Assuming that I have a typedef declared in my .h file as such:

typedef enum {
  JSON,
  XML,
  Atom,
  RSS
} FormatType;

I would like to build a function that converts the numeric value of the typedef to a string. For example, if the message [self toString:JSON] was sent; it would return 'JSON'.

The function would look something like this:

-(NSString *) toString:(FormatType)formatType {
  //need help here
  return [];
}

Incidentally, if I try this syntax

[self toString:FormatType.JSON];

to pass the typedef value to the method, I get an error. What am I missing?

20 Answers 20

up vote 123 down vote accepted

This is really a C question, not specific to Objective-C (which is a superset of the C language). Enums in C are represented as integers. So you need to write a function that returns a string given an enum value. There are many ways to do this. An array of strings such that the enum value can be used as an index into the array or a map structure (e.g. an NSDictionary) that maps an enum value to a string work, but I find that these approaches are not as clear as a function that makes the conversion explicit (and the array approach, although the classic C way is dangerous if your enum values are not continguous from 0). Something like this would work:

- (NSString*)formatTypeToString:(FormatType)formatType {
    NSString *result = nil;

    switch(formatType) {
        case JSON:
            result = @"JSON";
            break;
        case XML:
            result = @"XML";
            break;
        case Atom:
            result = @"Atom";
            break;
        case RSS:
            result = @"RSS";
            break;
        default:
            [NSException raise:NSGenericException format:@"Unexpected FormatType."];
    }

    return result;
}

Your related question about the correct syntax for an enum value is that you use just the value (e.g. JSON), not the FormatType.JSON sytax. FormatType is a type and the enum values (e.g. JSON, XML, etc.) are values that you can assign to that type.

You can't do it easily. In C and Objective-C, enums are really just glorified integer constants. You'll have to generate a table of names yourself (or with some preprocessor abuse). For example:

// In a header file
typedef enum FormatType {
    JSON,
    XML,
    Atom,
    RSS
} FormatType;

extern NSString * const FormatType_toString[];

// In a source file
// initialize arrays with explicit indices to make sure 
// the string match the enums properly
NSString * const FormatType_toString[] = {
    [JSON] = @"JSON",
    [XML] = @"XML",
    [Atom] = @"Atom",
    [RSS] = @"RSS"
};
...
// To convert enum to string:
NSString *str = FormatType_toString[theEnumValue];

The danger of this approach is that if you ever change the enum, you have to remember to change the array of names. You can solve this problem with some preprocessor abuse, but it's tricky and ugly.

Also note that this assumes you have a valid enum constant. If you have an integer value from an untrusted source, you additionally need to do a check that your constant is valid, e.g. by including a "past max" value in your enum, or by checking if it's less than the array length, sizeof(FormatType_toString) / sizeof(FormatType_toString[0]).

  • 37
    you can initialize arrays with explicit indices, eg string[] = { [XML] = "XML" } to make sure the string match the enums properly – Christoph Jul 7 '09 at 23:39
  • @Christoph: Yes, that's a C99 feature called designated initializers. That's fine to use in Objective-C (which is based off of C99), but for generic C89 code, you can't use those. – Adam Rosenfield Sep 3 '13 at 17:55
  • Is there any way to go the other way? For example, get the enum back given a string? – Jameo Feb 17 '14 at 16:44
  • 1
    @Jameo: Yes, but it's not quite as simple as doing an array lookup. You'll either need to iterate through the FormatType_toString[] array and call -isEqualToString: on each element to find a match, or use a mapping data type such as NSDictionary to maintain the inverse lookup map. – Adam Rosenfield Feb 17 '14 at 16:55
  • 1
    The trick of Max O is good about forgetting to add entries in the FormatType_toString array. – AechoLiu Dec 15 '15 at 2:47

My solution:

edit: I've added even a better solution at the end, using Modern Obj-C

1.
Put names as keys in an array.
Make sure the indexes are the appropriate enums, and in the right order (otherwise exception).
note: names is a property synthesized as *_names*;

code was not checked for compilation, but I used the same technique in my app.

typedef enum {
  JSON,
  XML,
  Atom,
  RSS
} FormatType;

+ (NSArray *)names
{
    static NSMutableArray * _names = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        _names = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:4];
        [_names insertObject:@"JSON" atIndex:JSON];
        [_names insertObject:@"XML" atIndex:XML];
        [_names insertObject:@"Atom" atIndex:Atom];
        [_names insertObject:@"RSS" atIndex:RSS];
    });

    return _names;
}

+ (NSString *)nameForType:(FormatType)type
{
    return [[self names] objectAtIndex:type];
}


//

2.
Using Modern Obj-C you we can use a dictionary to tie descriptions to keys in the enum.
Order DOES NOT matter.

typedef NS_ENUM(NSUInteger, UserType) {
    UserTypeParent = 0,
    UserTypeStudent = 1,
    UserTypeTutor = 2,
    UserTypeUnknown = NSUIntegerMax
};  

@property (nonatomic) UserType type;

+ (NSDictionary *)typeDisplayNames
{
    return @{@(UserTypeParent) : @"Parent",
             @(UserTypeStudent) : @"Student",
             @(UserTypeTutor) : @"Tutor",
             @(UserTypeUnknown) : @"Unknown"};
}

- (NSString *)typeDisplayName
{
    return [[self class] typeDisplayNames][@(self.type)];
}


Usage (in a class instance method):

NSLog(@"%@", [self typeDisplayName]);


  • 11
    Do be aware that every time you call +[typeDisplayNames], you're re-creating the dictionary. This is fine if it's only called a few times, but if it's called many times, this will get very expensive. A better solution may be to make the dictionary a singleton, so it's only created once and stays in memory otherwise. Classic memory vs. CPU conundrum. – Joel Fischer Apr 11 '14 at 14:24
  • Or change it to be a static variable, e.g. static NSDictionary *dict = nil; if(!dict) dict = @{@(UserTypeParent): @"Parent"}; return dict; Comments won't let you line break, sorry for that. – natanavra Jun 29 '17 at 14:44

Combining @AdamRosenfield answer, @Christoph comment and another trick to handle plain C enums I suggest:

// In a header file
typedef enum {
  JSON = 0,         // explicitly indicate starting index
  XML,
  Atom,
  RSS,

  FormatTypeCount,  // keep track of the enum size automatically
} FormatType;
extern NSString *const FormatTypeName[FormatTypeCount];


// In a source file
NSString *const FormatTypeName[FormatTypeCount] = {
  [JSON] = @"JSON",
  [XML] = @"XML",
  [Atom] = @"Atom",
  [RSS] = @"RSS",
};


// Usage
NSLog(@"%@", FormatTypeName[XML]);

In the worst case - like if you change the enum but forget to change the names array - it will return nil for this key.

define typedef enum in class header:

typedef enum {
    IngredientType_text  = 0,
    IngredientType_audio = 1,
    IngredientType_video = 2,
    IngredientType_image = 3
} IngredientType;

write a method like this in class:

+ (NSString*)typeStringForType:(IngredientType)_type {
   NSString *key = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"IngredientType_%i", _type];
   return NSLocalizedString(key, nil);
}

have the strings inside Localizable.strings file:

/* IngredientType_text */
"IngredientType_0" = "Text";
/* IngredientType_audio */
"IngredientType_1" = "Audio";
/* IngredientType_video */
"IngredientType_2" = "Video";
/* IngredientType_image */
"IngredientType_3" = "Image";

I would use the compiler's # string token (along with macros to make it all more compact):

#define ENUM_START              \
            NSString* ret;      \
            switch(value) {

#define ENUM_CASE(evalue)       \
            case evalue:        \
                ret = @#evalue; \
                break;

#define ENUM_END                \
            }                   \
            return ret;

NSString*
_CvtCBCentralManagerStateToString(CBCentralManagerState value)
{
    ENUM_START
        ENUM_CASE(CBCentralManagerStateUnknown)
        ENUM_CASE(CBCentralManagerStateResetting)
        ENUM_CASE(CBCentralManagerStateUnsupported)
        ENUM_CASE(CBCentralManagerStateUnauthorized)
        ENUM_CASE(CBCentralManagerStatePoweredOff)
        ENUM_CASE(CBCentralManagerStatePoweredOn)
    ENUM_END
}
  • This worked great in C99 - I'm new at C, and I found this to be the cleanest way to accomplish the question asked. I also added in a default in my implementation for items that may not have been defined. Very clean method. Thanks for the results. Very crafty use of a Macro. – TravisWhidden May 18 '16 at 16:11

I like the #define way of doing this:

// Place this in your .h file, outside the @interface block

typedef enum {
    JPG,
    PNG,
    GIF,
    PVR
} kImageType;
#define kImageTypeArray @"JPEG", @"PNG", @"GIF", @"PowerVR", nil

// Place this in the .m file, inside the @implementation block
// A method to convert an enum to string
-(NSString*) imageTypeEnumToString:(kImageType)enumVal
{
    NSArray *imageTypeArray = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:kImageTypeArray];
    return [imageTypeArray objectAtIndex:enumVal];
}

source (source no longer available)

  • 3
    too fragile and too fatal if called with wrong value – Daij-Djan Jun 16 '13 at 19:10
  • @Daij-Djan what about returning nil if array.count <= enumValue? – anneblue Mar 14 '14 at 10:13
  • @anneblue that would catch the error .. it would sill be fragile because if you add an enum value OR the integer value of an enum value changes this goes wrong. The accepted answer would be good – Daij-Djan Mar 14 '14 at 12:18
  • link not found ;-( – codercat May 20 '14 at 6:33
  • 1
    I like this answer best, because you have the string definitions right next to the enums. Least chance of missing a value. And @Ganesh, to convert from raw value, could do this: return (kImageType)[imageTypeArray indexOfObject:rawValue]; – Harris Jan 4 '15 at 7:38

I made a sort of mix of all solutions found on this page to create mine, it's a kind of object oriented enum extension or something.

In fact if you need more than just constants (i.e. integers), you probably need a model object (We're all talking about MVC, right?)

Just ask yourself the question before using this, am I right, don't you, in fact, need a real model object, initialized from a webservice, a plist, an SQLite database or CoreData ?

Anyway here comes the code (MPI is for "My Project Initials", everybody use this or their name, it seems) :

MyWonderfulType.h :

typedef NS_ENUM(NSUInteger, MPIMyWonderfulType) {
    MPIMyWonderfulTypeOne = 1,
    MPIMyWonderfulTypeTwo = 2,
    MPIMyWonderfulTypeGreen = 3,
    MPIMyWonderfulTypeYellow = 4,
    MPIMyWonderfulTypePumpkin = 5
};

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface MyWonderfulType : NSObject

+ (NSString *)displayNameForWonderfulType:(MPIMyWonderfulType)wonderfulType;
+ (NSString *)urlForWonderfulType:(MPIMyWonderfulType)wonderfulType;

@end

And MyWonderfulType.m :

#import "MyWonderfulType.h"

@implementation MyWonderfulType

+ (NSDictionary *)myWonderfulTypeTitles
{
    return @{
             @(MPIMyWonderfulTypeOne) : @"One",
             @(MPIMyWonderfulTypeTwo) : @"Two",
             @(MPIMyWonderfulTypeGreen) : @"Green",
             @(MPIMyWonderfulTypeYellow) : @"Yellow",
             @(MPIMyWonderfulTypePumpkin) : @"Pumpkin"
             };
}

+ (NSDictionary *)myWonderfulTypeURLs
{
    return @{
             @(MPIMyWonderfulTypeOne) : @"http://www.theone.com",
             @(MPIMyWonderfulTypeTwo) : @"http://www.thetwo.com",
             @(MPIMyWonderfulTypeGreen) : @"http://www.thegreen.com",
             @(MPIMyWonderfulTypeYellow) : @"http://www.theyellow.com",
             @(MPIMyWonderfulTypePumpkin) : @"http://www.thepumpkin.com"
             };
}

+ (NSString *)displayNameForWonderfulType:(MPIMyWonderfulType)wonderfulType {
    return [MPIMyWonderfulType myWonderfulTypeTitles][@(wonderfulType)];
}

+ (NSString *)urlForWonderfulType:(MPIMyWonderfulType)wonderfulType {
    return [MPIMyWonderfulType myWonderfulTypeURLs][@(wonderfulType)];
}


@end
  • looks nice, but you are allocating and returning full dictionaries when you only need one of its values. Efficiency VS Pretty code? depends on what you want and you will be fine with this if you don't use them that much on your code like in a huge loop. But this will be maybe useful with "dynamic" or non-hard-coded enums coming from a server for example – user2387149 Jul 10 '15 at 20:35

Improved @yar1vn answer by dropping string dependency:

#define VariableName(arg) (@""#arg)

typedef NS_ENUM(NSUInteger, UserType) {
    UserTypeParent = 0,
    UserTypeStudent = 1,
    UserTypeTutor = 2,
    UserTypeUnknown = NSUIntegerMax
};  

@property (nonatomic) UserType type;

+ (NSDictionary *)typeDisplayNames
{
    return @{@(UserTypeParent) : VariableName(UserTypeParent),
             @(UserTypeStudent) : VariableName(UserTypeStudent),
             @(UserTypeTutor) : VariableName(UserTypeTutor),
             @(UserTypeUnknown) : VariableName(UserTypeUnknown)};
}

- (NSString *)typeDisplayName
{
    return [[self class] typeDisplayNames][@(self.type)];
}

Thus when you'll change enum entry name corresponding string will be changed. Useful in case if you are not going to show this string to user.

  • Can you explain "-- define VariableName(arg) (@""#arg) --- and probably give a better solution ? – xySVerma Jun 5 '14 at 7:44
  • With #defines, when you use # for a substitution, the argument is automatically wrapped in double quotes. In C, when two strings appear next to each other in code like "foo""bar", it results in the string "foobar" when compiled. So, #define VariableName(arg) (@""#arg) will expand VariableName(MyEnum) to be (@"""MyEnum"). That will result in the string @"MyEnum". – Chris Douglass Jul 28 '17 at 19:58

Another solution:

typedef enum BollettinoMavRavTypes {
    AMZCartServiceOperationCreate,
    AMZCartServiceOperationAdd,
    AMZCartServiceOperationGet,
    AMZCartServiceOperationModify
} AMZCartServiceOperation;

#define AMZCartServiceOperationValue(operation) [[[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects: @"CartCreate", @"CartAdd", @"CartGet", @"CartModify", nil] objectAtIndex: operation];

In your method you can use:

NSString *operationCheck = AMZCartServiceOperationValue(operation);

I had a large enumerated type I wanted to convert it into an NSDictionary lookup. I ended up using sed from OSX terminal as:

$ sed -E 's/^[[:space:]]{1,}([[:alnum:]]{1,}).*$/  @(\1) : @"\1",/g' ObservationType.h

which can be read as: 'capture the first word on the line and output @(word) : @"word",'

This regex converts the enum in a header file named 'ObservationType.h' which contains:

typedef enum : int { 
    ObservationTypePulse = 1,
    ObservationTypeRespRate = 2,
    ObservationTypeTemperature = 3,
    .
    .
}

into something like:

    @(ObservationTypePulse) : @"ObservationTypePulse",
    @(ObservationTypeRespRate) : @"ObservationTypeRespRate",
    @(ObservationTypeTemperature) : @"ObservationTypeTemperature",
    .
    .

which can then be wrapped in a method using modern objective-c syntax @{ } (as explained by @yar1vn above) to create a NSDictionary lookup :

-(NSDictionary *)observationDictionary
{
    static NSDictionary *observationDictionary;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        observationDictionary = [[NSDictionary alloc] initWithDictionary:@{
                                 @(ObservationTypePulse) : @"ObservationTypePulse",
                                 @(ObservationTypeRespRate) : @"ObservationTypeRespRate",
                                 .
                                 .
                                 }];
    });
    return observationDictionary;
}

The dispatch_once boiler-plate is just to ensure that the static variable is initialised in a thread-safe manner.

Note: I found the sed regex expression on OSX odd - when I tried to use + to match 'one or more' it didn't work and had to resort to using {1,} as a replacement

I use a variation on Barry Walk's answer, that in order of importance:

  1. Allows the compiler to check for missing case clauses (it can't if you have a default clause).
  2. Uses an Objective-C typical name (rather than a Java like name).
  3. Raises a specific exception.
  4. Is shorter.

EG:

- (NSString*)describeFormatType:(FormatType)formatType {    
    switch(formatType) {
        case JSON:
            return @"JSON";
        case XML:
            return @"XML";
        case Atom:
            return @"Atom";
        case RSS:
            return @"RSS";
    }
    [NSException raise:NSInvalidArgumentException format:@"The given format type number, %ld, is not known.", formatType];
    return nil; // Keep the compiler happy - does not understand above line never returns!
}

@pixel added the most brilliant answer here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/24255387/1364257 Please, upvote him!

He uses the neat X macro from the 1960's. (I've changed his code a bit for the modern ObjC)

#define X(a, b, c) a b,
enum ZZObjectType {
    XXOBJECTTYPE_TABLE
};
typedef NSUInteger TPObjectType;
#undef X

#define XXOBJECTTYPE_TABLE \
X(ZZObjectTypeZero, = 0, @"ZZObjectTypeZero") \
X(ZZObjectTypeOne, , @"ZZObjectTypeOne") \
X(ZZObjectTypeTwo, , @"ZZObjectTypeTwo") \
X(ZZObjectTypeThree, , @"ZZObjectTypeThree")

+ (NSString*)nameForObjectType:(ZZObjectType)objectType {
#define X(a, b, c) @(a):c, 
    NSDictionary *dict = @{XXOBJECTTYPE_TABLE};
#undef X
    return dict[objectType];
}

That's it. Clean and neat. Thanks to @pixel! https://stackoverflow.com/users/21804/pixel

  • 1
    Thanks for the answer, but we have a different definition of clean.. – Alexandre G Nov 16 '16 at 7:29
  • @AlexandreG provide your solution, man. It's easy to carp at someone. This solution has its obvious pros and obvious cons both. Make the world better with your solution. – voiger Nov 17 '16 at 9:44

I combined several approaches here. I like the idea of the preprocessor and the indexed list.

There's no extra dynamic allocation, and because of the inlining the compiler might be able to optimize the lookup.

typedef NS_ENUM(NSUInteger, FormatType) { FormatTypeJSON = 0, FormatTypeXML, FormatTypeAtom, FormatTypeRSS, FormatTypeCount };

NS_INLINE NSString *FormatTypeToString(FormatType t) {
  if (t >= FormatTypeCount)
    return nil;

#define FormatTypeMapping(value) [value] = @#value

  NSString *table[FormatTypeCount] = {FormatTypeMapping(FormatTypeJSON),
                                      FormatTypeMapping(FormatTypeXML),
                                      FormatTypeMapping(FormatTypeAtom),
                                      FormatTypeMapping(FormatTypeRSS)};

#undef FormatTypeMapping

  return table[t];
}

First of all, with regards to FormatType.JSON: JSON is not a member of FormatType, it's a possible value of the type. FormatType isn't even a composite type — it's a scalar.

Second, the only way to do this is to create a mapping table. The more common way to do this in Objective-C is to create a series of constants referring to your "symbols", so you'd have NSString *FormatTypeJSON = @"JSON" and so on.

the following provides a solution such that to add a new enum requires only a one-line edit, similar work to adding a single line in an enum {} list.

//------------------------------------------------------------------------------
// enum to string example
#define FOR_EACH_GENDER(tbd) \
        tbd(GENDER_MALE) \
        tbd(GENDER_FEMALE) \
        tbd(GENDER_INTERSEX) \

#define ONE_GENDER_ENUM(name) name,
enum
{
    FOR_EACH_GENDER(ONE_GENDER_ENUM)
    MAX_GENDER
};

#define ONE_GENDER(name) #name,
static const char *enumGENDER_TO_STRING[] = 
{
    FOR_EACH_GENDER(ONE_GENDER)
};

// access string name with enumGENDER_TO_STRING[value]
// or, to be safe converting from a untrustworthy caller
static const char *enumGenderToString(unsigned int value)
{
    if (value < MAX_GENDER)
    {
        return enumGENDER_TO_STRING[value];
    }
    return NULL;
}

static void printAllGenders(void)
{
    for (int ii = 0;  ii < MAX_GENDER;  ii++)
    {
        printf("%d) gender %s\n", ii, enumGENDER_TO_STRING[ii]);
    }
}

//------------------------------------------------------------------------------
// you can assign an arbitrary value and/or information to each enum,
#define FOR_EACH_PERSON(tbd) \
        tbd(2, PERSON_FRED,     "Fred",     "Weasley", GENDER_MALE,   12) \
        tbd(4, PERSON_GEORGE,   "George",   "Weasley", GENDER_MALE,   12) \
        tbd(6, PERSON_HARRY,    "Harry",    "Potter",  GENDER_MALE,   10) \
        tbd(8, PERSON_HERMIONE, "Hermione", "Granger", GENDER_FEMALE, 10) \

#define ONE_PERSON_ENUM(value, ename, first, last, gender, age) ename = value,
enum
{
    FOR_EACH_PERSON(ONE_PERSON_ENUM)
};

typedef struct PersonInfoRec
{
    int value;
    const char *ename;
    const char *first;
    const char *last;
    int gender;
    int age;
} PersonInfo;

#define ONE_PERSON_INFO(value, ename, first, last, gender, age) \
                     { ename, #ename, first, last, gender, age },
static const PersonInfo personInfo[] = 
{
    FOR_EACH_PERSON(ONE_PERSON_INFO)
    { 0, NULL, NULL, NULL, 0, 0 }
};
// note: if the enum values are not sequential, you need another way to lookup
// the information besides personInfo[ENUM_NAME]

static void printAllPersons(void)
{
    for (int ii = 0;  ;  ii++)
    {
        const PersonInfo *pPI = &personInfo[ii];
        if (!pPI->ename)
        {
            break;
        }
        printf("%d) enum %-15s  %8s %-8s %13s %2d\n",
            pPI->value, pPI->ename, pPI->first, pPI->last,
            enumGenderToString(pPI->gender), pPI->age);
    }
}
  • This technique is called X-Macro, in case someone wants to read about it. That comes from the fact that, traditionally, the FOR_EACH_GENDER() macro was always just called X(). One thing you may want to do is #undef FOR_EACH_GENDER before you redefine it with a new meaning. – uliwitness Mar 22 '17 at 16:56

Given an enum definition like:

typedef NS_ENUM(NSInteger, AssetIdentifier) {
    Isabella,
    William,
    Olivia
};

We can define a macro to convert an enum value to its corresponding string, as shown below.

#define AssetIdentifier(asset) \
^(AssetIdentifier identifier) { \
switch (identifier) { \
case asset: \
default: \
return @#asset; \
} \
}(asset)

The switch statement used in the block is for type checking, and also to get the auto-complete support in Xcode.

enter image description here enter image description here

Many answers all fairly good.

If you are after a generic, Objective C solution that uses some macros...

Key feature is it uses the enum as an index into a static array of NSString constants. the array itself is wrapped into a function to make it more like the suite of NSStringFromXXX functions prevalent in the Apple APIs.

you will need to #import "NSStringFromEnum.h" found here http://pastebin.com/u83RR3Vk

[EDIT] also needs #import "SW+Variadic.h" found here http://pastebin.com/UEqTzYLf

Example 1 : completely define a NEW enum typedef, with string converters.

in myfile.h


 #import "NSStringFromEnum.h"

 #define define_Dispatch_chain_cmd(enum)\
 enum(chain_done,=0)\
 enum(chain_entry)\
 enum(chain_bg)\
 enum(chain_mt)\
 enum(chain_alt)\
 enum(chain_for_c)\
 enum(chain_while)\
 enum(chain_continue_for)\
 enum(chain_continue_while)\
 enum(chain_break_for)\
 enum(chain_break_while)\
 enum(chain_previous)\
 enum(chain_if)\
 enum(chain_else)\


interface_NSString_Enum_DefinitionAndConverters(Dispatch_chain_cmd)

in myfile.m:


 #import "myfile.h"

 implementation_NSString_Enum_Converters(Dispatch_chain_cmd)

to use :

NSString *NSStringFromEnumDispatch_chain_cmd(enum Dispatch_chain_cmd value);

NSStringFromEnumDispatch_chain_cmd(chain_for_c) returns @"chain_for_c"

  enum Dispatch_chain_cmd enumDispatch_chain_cmdFromNSString(NSString *value);

enumDispatch_chain_cmdFromNSString(@"chain_previous") returns chain_previous

Example 2: provide conversion routines for an existing enum also demonstrates using a settings string, and renaming the typename used in the functions.

in myfile.h


 #import "NSStringFromEnum.h"


 #define CAEdgeAntialiasingMask_SETTINGS_PARAMS CAEdgeAntialiasingMask,mask,EdgeMask,edgeMask

 interface_NSString_Enum_Converters(CAEdgeAntialiasingMask_SETTINGS_PARAMS)

in myfile.m:


 // we can put this in the .m file as we are not defining a typedef, just the strings.
 #define define_CAEdgeAntialiasingMask(enum)\
 enum(kCALayerLeftEdge)\
 enum(kCALayerRightEdge)\
 enum(kCALayerBottomEdge)\
 enum(kCALayerTopEdge)



 implementation_NSString_Enum_Converters(CAEdgeAntialiasingMask_SETTINGS_PARAMS)

Here is working -> https://github.com/ndpiparava/ObjcEnumString

//1st Approach
#define enumString(arg) (@""#arg)

//2nd Approach

+(NSString *)secondApproach_convertEnumToString:(StudentProgressReport)status {

    char *str = calloc(sizeof(kgood)+1, sizeof(char));
    int  goodsASInteger = NSSwapInt((unsigned int)kgood);
    memcpy(str, (const void*)&goodsASInteger, sizeof(goodsASInteger));
    NSLog(@"%s", str);
    NSString *enumString = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:str];
    free(str);

    return enumString;
}

//Third Approcah to enum to string
NSString *const kNitin = @"Nitin";
NSString *const kSara = @"Sara";


typedef NS_ENUM(NSUInteger, Name) {
    NameNitin,
    NameSara,
};

+ (NSString *)thirdApproach_convertEnumToString :(Name)weekday {

    __strong NSString **pointer = (NSString **)&kNitin;
    pointer +=weekday;
    return *pointer;
}

Depending on your needs, you could alternatively use compiler directives to simulate the behaviour you are looking for.

 #define JSON @"JSON"
 #define XML @"XML"
 #define Atom @"Atom"
 #define RSS @"RSS"

Just remember the usual compiler shortcomings, (not type safe, direct copy-paste makes source file larger)

  • 8
    I don't think this will work; anywhere the #define is visible, you won't be able to use the actual enum value (i.e. JSON will get replaced with @"JSON" by the preprocessor and will result in a compiler error when assigning to a FormatType. – Barry Wark Jul 12 '11 at 18:22

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