1501

I am relatively new to Java, and often find that I need to sort a Map<Key, Value> on the values.

Since the values are not unique, I find myself converting the keySet into an array, and sorting that array through array sort with a custom comparator that sorts on the value associated with the key.

Is there an easier way?

  • 18
    A map is not meant to be sorted, but accessed fast. Object equal values break the constraint of the map. Use the entry set, like List<Map.Entry<...>> list =new LinkedList(map.entrySet()) and Collections.sort .... it that way. – Hannes Feb 9 '14 at 17:34
  • A case where this might arise when we try to make use of a Counter in Java (Map<Object, Integer>). Sorting by number of occurrences would then be a common operation. A language like Python has a built in Counter data structure. For an alternate way of implementation in Java, here is an example – demongolem Dec 21 '17 at 20:03
  • 3
    There are plenty of use cases for sorted maps, that's why you have TreeMap and ConcurrentSkipListMap in jdk. – alobodzk Apr 22 '18 at 19:10

49 Answers 49

3

You can try Guava's multimaps:

TreeMap<Integer, Collection<String>> sortedMap = new TreeMap<>(
        Multimaps.invertFrom(Multimaps.forMap(originalMap), 
        ArrayListMultimap.<Integer, String>create()).asMap());

As a result you get a map from original values to collections of keys that correspond to them. This approach can be used even if there are multiple keys for the same value.

2

When I'm faced with this, I just create a list on the side. If you put them together in a custom Map implementation, it'll have a nice feel to it... You can use something like the following, performing the sort only when needed. (Note: I haven't really tested this, but it compiles... might be a silly little bug in there somewhere)

(If you want it sorted by both keys and values, have the class extend TreeMap, don't define the accessor methods, and have the mutators call super.xxxxx instead of map_.xxxx)

package com.javadude.sample;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;

public class SortedValueHashMap<K, V> implements Map<K, V> {
    private Map<K, V> map_ = new HashMap<K, V>();
    private List<V> valueList_ = new ArrayList<V>();
    private boolean needsSort_ = false;
    private Comparator<V> comparator_;

    public SortedValueHashMap() {
    }
    public SortedValueHashMap(List<V> valueList) {
        valueList_ = valueList;
    }

    public List<V> sortedValues() {
        if (needsSort_) {
            needsSort_ = false;
            Collections.sort(valueList_, comparator_);
        }
        return valueList_;
    }

    // mutators
    public void clear() {
        map_.clear();
        valueList_.clear();
        needsSort_ = false;
    }

    public V put(K key, V value) {
        valueList_.add(value);
        needsSort_ = true;
        return map_.put(key, value);
    }

    public void putAll(Map<? extends K, ? extends V> m) {
        map_.putAll(m);
        valueList_.addAll(m.values());
        needsSort_ = true;
    }

    public V remove(Object key) {
        V value = map_.remove(key);
        valueList_.remove(value);
        return value;
    }

    // accessors
    public boolean containsKey(Object key)           { return map_.containsKey(key); }
    public boolean containsValue(Object value)       { return map_.containsValue(value); }
    public Set<java.util.Map.Entry<K, V>> entrySet() { return map_.entrySet(); }
    public boolean equals(Object o)                  { return map_.equals(o); }
    public V get(Object key)                         { return map_.get(key); }
    public int hashCode()                            { return map_.hashCode(); }
    public boolean isEmpty()                         { return map_.isEmpty(); }
    public Set<K> keySet()                           { return map_.keySet(); }
    public int size()                                { return map_.size(); }
    public Collection<V> values()                    { return map_.values(); }
}
2

This method will just serve the purpose. (the 'setback' is that the Values must implement the java.util.Comparable interface)

  /**

 * Sort a map according to values.

 * @param <K> the key of the map.
 * @param <V> the value to sort according to.
 * @param mapToSort the map to sort.

 * @return a map sorted on the values.

 */ 
public static <K, V extends Comparable< ? super V>> Map<K, V>
sortMapByValues(final Map <K, V> mapToSort)
{
    List<Map.Entry<K, V>> entries =
        new ArrayList<Map.Entry<K, V>>(mapToSort.size());  

    entries.addAll(mapToSort.entrySet());

    Collections.sort(entries,
                     new Comparator<Map.Entry<K, V>>()
    {
        @Override
        public int compare(
               final Map.Entry<K, V> entry1,
               final Map.Entry<K, V> entry2)
        {
            return entry1.getValue().compareTo(entry2.getValue());
        }
    });      

    Map<K, V> sortedMap = new LinkedHashMap<K, V>();      

    for (Map.Entry<K, V> entry : entries)
    {
        sortedMap.put(entry.getKey(), entry.getValue());

    }      

    return sortedMap;

}

http://javawithswaranga.blogspot.com/2011/06/generic-method-to-sort-hashmap.html

2

Here is the code by Java 8 with AbacusUtil

Map<String, Integer> map = N.asMap("a", 2, "b", 3, "c", 1, "d", 2);
Map<String, Integer> sortedMap = Stream.of(map.entrySet()).sorted(Map.Entry.comparingByValue()).toMap(e -> e.getKey(), e -> e.getValue(),
    LinkedHashMap::new);
N.println(sortedMap);
// output: {c=1, a=2, d=2, b=3}

Declaration: I'm the developer of AbacusUtil.

  • 1
    What part of the answer is using AbacusUtil? Just the toMap() helper? – AjahnCharles Aug 19 '17 at 17:13
1

The simplest brute-force sortHashMap method for HashMap<String, Long>: you can just copypaste it and use like this:

public class Test  {
    public static void main(String[] args)  {
        HashMap<String, Long> hashMap = new HashMap<>();
        hashMap.put("Cat", (long) 4);
        hashMap.put("Human", (long) 2);
        hashMap.put("Dog", (long) 4);
        hashMap.put("Fish", (long) 0);
        hashMap.put("Tree", (long) 1);
        hashMap.put("Three-legged-human", (long) 3);
        hashMap.put("Monkey", (long) 2);

        System.out.println(hashMap);  //{Human=2, Cat=4, Three-legged-human=3, Monkey=2, Fish=0, Tree=1, Dog=4}
        System.out.println(sortHashMap(hashMap));  //{Cat=4, Dog=4, Three-legged-human=3, Human=2, Monkey=2, Tree=1, Fish=0}
    }

    public LinkedHashMap<String, Long> sortHashMap(HashMap<String, Long> unsortedMap)  {
        LinkedHashMap<String, Long> result = new LinkedHashMap<>();

        //add String keys to an array: the array would get sorted, based on those keys' values
        ArrayList<String> sortedKeys = new ArrayList<>();
        for (String key: unsortedMap.keySet())  {
            sortedKeys.add(key);
        }

        //sort the ArrayList<String> of keys    
        for (int i=0; i<unsortedMap.size(); i++)  {
            for (int j=1; j<sortedKeys.size(); j++)  {
                if (unsortedMap.get(sortedKeys.get(j)) > unsortedMap.get(sortedKeys.get(j-1))) {
                    String temp = sortedKeys.get(j);
                    sortedKeys.set(j, sortedKeys.get(j-1));
                    sortedKeys.set(j-1, temp);
                }
            }
        }

        // construct the result Map
        for (String key: sortedKeys)  {
            result.put(key, unsortedMap.get(key));
        }

        return result;
    }
}
0

My solution is a quite simple approach in the way of using mostly given APIs. We use the feature of Map to export its content as Set via entrySet() method. We now have a Set containing Map.Entry objects.

Okay, a Set does not carry an order, but we can take the content an put it into an ArrayList. It now has an random order, but we will sort it anyway.

As ArrayList is a Collection, we now use the Collections.sort() method to bring order to chaos. Because our Map.Entry objects do not realize the kind of comparison we need, we provide a custom Comparator.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    HashMap<String, String> map = new HashMap<>();
    map.put("Z", "E");
    map.put("G", "A");
    map.put("D", "C");
    map.put("E", null);
    map.put("O", "C");
    map.put("L", "D");
    map.put("Q", "B");
    map.put("A", "F");
    map.put(null, "X");
    MapEntryComparator mapEntryComparator = new MapEntryComparator();

    List<Entry<String,String>> entryList = new ArrayList<>(map.entrySet());
    Collections.sort(entryList, mapEntryComparator);

    for (Entry<String, String> entry : entryList) {
        System.out.println(entry.getKey() + " : " + entry.getValue());
    }

}
0

I rewrote devinmoore's method that performs sorting a map by it's value without using Iterator :

public static Map<K, V> sortMapByValue(Map<K, V> inputMap) {

    Set<Entry<K, V>> set = inputMap.entrySet();
    List<Entry<K, V>> list = new ArrayList<Entry<K, V>>(set);

    Collections.sort(list, new Comparator<Map.Entry<K, V>>()
    {
        @Override
        public int compare(Entry<K, V> o1, Entry<K, V> o2) {
            return (o1.getValue()).compareTo( o2.getValue() );  //Ascending order
        }
    } );

    Map<K, V> sortedMap = new LinkedHashMap<>();

    for(Map.Entry<K, V> entry : list){
        sortedMap.put(entry.getKey(), entry.getValue());
    }

    return sortedMap;
}

Note: that we used LinkedHashMap as output map, because our list has been sorted by value and now we should store our list into output map with order of inserted key,values. So if you use for example TreeMap as your output map, your map will be sorted by map keys again!

This is the main method:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<>();
    map.put("3", "three");
    map.put("1", "one");
    map.put("5", "five");
    System.out.println("Input Map:" + map);
    System.out.println("Sorted Map:" + sortMapByValue(map));
}

Finally, this is the output:

Input Map:{1=one, 3=three, 5=five}
Sorted Map:{5=five, 1=one, 3=three}
0

If there is a preference of having a Map data structure that inherently sorts by values without having to trigger any sort methods or explicitly pass to a utility, then the following solutions may be applicable:

(1) org.drools.chance.core.util.ValueSortedMap (JBoss project) maintains two maps internally one for lookup and one for maintaining the sorted values. Quite similar to previously added answers, but probably it is the abstraction and encapsulation part (including copying mechanism) that makes it safer to use from the outside.

(2) http://techblog.molindo.at/2008/11/java-map-sorted-by-value.html avoids maintaining two maps and instead relies/extends from Apache Common's LinkedMap. (Blog author's note: as all the code here is in the public domain):

// required to access LinkEntry.before and LinkEntry.after
package org.apache.commons.collections.map;

// SNIP: imports

/**
* map implementation based on LinkedMap that maintains a sorted list of
* values for iteration
*/
public class ValueSortedHashMap extends LinkedMap {
    private final boolean _asc;

    // don't use super()!
    public ValueSortedHashMap(final boolean asc) {
        super(DEFAULT_CAPACITY);
        _asc = asc;
    }

    // SNIP: some more constructors with initial capacity and the like

    protected void addEntry(final HashEntry entry, final int hashIndex) {
        final LinkEntry link = (LinkEntry) entry;
        insertSorted(link);
        data[hashIndex] = entry;
    }

    protected void updateEntry(final HashEntry entry, final Object newValue) {
        entry.setValue(newValue);
        final LinkEntry link = (LinkEntry) entry;
        link.before.after = link.after;
        link.after.before = link.before;
        link.after = link.before = null;
        insertSorted(link);
    }

    private void insertSorted(final LinkEntry link) {
        LinkEntry cur = header;
        // iterate whole list, could (should?) be replaced with quicksearch
        // start at end to optimize speed for in-order insertions
        while ((cur = cur.before) != header & amp; & amp; !insertAfter(cur, link)) {}
        link.after = cur.after;
        link.before = cur;
        cur.after.before = link;
        cur.after = link;
    }

    protected boolean insertAfter(final LinkEntry cur, final LinkEntry link) {
        if (_asc) {
            return ((Comparable) cur.getValue())
            .compareTo((V) link.getValue()) & lt; = 0;
        } else {
            return ((Comparable) cur.getValue())
            .compareTo((V) link.getValue()) & gt; = 0;
        }
    }

    public boolean isAscending() {
        return _asc;
    }
}

(3) Write a custom Map or extends from LinkedHashMap that will only sort during enumeration (e.g., values(), keyset(), entryset()) as needed. The inner implementation/behavior is abstracted from the one using this class but it appears to the client of this class that values are always sorted when requested for enumeration. This class hopes that sorting will happen mostly once if all put operations have been completed before enumerations. Sorting method adopts some of the previous answers to this question.

public class SortByValueMap<K, V> implements Map<K, V> {

    private boolean isSortingNeeded = false;

    private final Map<K, V> map = new LinkedHashMap<>();

    @Override
    public V put(K key, V value) {
        isSortingNeeded = true;
        return map.put(key, value);
    }

    @Override
    public void putAll(Map<? extends K, ? extends V> map) {
        isSortingNeeded = true;
        map.putAll(map);
    }

    @Override
    public Set<K> keySet() {
        sort();
        return map.keySet();
    }

    @Override
    public Set<Entry<K, V>> entrySet() {
        sort();
        return map.entrySet();
    }

    @Override
    public Collection<V> values() {
        sort();
        return map.values();
    }

    private void sort() {
        if (!isSortingNeeded) {
            return;
        }

        List<Entry<K, V>> list = new ArrayList<>(size());

        for (Iterator<Map.Entry<K, V>> it = map.entrySet().iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
            Map.Entry<K, V> entry = it.next();
            list.add(entry);
            it.remove();
        }

        Collections.sort(list);

        for (Entry<K, V> entry : list) {
            map.put(entry.getKey(), entry.getValue());
        }

        isSortingNeeded = false;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        sort();
        return map.toString();
    }
}

(4) Guava offers ImmutableMap.Builder.orderEntriesByValue(Comparator valueComparator) although the resulting map will be immutable:

Configures this Builder to order entries by value according to the specified comparator.

The sort order is stable, that is, if two entries have values that compare as equivalent, the entry that was inserted first will be first in the built map's iteration order.

-1

For sorting upon the keys I found a better solution with a TreeMap (I will try to get a solution for value based sorting ready too):

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Map<String, String> unsorted = new HashMap<String, String>();
    unsorted.put("Cde", "Cde_Value");
    unsorted.put("Abc", "Abc_Value");
    unsorted.put("Bcd", "Bcd_Value");

    Comparator<String> comparer = new Comparator<String>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
            return o1.compareTo(o2);
        }};

    Map<String, String> sorted = new TreeMap<String, String>(comparer);
    sorted.putAll(unsorted);
    System.out.println(sorted);
}

Output would be:

{Abc=Abc_Value, Bcd=Bcd_Value, Cde=Cde_Value}

  • put all the value in treeMap autometically they'll be sorted by its key using R-B Tree. – sitakant Dec 15 '15 at 11:19
  • The comparator passed to the TreeMap constructor compares the KEYS of the TreeMap instead of the VALUES. In your example, it worked because sorting by keys is the same as sorting by values. The full constructor is: public TreeMap(Comparator<? super K> comparator) Where it accepts decedents of K which is the key. For more refer to: docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/… – Hussein El Motayam Jul 6 '17 at 11:41
-1
public class SortedMapExample {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();

        map.put("Cde", "C");
        map.put("Abc", "A");
        map.put("Cbc", "Z");
        map.put("Dbc", "D");
        map.put("Bcd", "B");
        map.put("sfd", "Bqw");
        map.put("DDD", "Bas");
        map.put("BGG", "Basd");

        System.out.println(sort(map, new Comparator<String>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
                    return o1.compareTo(o2);
            }}));
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public static <K, V> Map<K,V> sort(Map<K, V> in, Comparator<? super V> compare) {
        Map<K, V> result = new LinkedHashMap<K, V>();
        V[] array = (V[])in.values().toArray();
        for(int i=0;i<array.length;i++)
        {

        }
        Arrays.sort(array, compare);
        for (V item : array) {
            K key= (K) getKey(in, item);
            result.put(key, item);
        }
        return result;
    }

    public static <K, V>  Object getKey(Map<K, V> in,V value)
    {
       Set<K> key= in.keySet();
       Iterator<K> keyIterator=key.iterator();
       while (keyIterator.hasNext()) {
           K valueObject = (K) keyIterator.next();
           if(in.get(valueObject).equals(value))
           {
                   return valueObject;
           }
       }
       return null;
   }

}

// Please try here. I am modifing the code for value sort.

  • That's in O(n^2)... – assylias Mar 3 '14 at 17:24
-1
public class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    TreeMap<Integer, String> hm=new TreeMap();
    hm.put(3, "arun singh");
    hm.put(5, "vinay singh");
    hm.put(1, "bandagi singh");
    hm.put(6, "vikram singh");
    hm.put(2, "panipat singh");
    hm.put(28, "jakarta singh");

    ArrayList<String> al=new ArrayList(hm.values());
    Collections.sort(al, new myComparator());

    System.out.println("//sort by values \n");
    for(String obj: al){
        for(Map.Entry<Integer, String> map2:hm.entrySet()){
            if(map2.getValue().equals(obj)){
                System.out.println(map2.getKey()+" "+map2.getValue());
            }
        } 
     }
  }
}

class myComparator implements Comparator{
    @Override
    public int compare(Object o1, Object o2) {
       String o3=(String) o1;
       String o4 =(String) o2;
       return o3.compareTo(o4);
    }   
}

OUTPUT=

//sort by values 

3 arun singh
1 bandagi singh
28 jakarta singh
2 panipat singh
6 vikram singh
5 vinay singh
  • O(N^2) solution. And it will produce spurious results if there are duplicate values. – Stephen C Oct 7 '18 at 1:05
-2

Okay, this version works with two new Map objects and two iterations and sorts on values. Hope, the performs well although the map entries must be looped twice:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Map<String, String> unsorted = new HashMap<String, String>();
    unsorted.put("Cde", "Cde_Value");
    unsorted.put("Abc", "Abc_Value");
    unsorted.put("Bcd", "Bcd_Value");

    Comparator<String> comparer = new Comparator<String>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
            return o1.compareTo(o2);
        }};

    System.out.println(sortByValue(unsorted, comparer));

}

public static <K, V> Map<K,V> sortByValue(Map<K, V> in, Comparator<? super V> compare) {
    Map<V, K> swapped = new TreeMap<V, K>(compare);
    for(Entry<K,V> entry: in.entrySet()) {
        if (entry.getValue() != null) {
            swapped.put(entry.getValue(), entry.getKey());
        }
    }
    LinkedHashMap<K, V> result = new LinkedHashMap<K, V>();
    for(Entry<V,K> entry: swapped.entrySet()) {
        if (entry.getValue() != null) {
            result.put(entry.getValue(), entry.getKey());
        }
    }
    return result;
}

The solution uses a TreeMap with a Comparator and sorts out all null keys and values. First, the ordering functionality from the TreeMap is used to sort upon the values, next the sorted Map is used to create a result as a LinkedHashMap that retains has the same order of values.

Greetz, GHad

  • 1
    Doesn't work with duplicate values. – assylias Mar 3 '14 at 17:19
-2

We simply sort a map just like this

            Map<String, String> unsortedMap = new HashMap<String, String>();

    unsortedMap.put("E", "E Val");
    unsortedMap.put("F", "F Val");
    unsortedMap.put("H", "H Val");
    unsortedMap.put("B", "B Val");
    unsortedMap.put("C", "C Val");
    unsortedMap.put("A", "A Val");
    unsortedMap.put("G", "G Val");
    unsortedMap.put("D", "D Val");

    Map<String, String> sortedMap = new TreeMap<String, String>(unsortedMap);

    System.out.println("\nAfter sorting..");
    for (Map.Entry <String, String> mapEntry : sortedMap.entrySet()) {
        System.out.println(mapEntry.getKey() + " \t" + mapEntry.getValue());
  • 10
    this just creates a treemap, treemaps sort on the key – NimChimpsky Sep 18 '12 at 11:55
-2

If there's not any value bigger than the size of the map, you could use arrays, this should be the fastest approach:

public List<String> getList(Map<String, Integer> myMap) {
    String[] copyArray = new String[myMap.size()];
    for (Entry<String, Integer> entry : myMap.entrySet()) {
        copyArray[entry.getValue()] = entry.getKey();
    }
    return Arrays.asList(copyArray);
}
  • This copyArray[entry.getValue()] is very error-prone, since it will fail, if the map contains values which are larger than the map size. – Tom Dec 15 '15 at 21:57
-2
    static <K extends Comparable<? super K>, V extends Comparable<? super V>>
    Map sortByValueInDescendingOrder(final Map<K, V> map) {
        Map re = new TreeMap(new Comparator<K>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(K o1, K o2) {
                if (map.get(o1) == null || map.get(o2) == null) {
                    return -o1.compareTo(o2);
                }
                int result = -map.get(o1).compareTo(map.get(o2));
                if (result != 0) {
                    return result;
                }
                return -o1.compareTo(o2);
            }
        });
        re.putAll(map);
        return re;
    }
    @Test(timeout = 3000l, expected = Test.None.class)
    public void testSortByValueInDescendingOrder() {
        char[] arr = "googler".toCharArray();
        Map<Character, Integer> charToTimes = new HashMap();
        for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
            Integer times = charToTimes.get(arr[i]);
            charToTimes.put(arr[i], times == null ? 1 : times + 1);
        }
        Map sortedByTimes = sortByValueInDescendingOrder(charToTimes);
        Assert.assertEquals(charToTimes.toString(), "{g=2, e=1, r=1, o=2, l=1}");
        Assert.assertEquals(sortedByTimes.toString(), "{o=2, g=2, r=1, l=1, e=1}");
        Assert.assertEquals(sortedByTimes.containsKey('a'), false);
        Assert.assertEquals(sortedByTimes.get('a'), null);
        Assert.assertEquals(sortedByTimes.get('g'), 2);
        Assert.assertEquals(sortedByTimes.equals(charToTimes), true);
    }
-4

Best thing is to convert HashMap to TreeMap. TreeMap sort keys on its own. If you want to sort on values than quick fix can be you can switch values with keys if your values are not duplicates.

-8

as map is unordered to sort it ,we can do following

Map<String, String> map= new TreeMap<String, String>(unsortMap);

You should note that, unlike a hash map, a tree map guarantees that its elements will be sorted in ascending key order.

  • 8
    This sorts based on keys, not values. – Duncan Jones Apr 15 '14 at 7:29
-9

If your Map values implement Comparable (e.g. String), this should work

Map<Object, String> map = new HashMap<Object, String>();
// Populate the Map
List<String> mapValues = new ArrayList<String>(map.values());
Collections.sort(mapValues);

If the map values themselves don't implement Comparable, but you have an instance of Comparable that can sort them, replace the last line with this:

Collections.sort(mapValues, comparable);
  • 1
    Agreed. Simple and makes sense when compared to other submissions here. I'm not sure why everyone else is suggesting more complicated ways to solve this when Collections already has it done for you. – Aaron Sep 21 '08 at 19:27
  • 19
    The reason is that this doesn't solve the problem. It sorts the values all right, but it throws away the keys. What the question asked for was a way to sort the map, meaning that the keys and values should still be linked. – gregory Oct 20 '08 at 13:22
  • 3
    Won't work because you are just sorting a copy of the values, thus leaving the map untouched. – whiskeysierra Jan 10 '10 at 14:05
-11

Use java.util.TreeMap.

"The map is sorted according to the natural ordering of its keys, or by a Comparator provided at map creation time, depending on which constructor is used."

  • I'd use the SortedMap interface along with the TreeMap. Then you aren't tied to the TreeMap's implementation. – ScArcher2 Sep 20 '08 at 23:45
  • 8
    The documentation is saying TreeMap sorts its keys based on their natural ordering or by a Comparator you provide. But the sorting is based on the keys, not the values. A Comparator that compared the values would give a tree structure the same as using the value as the key in the first place. – benzado Sep 20 '08 at 23:59

protected by Elenasys Jun 17 '15 at 23:08

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