and then $event.preventDefault() in myFunction. Rolling your own directive for this is overkill Feb 13, 2014 at 19:07
34

The easiest solution I have found is this one :

<a href="#" ng-click="do(); $event.preventDefault()">Click</a>
1
  • This is not only the easiest, but it also does not couple events with the controller like suggested in other solutions. Coupling events to a controller is something you should avoid at all costs since it makes testing a lot harder.
    – jornare
    Feb 28, 2014 at 12:18
11

So reading through these answers, @Chris still has the most "correct" answer, I suppose, but it has one problem, it doesn't show the "pointer"....

So here are two ways to solve this problem without needing to add a cursor:pointer style:

  1. Use javascript:void(0) instead of #:

    <a href="javascript:void(0)" ng-click="doSomething()">Do Something</a>
    
  2. Use $event.preventDefault() in the ng-click directive (so you don't junk up your controller with DOM-related references):

    <a href="#dontGoHere" ng-click="doSomething(); $event.preventDefault()">Do Something</a>
    

Personally I prefer the former over the latter. javascript:void(0) has other benefits that are discussed here. There is also discussion of "unobtrusive JavaScript" in that link which is frighteningly recent, and doesn't necessarily directly apply to an angular application.

3
  • 2
    Why is this downvoted? I also noticed that the pointer is not showing with the answer from Chris. Apr 14, 2014 at 7:57
  • 2
    javascript:void(0) is much better than # which can act on the route if you mis-configure it. +1 Apr 27, 2014 at 13:32
  • 2
    I was just about to write an answer to this. You can also do javascript:;
    – Adrian
    Apr 9, 2017 at 3:11
10

You can do as follows

1.Remove href attribute from anchor(a) tag

2.Set pointer cursor in css to ng click elements

 [ng-click],
 [data-ng-click],
 [x-ng-click] {
     cursor: pointer;
 }
9

HTML

here pure angularjs: near to ng-click function you can write preventDefault() function by seperating semicolon

<a href="#" ng-click="do(); $event.preventDefault(); $event.stopPropagation();">Click me</a>

JS

$scope.do = function() {
    alert("do here anything..");
}

(or)

you can proceed this way, this is already discussed some one here.

HTML

<a href="#" ng-click="do()">Click me</a>

JS

$scope.do = function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    event.stopPropagation()
}
7

Since you are making a web app why do you need links?

Swap your anchors to buttons!

<button ng-click="do()"></button>
5
  • 2
    Since wen can't webapps have anchors? Aug 14, 2014 at 12:48
  • 1
    I was referring to the point that most web-app don't need relative links like websites do, they also often just use anchor links as javascript triggers and don't link to a page; therefore a button with the default style reset is just as semantically correct if not more so. Aug 14, 2014 at 12:50
  • 3
    @sidonaldson Actually, a lot of web-apps nowdays heavily depends on links. Look at angularjs routing.
    – Robert
    May 22, 2015 at 9:58
  • 1
    @Robert yes but if you use the built in routing you don't have to manage prevent default, it's done for you. I assume since the poster wants to cancel an anchor link he's talking about non-route links. For example launching a modal etc May 22, 2015 at 16:15
  • 2
    This answer should have a lot more upvotes. In many cases, if you are wanting to prevent default anchor behavior, you are using the anchor as a button and not a link.
    – ItsCosmo
    Nov 17, 2015 at 6:06
7

Try this option which I can see is not yet listed above :

<a href="" ng-click="do()">Click</a>
0
6

if still relevant:

<a ng-click="unselect($event)" />

...

scope.unselect = function( event ) {
 event.preventDefault();
 event.stopPropagation();
}

...
6

The safest way to avoid events on an href would be to define it as

<a href="javascript:void(0)" ....>
0
5

I would go with:

<a ng-click="do()">Click</a>
  • because according to the docs you should be able to leave of the href and then Angular will handle the prevent default for you!

Whole this prevent default thing has been confusing to me, so I have created a JSFiddle there illustrate when and where Angular is preventing default.

The JSFiddle is using Angular's a directive - so it should be EXACTLY the same. You can see the source code here: a tag source code

I hope this will help clarification for some.

I would have liked to post the doc to ngHref but I can't because of my reputation.

5

This is what I always do. Works like a charm!

<a href ng-click="do()">Click</a>
4

Or if you need inline then you can do this:

<a href="#" ng-click="show = !show; $event.preventDefault()">Click to show</a>
4

Lot of answers seem to be overkill. FOR ME , this works

 <a ng-href="#" ng-click="$event.preventDefault();vm.questionContainer($index)">{{question.Verbiage}}</a>
3

If you are using Angular 8 or more you can create a directive:

import { Directive, HostListener } from '@angular/core';

@Directive({
  selector: '[preventDefault]'
})
export class PreventDefaultDirective {

  @HostListener("click", ["$event"])
  public onClick(event: any): void
  {
    console.log('click');
    debugger;
      event.preventDefault();
  }

}

On your anchor tag on the component you can wire it like this:

  <a ngbDropdownToggle preventDefault class="nav-link dropdown-toggle" href="#" aria-expanded="false" aria-haspopup="true" id="nav-dropdown-2">Pages</a>

App Module should have its declaration:

import { PreventDefaultDirective } from './shared/directives/preventdefault.directive';


@NgModule({
  declarations: [
    AppComponent,
    PreventDefaultDirective
1
  • This works for me but I had to change selector to 'prevent-default' in directive and later in html use it as 'prevent-default', Angular 13
    – krul
    May 4, 2022 at 10:44
2

I need a presence of href attribute's value for degradation (when js is switched off), so I can't use empty href attribute (or "#"), but the code above did not work for me, because i need an event (e) variable. I created my own directive:

angular.module('MyApp').directive('clickPrevent', function() {
  return function(scope, element, attrs) {
    return element.on('click', function(e) {
      return e.preventDefault();
    });
  };
});

In HTML:

<a data-click-prevent="true" href="/users/sign_up" ng-click="openSignUpModal()">Sign up</a>
2

Borrowing from tennisgent's answer. I like that you don't have to create a custom directive to add on all the links. However, I couldnt get his to work in IE8. Here's what finally worked for me (using angular 1.0.6).

Notice that 'bind' allows you to use jqLite provided by angular so no need to wrap with full jQuery. Also required the stopPropogation method.

.directive('a', [
    function() {
        return {
            restrict: 'E',
            link: function(scope, elem, attrs) {

                elem.bind('click', function(e){
                    if (attrs.ngClick || attrs.href === '' || attrs.href == '#'){
                        e.preventDefault();
                        e.stopPropagation();
                    }
                })
            }
        };
    }
])
1
  • 3
    This kills to much. For example, when I use Twitter Bootstrap's dropdown, I want the propagation but not the default behaviour. This snippet is NOT recommended. Aug 14, 2014 at 12:47
2

I ran into this same issue when using anchors for an angular bootstrap drop down. The only solution I found that avoided unwanted side effects (ie. the drop down not closing because of using preventDefault()) was to use the following:

 <a href="javascript:;" ng-click="do()">Click</a>
2

if you never want to go to href... you should change your markup and use a button not an anchor tag because semantically it's not an anchor or a link. Inversely if you have a button that does some checks and then redirects it should be a link / anchor tag and not a button... for SEO purposes as well testing [insert test suite here].

for links that you only want to redirect conditionally like prompting to save changes, or acknowledge dirty state... you should use ng-click="someFunction($event)" and in someFunction on your validationError preventDefault and or stopPropagation.

also just because you can doesn't mean you should. javascript:void(0) worked well back in the day... but because of the nefarious hackers/crackers browsers flag apps/sites that use javascript within an href... see no reason to ducktype above..

it's 2016 since 2010 should be no reason anywhere to use links that act like buttons... if you still have to support IE8 and below you need to re-evaluate your place of business.

1
/* NG CLICK PREVENT DEFAULT */

app.directive('ngClick', function () {
    return {
        link: function (scope, element, attributes) {
            element.click(function (event) {
                event.preventDefault();
                event.stopPropagation();
            });
        }
    };
});
1

What you should do, is omit the href attribute entirely.

If you look at the source code for the a element directive (which is a part of the Angular core), it states at line 29 - 31:

if (!element.attr(href)) {
    event.preventDefault();
}

Which means Angular already is solving the issue of links without a href. The only issue you still have is the css problem. You can still apply the pointer style to anchors that have ng-clicks, e.g.:

a[ng-click] {
    /* Styles for anchors without href but WITH ng-click */
    cursor: pointer;
}

So, you could even make your site more accessible by marking real links with a subtle, different styling then links that perform functions.

Happy coding!

1

You can disable url redirection inside $location's Html5Mode to achieve the objective. You can define it inside the specific controller used for the page. Something like this:

app.config(['$locationProvider', function ($locationProvider) {
    $locationProvider.html5Mode({
        enabled: true,
        rewriteLinks: false,
        requireBase: false
    });
}]);

0

In my case Angular: 10 - work this

  <a [routerLink]="" (click)="myFunc()"> Click me </a>

Updated: This approach will reload the resolvers. Thanks @Meeker

2
  • 1
    this will reload resolvers depending on your setup.
    – Meeker
    Apr 28, 2021 at 15:57
  • Thank you. I did not know it. Will be use css for this case. Apr 28, 2021 at 16:52
-1

An alternative might be:

<span ng-click="do()">Click</span>
6
  • 1
    It's horrible practice to abuse a span for clicking purposes. Just go for @tennisgent's answer -- anchors without href defined. Aug 14, 2014 at 12:52
  • 1
    @RobinvanBaalen The span element has been defined as clickable since at least HTML 4.0.1: w3.org/TR/html401/struct/global.html#edef-SPAN w3.org/TR/html5/dom.html#global-attributes html.spec.whatwg.org/multipage/dom.html#global-attributes Jan 22, 2015 at 16:39
  • 1
    If you do <span>Hello</span> since when is that clickable? What the spec probably says is that a <span> can be used inside a clickable element such as <a> or <button>. But then again, all inline block elements (img, span, etc) can be made clickable that way. A span itself is not clickable. Jan 22, 2015 at 16:42
  • 1
    @RobinvanBaalen Please see the links above. The onclick attribute for span elements has been defined since at least HTML 4.01. Jan 22, 2015 at 16:49
  • 1
    I never said that adding an event handler wouldn't work for a span. I said it is bad practice to make a non-clickable element like a span, div, section, ul, li, etc. clickable by using a javascript event handler. It's all about semantics. Semantics within HTML is the practice of giving content on the page meaning and structure by using the proper element. Jan 22, 2015 at 17:07

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