8

Suppose I have a function a:

function a() {
    this.b = 1;
    this.set = setInterval(function() {console.log(this.b);}, 200);
}

So when a.set() is called the anonymous function will be called. But this won't work as this at that time when the function is triggered points to the window object. Also it's not a good idea to use a.b as there may be multiple instances of a.

What is a good solution to this problem?

  • why don't you use apply or call developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… – Deeptechtons Jun 8 '12 at 6:32
  • @Deeptechtons - I don't think apply or call are any use for this problem, but perhaps you could explain what you had in mind in an answer? – nnnnnn Jun 8 '12 at 6:35
  • @nnnnnn Question is definitely a candidate for "How do i change context inside function" sort of question. Which is solved using appy,or call. But might be overkill for this case. – Deeptechtons Jun 8 '12 at 6:41
  • 1
    @Deeptechtons Hmm good suggestion but definitely this problem clearly shouldn't be at that level. – NSF Jun 8 '12 at 6:44
  • @Deeptechtons - What I'm saying is that .call and .apply won't work here - you can't just add them inside the function passed to setInterval because by then this is already the wrong thing. .bind would work though, to set this in the function being passed to setInterval. – nnnnnn Jun 8 '12 at 21:05
18

Store a reference to this:

function a() {
    var self = this;
    self.b = 1;
    self.set = setInterval(function() {console.log(self.b);}, 200);
}

The anonymous function that you pass to setInterval has access to any variables in its containing scope, i.e., any local variables of function a(). The magic of JS closures keeps these variables alive even after a() has completed, and each invocation of a() gets its own closure.

  • Yea I've seen examples like that but that's exactly what makes me confused. Suppose "a" finishes before the event at 200ms gets triggered, the variable self seems that it should be destroyed at that time. If not, then when it would be destroyed? after the interval gets cleared? – NSF Jun 8 '12 at 6:42
  • 1
    As I mentioned in my answer, an inner function has access to variables in the scope of its containing function even after the containing function is finished. In this case setInterval continues to hold a reference to the inner function so it can keep calling it even after a() has finished; until the interval is cleared that reference will stay alive and the variables will stay alive. Note that a() will definitely finish before the interval gets triggered (no matter how short the interval) because JS runs on a single thread. Google "JavaScript closures" for more info. – nnnnnn Jun 8 '12 at 21:17
  • make sense. Thanks. – NSF Jun 10 '12 at 8:29
  • This works when "this" var is a JS class (like in ReactJS), too, and not just a dom element. – HoldOffHunger Aug 18 '17 at 15:04
  • Not sure why but inside the interval function self switches back to the window object? – Shane Dec 13 '17 at 23:03
6

This would be the cleanest solution, since most of the time you actually want to switch the this context for your consecutive method calls:

    // store scope reference for our delegating method
    var that = this;
    setInterval(function() {
        // this would be changed here because of method scope, 
        // but we still have a reference to that
        OURMETHODNAME.call(that);
    }, 200);
5

Since we have ES6 now, I think we need another answer here:

Use an arrow function:

function a() {
  this.b = 1;
  this.set = setInterval(() => {console.log(this.b);}, 200);
}

Arrow functions, opposite to normal functions, don't have a this context on their own. This means you have access to the outer this.

  • 1
    ES6 has reduced my syntax to almost nothing, once again! Thanks! – HoldOffHunger Aug 18 '17 at 15:07
2

Just save your this reference in some other variable, that is not overridden by the window-call later on. Later you can use that variable to reference he object you started with.

function a() {
    this.b = 1;
    var that = this;
    this.set = setInterval(function() {console.log(that.b);}, 200);
}
0

In your case, you can simply:

function a() {
    var _this = this;
    this.b = 1;
    this.set = setInterval(function () {
      console.log(_this.b);
    }, 200);
}

Normally, we can also have a helper method Function.prototype.bind to fix the this reference.

0

This question is waay too old, but I did not like the solutions in here as the idea has mostly been about attaching the instance to something public.

Here is another, working idea:

The problem is that when calling as a callback from an interval, the scope is not inside this. However, you can kinda force it to be by defining a Function variable.

function a() {
  var localCallback: () => {
    // access `this` as you will
    console.log(this);
  };
  this.timer = setInterval( localCallback, this.saveInterval );
}

Hope this is helpful!

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