7

I want to created a nested class that can only be visible to and instantiated from the parent class.
But I also want to be able to use an instance of the nested class through a public variable of the parent class.
I tried making the nested class private, or making the nested class' constructor private, but it won't compile.
Is it possible to do this in .NET?

This compiles and works, but the nested class can be used by anybody:

 Public Class OuterClass
        Public X As Integer = 123
        Public NestedClassInstance As New NestedClass(Me)

        Public Class NestedClass
            Private Parent As OuterClass

            Public Sub New(ByVal _Parent As OuterClass)
                Parent = _Parent
            End Sub

            Public Sub GetParentX()
                Debug.WriteLine("X = " & Parent.X.ToString)
            End Sub
        End Class
    End Class

    Sub Main()
        Dim OuterClassInstance As New OuterClass
        OuterClassInstance.NestedClassInstance.GetParentX()
    End Sub
3
  • The only thing that is special about a nested class is that it can access the containing class's private and protected members (provided it has a reference to one). Is this the functionality of the nested class that you cared about or were you trying to do something else? Jun 7 '12 at 18:28
  • Mostly I am trying to keep the nested class out of Intellisense, and also have an insurance that it cannot be instantiated except by the parent class.
    – mcu
    Jun 7 '12 at 18:32
  • To me, nested private class definitions should only be available to the holding class, in the same way that private variables are, in that they are private to that one class. But if the holding class instantiates it and assigns it to a public variable inside the holding class, the instance should accessible to anyone as a field of the holding class. It just seems like a very natural object behavior to me. Oh well.
    – mcu
    Jun 7 '12 at 20:31
7

Typically the Private nested class implements an interface or inherits another class, and the interface/base class is exposed. This is useful when you want to hide the implementation to the parent class. Something like this:

Module EntryPoint
    Sub Main()
        Dim OuterClassInstance As New OuterClass
        OuterClassInstance.NestedClassInstance.GetParentX()
    End Sub
End Module

Public Class OuterClass
    Public X As Integer = 123
    Public NestedClassInstance As ISomeImplementation = New NestedClass(Me)

    Private Class NestedClass
        Implements ISomeImplementation
        Private Parent As OuterClass

        Public Sub New(ByVal _Parent As OuterClass)
            Parent = _Parent
        End Sub

        Public Sub GetParentX() Implements ISomeImplementation.GetParentX
            Debug.WriteLine("X = " & Parent.X.ToString)
        End Sub
    End Class
End Class

Public Interface ISomeImplementation
    Sub GetParentX()
End Interface
2
  • That works for the most part, thanks. It just has one deficiency that I found. If the nested class has public fields, I cannot use them through an interface unless I implement them as properties.
    – mcu
    Jun 7 '12 at 18:53
  • I also moved the interface inside the parent class. It made it more self-contained.
    – mcu
    Jun 7 '12 at 18:54
3

You can't have a private nested class that is also exposed through a public interface.

It is an either or proposition - either the nested class is private, or it is not.

An option is to declare an interface with the contract you want the nested class to implement (with some refactoring tools you can extract an interface from a class) and expose the interface, while keeping the nested class private.

0

If you are just trying to keep clients from using your object outside your library then simply make the constructor friend. That way only code in your Assembly can create the object.

6
  • Hmm, I tried using a private constructor, but then the parent class could not instantiate it either.
    – mcu
    Jun 7 '12 at 18:51
  • friend limits the accessibility to the assembly, so it may or may not work for the OP Jun 7 '12 at 18:58
  • I tried friend, but I could still instantiate the nested class anywhere in the same assembly.
    – mcu
    Jun 7 '12 at 19:00
  • Not much point in hiding an object from yourself. I would suggest the Interface or abstract super class approach from vscjones as the best fit then, though I don't understand the reasoning.
    – tcarvin
    Jun 7 '12 at 19:13
  • I may be missing something, but my reasoning is if I work on the same (possibly large) assembly two years from now, or someone else works on it, this would be a way to ensure that the nested class doesn't get used by itself. Plus, I don't want it in Intellisense.
    – mcu
    Jun 7 '12 at 20:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.