19

The problem

If the element has multiple classes then it will not match with the regular property value checking, so I'm looking for the best way to check if the object has a particular class in the element's className property.

Example

// element's classname is 'hello world helloworld'
var element = document.getElementById('element');

// this obviously fails
if(element.className == 'hello'){ ... }

// this is not good if the className is just 'helloworld' because it will match
if(element.className.indexOf('hello') != -1){ ... }  

So what would be the best way to do this?

just pure javascript please

37
function hasClass( elem, klass ) {
     return (" " + elem.className + " " ).indexOf( " "+klass+" " ) > -1;
}
  • 7
    This is how jQuery's hasClass works behind the scenes. – ajm Jun 9 '12 at 11:26
  • awesome idea! and it's very short! – Adam Jun 9 '12 at 11:28
  • 3
    Pretty sure jQuery's version normalizes the space separators in the .className value first. This could fail if a tab or some other space character was used to separate the classes. – the system Mar 4 '13 at 18:06
25

In modern browsers, you can use classList:

if (element.classList.contains("hello")) {
   // do something
}  

In the browser that doesn't implement classList but exposes the DOM's prototype, you can use the shim showed in the link.

Otherwise, you can use the same shim's code to have a generic function without manipulate the prototype.

0

You ask for pure javascript, so this is how jQuery implement it:

    hasClass: function( selector ) {
        var className = " " + selector + " ",
            i = 0,
            l = this.length;
        for ( ; i < l; i++ ) {
            if ( this[i].nodeType === 1 && (" " + this[i].className + " ").replace(rclass, " ").indexOf( className ) > -1 ) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    },

rclass is a regular expression of [\n\t\r], to ensure that alternative methods of delimiting class names are not an issue. this would be jQuery's reference to the object(s) and in a sense it makes the code more complicated than required, but it should make sense without knowing the details of it.

  • 1
    Did you, by any chance, copied this from jQuery? what does this refer to? where is rclass defined? – Salman A Jun 9 '12 at 11:29
  • I mention in my comment quite clearly that yes, it comes from jQuery. You raise a good point about rclass, I didn't notice it, I'll update the answer – Steve Jun 9 '12 at 11:43
0

This should work for you:

var a = [];
function getElementsByClassName(classname, node)  {
    if(!node) node = document.getElementsByTagName("body")[0];

    var re = new RegExp('\\b' + classname + '\\b');
    var els = node.getElementsByTagName("*");
    for(var i=0, j=els.length; i<j; i++)
        if(re.test(els[i].className)) a.push(els[i]);
        return a;
}

getElementsByClassName('wrapper');
for (var i=0; i< a.length; i++) {
    console.log(a[i].className);
}

This code will traverse the DOM and search for classes defined as parameter in the main function.Then it will test each founded class elements with a regexp pattern. If it founds will push to an array, and will output the results.

0

this 2018 use ES6

const hasClass = (el, className) => el.classList.contains(className);

How to use

hasClass(document.querySelector('div.active'), 'active'); // true
-1

First, split the className by using the " " character, then check the index of the class you want to find.

function hasClass(element, clazz) {
    return element.className.split(" ").indexOf(clazz) > -1;
}
  • Won't work out of the box in IE8 and below though (indexOf is not supported for arrays). – Felix Kling Jun 9 '12 at 11:37
  • Ok, thanks for this information :) – Rodolphe BELOUIN Jun 9 '12 at 11:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.