14

I have never understood what a nested transaction is good for. Committing a nested transaction commits nothing - it just decreases @@TRANCOUNT. And ROLLBACK rollbacks everything.

BEGIN TRANSACTION
   //do an update
   BEGIN TRANSACTION
     //do an insert
   COMMIT TRANSACTION
COMMIT TRANSACTION

What is the difference with this:

BEGIN TRANSACTION
     //do an update
     //do an insert
COMMIT TRANSACTION

Please give me an example why should nested transactions be used and how they make a difference.

Regards, Petar

9

Nested transactions allows your code to call other code (SPs for instance) which uses transactions itself without actually committing your transaction when they commit.

That said, you can use safepoints to roll back inside of a transaction.

There's a CodeProject article dedicated to that.

  • I can use safepoints without using nested transactions. The stored procedure is a good point(I have never thought of that). But if I don't use a stored procedure in my transaction(or don't call other code), why should I need nested transactions? I constantly see examples with nested transactions and I don't see the point of them. – Petar Minchev Jun 9 '12 at 11:52
  • So are nested transactions useful only when calling external transactional code? – Petar Minchev Jun 9 '12 at 11:56
  • 1
    I agree with you and I think that they are useful for calling external transactional code. The technical ability of SQL Server to handle nested transactions is important and not available in all DB systems. There are some cases (such as with the mentioned SPs - where you should also use SET XACT_ABORT ON) where they may nest "naturally". I never used explicit nested transactions either. – Lucero Jun 9 '12 at 11:57
  • Thanks a bunch! I was so confused, because I have a book and it gives examples for nested transactions, explains the @@TRANCOUNT and stuff like that. But it doesn't say what are they good for(btw they weren't using any external transactional code). – Petar Minchev Jun 9 '12 at 12:01
  • 2
    Also see rusanu.com/2009/06/11/… – Aaron Bertrand Jun 9 '12 at 12:04
0

IF you are having scenario in which you call one SP which contains an other SP call in it. and that inner SP is also could be called independently from your application. In that case its necessary to place inner transaction(on Inner SP) as well as on parent SP.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.