7

Hello how can i remove item from generic list here is my code im trying to do it right but i dont know where i make mistake;/

Users us_end = new Users();
foreach (var VARIABLE in ((List<Users>)Application["Users_On"]))
{
    if(VARIABLE.Id == (int)Session["Current_Id"])
    {
        us_end.Name = VARIABLE.Name;
        us_end.Id = VARIABLE.Id;
        us_end.Data = VARIABLE.Data;
    }
}
List<Users> us = ((List<Users>)Application["Users_On"]);
us.Remove(us_end);
Application["Users_On"] = us;
  • 1
    Well, what doesn't behave as expected? (For Remove to work the item needs to correctly implement Equals). – user166390 Jun 10 '12 at 18:22
  • this doesnt really make alot of sense: you are overwriting every Users object you make inside that foreach.. – Thousand Jun 10 '12 at 18:23
  • Also, you cast Application["Users_On"] to a List<Users, yet later set it to a User. That is obviously wrong, it can't be both if you want that code to continue "working" – Ed S. Jun 10 '12 at 18:24
14

You have to get the same object to remove, not a copy.

Users us_end;

foreach (var VARIABLE in ((List<Users>)Application["Users_On"]))
{
    if(VARIABLE.Id == (int)Session["Current_Id"])
    {
       us_end = (Users)VARIABLE;
       break;
    }
}

if (us_end != null)
{
    List<Users> us = ((List<Users>)Application["Users_On"]);
    us.Remove(us_end);
    Application["Users_On"] = us;
}

Edit:

Just to clarify an address here, as pst pointed, you could also implement the IEquatable interface and some overridings like on the Groo's answer to make it work, but i think it's overkill on this specific subject. Giving this as the most common practice, but making clear that it's also possible to remove items from a list, even if they are diferent instances or even diferent objects with a technique like that.

Ref.: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms131187.aspx

  • So why haven't you posted the correct answer? if you think you are on a mood for explaining the overriding of a comparison just to remove an object from a list, do it so. I understand your pont of view, but please, make your own answer and explain it so he can mark it as the correct one instead of falling on me. – Ricardo Souza Jun 10 '12 at 19:09
  • Because the answers are "correct", including this one, just [initially] misleading :) Nit: It doesn't need to implement IEquatable as object.Equals(object) -- remember this is polymorphic! -- can still be used. I use Remove and other Equals-requiring methods and just "expect it to work" under the equality I have defined for my types. That is, I would expect a.Equals(b) to work in in the same manner as l.Add(a); l.Remove(b) works, and vice-versa. – user166390 Jun 10 '12 at 21:53
9

By default, object equality is compared by reference in .NET (unless Equals is overriden, every object inherits from object.Equals). If you want the Remove method to find your object, you cannot pass a new object.

The simplest way would be to find the actual object which has desired properties, and then remove it:

var id = (int)Session["Current_Id"];
var list = (List<Users>)Application["Users_On"];  

// find the exact item to remove.
var itemToRemove = list.FirstOrDefault(u => u.Id = id);

// if found, remove it
if (itemToRemove != null)
{
    list.Remove(itemToRemove);
}
  • But Equals is virtual. This does not make sense to me. – user166390 Jun 10 '12 at 18:24
  • @pst: a virtual method, unless explicity overriden, behaves like defined in the base class. Object.Equals compares by reference. – Groo Jun 10 '12 at 18:33
  • I can accept this after the update (it was wrong before, as the definition of Users is not known). – user166390 Jun 10 '12 at 18:33
6

You are creating a new Users object - this is not the same as any object already in Application["Users_On"] (it will have a different reference), so it will not be removed.

This assumes that Equals and/or IEquatable<T> were not overridden/implemented in Users.

List<Users> us = ((List<Users>)Application["Users_On"]);
Users us_end = us.Where(u => u.Id == (int)Session["Current_Id"]).FirstOrDefault();
us.Remove(us_end);
Application["Users_On"] = us;

By the way - your variable naming is not very good - go for more descriptive names.

  • 1
    Yes, it works on equality and by default for Objects, equality is implemented by checking reference ... – Nitin Midha Jun 10 '12 at 18:24
  • @pst - Which for reference type will be reference equality. – Oded Jun 10 '12 at 18:24
  • @Oded class Users { override Equals } ?? – user166390 Jun 10 '12 at 18:25
  • -1 Because this fails to address "This method determines equality using the default equality comparer EqualityComparer<T>.Default for T, the type of values in the list." msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cd666k3e.aspx and "The Default property checks whether type T implements the System.IEquatable<T> interface and, if so, returns an EqualityComparer<T> that uses that implementation. Otherwise, it returns an EqualityComparer<T> that uses the overrides of Object.Equals and Object.GetHashCode provided by T." msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms224763.aspx – user166390 Jun 10 '12 at 18:32
  • That is, "it will have a different reference" does not imply Remove will not work. – user166390 Jun 10 '12 at 18:35
0

What's about:

List<Users> us = ((List<Users>)Application["Users_On"]);
Users us_end = us.First(x => x.ID == (int)Session["Current_Id"]);
us.Remove(us_end);
Application["Users_On"] = us;
0

Remove it in place by finding the item inside the remove statement, not via an additional copy:

List<Users> us = ((List<Users>)Application["Users_On"]);
us.Remove(us.FirstOrDefault(u => u.ID == (int)Session["Current_Id"]));
Application["Users_On"] = us;
0

As someone said in the previous answers: object equality is compared by reference in .NET. But you can benefit from the difference between classes and structs by simply turning your element T inside List from class to struct.

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